cog


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cog 1

 (kŏg, kôg)
n.
1. One of a series of teeth, as on the rim of a wheel or gear, whose engagement transmits successive motive force to a corresponding wheel or gear.
2. A cogwheel.
3. A subordinate member of an organization who performs necessary but usually minor or routine functions.

[Middle English cogge, probably of Scandinavian origin; akin to Swedish kugg, kugge.]

cogged adj.

cog 2

 (kŏg, kôg)
v. cogged, cog·ging, cogs
v.tr.
To load or manipulate (dice) fraudulently.
v.intr.
To cheat, especially at dice.
n.
An instance of cheating; a swindle.

[Origin unknown.]

cog 3

 (kŏg, kôg)
n.
A tenon projecting from a wooden beam designed to fit into an opening in another beam to form a joint.
tr.v. cogged, cog·ging, cogs
To join with tenons.

[Alteration (influenced by cog) of cock, to join with tenons.]

cog

(kɒɡ)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) any of the teeth or projections on the rim of a gearwheel or sprocket
2. (Mechanical Engineering) a gearwheel, esp a small one
3. a person or thing playing a small part in a large organization or process
vb, cogs, cogging or cogged
(Metallurgy) (tr) metallurgy to roll (cast-steel ingots) to convert them into blooms
[C13: of Scandinavian origin; compare Danish kogge, Swedish kugge, Norwegian kug]

cog

(kɒɡ)
vb, cogs, cogging or cogged
slang to cheat (in a game, esp dice), as by loading a dice
[C16: originally a dice-playing term, of unknown origin]

cog

(kɒɡ)
n
(Building) a tenon that projects from the end of a timber beam for fitting into a mortise
vb, cogs, cogging or cogged
(Building) (tr) to join (pieces of wood) with cogs
[C19: of uncertain origin]

cog1

(kɒg, kɔg)

n.
1. a gear tooth, esp. one of hardwood or metal, fitted into a slot in a gearwheel of less durable material.
2. a cogwheel.
3. a person who plays a minor part in an organization, activity, etc.
[1200–50; Middle English cogge, probably < Scandinavian; compare Swedish, Norwegian kugg cog]

cog2

(kɒg, kɔg)

v. cogged, cog•ging. v.t.
1. to manipulate or load (dice) unfairly.
v.i.
2. to cheat, esp. at dice.
[1525–35; orig. uncertain]

cog3

(kɒg, kɔg)

n., v. cogged, cog•ging. n.
1. the tongue in one timber, fitting into a corresponding slot in another to form a joint.
v.t., v.i.
2. to join with a cog.
[1855–60; probably cog1]

cog.

cognate.

cog


Past participle: cogged
Gerund: cogging

Imperative
cog
cog
Present
I cog
you cog
he/she/it cogs
we cog
you cog
they cog
Preterite
I cogged
you cogged
he/she/it cogged
we cogged
you cogged
they cogged
Present Continuous
I am cogging
you are cogging
he/she/it is cogging
we are cogging
you are cogging
they are cogging
Present Perfect
I have cogged
you have cogged
he/she/it has cogged
we have cogged
you have cogged
they have cogged
Past Continuous
I was cogging
you were cogging
he/she/it was cogging
we were cogging
you were cogging
they were cogging
Past Perfect
I had cogged
you had cogged
he/she/it had cogged
we had cogged
you had cogged
they had cogged
Future
I will cog
you will cog
he/she/it will cog
we will cog
you will cog
they will cog
Future Perfect
I will have cogged
you will have cogged
he/she/it will have cogged
we will have cogged
you will have cogged
they will have cogged
Future Continuous
I will be cogging
you will be cogging
he/she/it will be cogging
we will be cogging
you will be cogging
they will be cogging
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cogging
you have been cogging
he/she/it has been cogging
we have been cogging
you have been cogging
they have been cogging
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cogging
you will have been cogging
he/she/it will have been cogging
we will have been cogging
you will have been cogging
they will have been cogging
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cogging
you had been cogging
he/she/it had been cogging
we had been cogging
you had been cogging
they had been cogging
Conditional
I would cog
you would cog
he/she/it would cog
we would cog
you would cog
they would cog
Past Conditional
I would have cogged
you would have cogged
he/she/it would have cogged
we would have cogged
you would have cogged
they would have cogged
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cog - a subordinate who performs an important but routine function; "he was a small cog in a large machine"
subordinate, subsidiary, underling, foot soldier - an assistant subject to the authority or control of another
2.cog - tooth on the rim of gear wheelcog - tooth on the rim of gear wheel  
cogwheel, gear, gear wheel, geared wheel - a toothed wheel that engages another toothed mechanism in order to change the speed or direction of transmitted motion
tooth - something resembling the tooth of an animal
Verb1.cog - roll steel ingots
roll out, roll - flatten or spread with a roller; "roll out the paper"
2.cog - join pieces of wood with cogs
bring together, join - cause to become joined or linked; "join these two parts so that they fit together"
Translations
أسْنان
zub
tand
tönn, kíll
krumplys
zobs
çark dişidiş

