coercive

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co·er·cive

 (kō-ûr′sĭv)
adj.
Characterized by or inclined to coercion.

co·er′cive·ly adv.
co·er′cive·ness n.

co•er•cive

(koʊˈɜr sɪv)

adj.
serving or tending to coerce.
[1590–1600]
co•er′cive•ly, adv.
co•er′cive•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.coercive - serving or intended to coerce; "authority is directional instead of coercive"
powerful - having great power or force or potency or effect; "the most powerful government in western Europe"; "his powerful arms"; "a powerful bomb"; "the horse's powerful kick"; "powerful drugs"; "a powerful argument"

coercive

adjective
Accomplished by force:
Informal: strong-arm.
Translations

coercive

[kəʊˈɜːsɪv] ADJcoactivo, coercitivo

coercive

[kəʊˈɜːrsɪv] adj [power, measure] → coercitif/ive

coercive

adjZwangs-

coercive

[kəʊˈɜːsɪv] adjcoercitivo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Aadhaar was supposed to showcase the government's forward thinking about efficient administration; it has only exposed the state's coerciveness.
And religion is a prime example of innate tribalism, passive by nature but when taken to an extreme can become the foundation stone of intimidation, coerciveness, and as we all know, much worse.
A one standard deviation increase in the perceived coerciveness of the Guidelines multiplies the odds of departure by a factor of .
Policy analysts the world over were influenced by Lowi's mid-1960s endeavour to classify the policies that US governments have at their disposal and differentiate them based on the degree of coerciveness that governments exercise in their implementation at different periods in American history (Lowi 1966).
Their coerciveness was such that if we did not eat Weetbix for breakfast and lamb chops for "tea," if we did not call our grandmothers "Nana," or follow the rugby or eat at barbeques at the weekend, we did not dare let on.
These congruities of blood, speech, custom and so on, are seen to have an ineffable, and at times overpowering coerciveness in and of themselves" (Geertz, 1963: 109).
It is a device which is designed to make takeovers prohibitively expensive: or PPs are designed to give management unlimited authority to prevent takeovers from happening, and thus are a management entrenchment device: or PPs are a device that takes away the shareholders right to sell their stock at a premium, or PP's are designed to prevent shareholders from takeover-abuses such as front-end-loaded, two-tier offers; or that they are intended to take the coerciveness out of cash tender offers: or that they provide a means of giving the board of directors the time and leverage necessary to seek higher premiums for shareholders after a take-over bid : or that they are designed to provide a more level playing field in a situation that is already badly tilted in favor of offererors.
Achieving this goal does not require the unacceptable coerciveness of China's one-child policy.
obscuring law's coerciveness particularly troubling.
Accordingly, the incidence of non-state conflict has no correlation with the coercive capacity of the state, coerciveness measured in terms of military spending/GDP ratio (rs=0.