cogito, ergo sum

cogito, ergo sum

(ˈkɒɡɪˌtəʊ ˈɜːɡəʊ ˈsʊm)
(Philosophy) I think, therefore I am; the basis of Descartes' philosophy

co•gi•to, er•go sum

(ˈkoʊ gɪˌtoʊ ˈɛr goʊ ˈsʊm; Eng. ˈkɒdʒ ɪˌtoʊ ˈɜr goʊ ˈsʌm, ˈɛr goʊ)
Latin.
I think, therefore I am (stated by Descartes as the first principle in resolving universal doubt).
References in periodicals archive ?
From his childhood and schooling, to his contributions to science such as the invention of analytic geometry and his methods for testing hypotheses that formed the foundation of experimental science, to his piety as a Christian and much more, Cogito, Ergo Sum closely follows Descartes' life.
Cogito, ergo sum (I think, therefore I am) has never quite cut it with me.
Since the entire series of two-page chapters revolves around the Cartesian idea of Cogito, ergo sum, one is led to believe that Wanda's "eternity" could be imaginary.
In our collective history, this moment marks a landmark alliance of science and philosophy -- cogito, ergo sum (I think, therefore I am).
Cogito, ergo sum suggests the importance of the first-personal point of view, where thinking is the ultimate warrant of being.
Cogito, ergo sum (I think, therefore I am), said Descartes (1596-1650), and this Latin aphorism became his first principle in philosophy.