cog

[kɒg] Ndiente m (de rueda dentada)
just a cog in the wheeluna pieza del mecanismo, nada más

cog

[ˈkɒg] ndent f (d'engrenage)
to be a cog in a machine, to be a cog in a wheel [person] → être un rouage de la machine

cog

n (Tech) → Zahn m; (= cogwheel)Zahnrad nt; he’s only a cog in the machine (fig)er ist nur ein Rädchen im Getriebe; each employee is a vital cog in the companyjeder einzelne Angestellte ist ein wichtiger Teil in der Firma

cog

:
cog railway
n (US) → Zahnradbahn f
cogwheel
nZahnrad nt

cog

[kɒg] ndente m
a cog in the wheel (fig) → una rotella in un grande ingranaggio

cog

(kog) noun
one of a series of teeth around the edge of a wheel which fits into one of a similar series in a similar wheel (or into a chain as in a bicycle) causing motion. The cogs in the gear-wheels of a car get worn down.
References in classic literature ?
Had he not just gotten a job, and become a sharer in all this activity, a cog in this marvelous machine?
I must put a cog in his wheel, and do it right away, too.
Perhaps he's one of those creatures who've slipped the ratchet off the motion cog.
There is a very proper cog out yonder," said Sir Nigel, "it would be a very strange thing if any ship were not a war-ship when it had such men as these upon her decks.
The failure of the wireless did not appear as momentous to me as to him, which is not unnatural, since it is but human to feel that when our own little cog slips, the entire universe must necessarily be put out of gear.
There are three railway-tracks; the central one is cogged; the "lantern wheel" of the engine grips its way along these cogs, and pulls the train up the hill or retards its motion on the down trip.
He comes to a gateway in the brick wall, looks in, and sees a great perplexity of iron lying about in every stage and in a vast variety of shapes--in bars, in wedges, in sheets; in tanks, in boilers, in axles, in wheels, in cogs, in cranks, in rails; twisted and wrenched into eccentric and perverse forms as separate parts of machinery; mountains of it broken up, and rusty in its age; distant furnaces of it glowing and bubbling in its youth; bright fireworks of it showering about under the blows of the steam-hammer; red-hot iron, white-hot iron, cold-black iron; an iron taste, an iron smell, and a Babel of iron sounds.
Then perhaps the bell would jam or a brake fail to act on a hill; or the seat-pillar would get loose, and the saddle drop three or four inches with a disconcerting bump; or the loose and rattling chain would jump the cogs of the chain-wheel as the machine ran downhill, and so bring the mechanism to an abrupt and disastrous stop without at the same time arresting the forward momentum of the rider; or a tyre would bang, or sigh quietly, and give up the struggle for efficiency.
Wheels creak on their axles as the cogs engage one another and the revolving pulleys whirr with the rapidity of their movement, but a neighboring wheel is as quiet and motionless as though it were prepared to remain so for a hundred years; but the moment comes when the lever catches it and obeying the impulse that wheel begins to creak and joins in the common motion the result and aim of which are beyond its ken.
He tested the steering device, and overlooked the mighty cogs which transmitted its marvelous velocity to the giant drill at the nose of his strange craft.
It seemed to him more like cogs slipping in his brain.
And he could conclude only that there were no warm human men at the other end, only mere cogs, well oiled and running beautifully in the machine.