coeval


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Related to coeval: coetaneous

co·e·val

 (kō-ē′vəl)
adj.
Originating or existing during the same period; lasting through the same era.
n.
One of the same era or period; a contemporary.

[From Late Latin coaevus : co-, co- + aevum, age; see aiw- in Indo-European roots.]

co·e′val·ly adv.

coeval

(kəʊˈiːvəl)
adj
of or belonging to the same age or generation
n
a contemporary
[C17: from Late Latin coaevus from Latin co- + aevum age]
coevality n
coˈevally adv

co•e•val

(koʊˈi vəl)

adj.
1. of the same age or duration; equally old: This manuscript is coeval with that one.
2. coincident or contemporaneous.
n.
3. a contemporary.
[1595–1605; < Late Latin coaev(us) (Latin co- co- + -aevus, adj. derivative of aevum age) + -al1]
co•e′val•ly, adv.
syn: See contemporary.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coeval - a person of nearly the same age as another
compeer, equal, peer, match - a person who is of equal standing with another in a group
Adj.1.coeval - of the same period
synchronal, synchronic, synchronous - occurring or existing at the same time or having the same period or phase; "recovery was synchronous with therapy"- Jour.A.M.A.; "a synchronous set of clocks"; "the synchronous action of a bird's wings in flight"; "synchronous oscillations"

coeval

adjective
Belonging to the same period of time as another:
noun
One of the same time or age as another:
Translations

coeval

[kəʊˈiːvəl]
A. ADJcoetáneo (with de) → contemporáneo (with de)
B. Ncoetáneo/a m/f, contemporáneo/a m/f

coeval

(form)
adjder gleichen Periode or Zeit (with wie); manuscripts, authors etc alsozeitgenössisch attr
nZeitgenosse m
References in classic literature ?
It was now that Julia, in some measure accustomed to her proximity to her hero, began to enjoy the beauties of the scenery; her eye dwelt with rapture on each opening glimpse that they caught of the river, and took in its gaze meadows of never-failing verdure, which were beautifully interspersed with elms that seemed coeval with the country itself.
These structures bear every indication of a very high antiquity and Kory-Kory, who was my authority in all matters of scientific research, gave me to understand that they were coeval with the creation of the world; that the great gods themselves were the builders; and that they would endure until time shall be no more.
They were coeval with the coureurs des bois, or rangers of the woods, already noticed, and, like them, in the intervals of their long, arduous, and laborious expeditions, were prone to pass their time in idleness and revelry about the trading posts or settlements; squandering their hard earnings in heedless conviviality, and rivaling their neighbors, the Indians, in indolent indulgence and an imprudent disregard of the morrow.
born at every moment, yet of an age coeval with the rocks, and far surpassing the venerable antiquity of a forest.
The scenery was remarkable The chief part of the range was composed of grand, solid, abrupt masses of granite, which appeared as if they had been coeval with the beginning of the world.
Such an eye was not born when the bird was, but is coeval with the sky it reflects.
An old woman, who seemed coeval with the building, and greatly resembled her whom Chamont mentions in the Orphan, received us at the gate, and in a howl scarce human, and to me unintelligible, welcomed her master home.
A corpulent man, with a fortnight's napkin under his arm, and coeval stockings on his legs, slowly desisted from his occupation of staring down the street, on this question being put to him by Mr.
The Draculas were, says Arminius, a great and noble race, though now and again were scions who were held by their coevals to have had dealings with the Evil One.
One obvious example is his understanding of the terms tashbih and tanzih, which is by no means coeval with the familiar use of these terms.
It was perhaps only a desire to keep these coeval works distinct that restricted Beckett's presence in Modernism and Music to cameo appearances: his translation of some lines from Ernst Moerman's poem 'Louis Armstrong' (which featured in Nancy Cunard's anthology Negro) (M&M, p.
Coeval developments in the sciences and professions, however, made such views increasingly untenable.