cognate


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cog·nate

 (kŏg′nāt′)
adj.
1. Related by blood; having a common ancestor.
2. Related in origin, as certain words in genetically related languages descended from the same ancestral root; for example, English name and Latin nōmen from Indo-European *nō̆-men-.
3. Related or analogous in nature, character, or function.
n.
1. One related by blood or origin with another, especially a person sharing an ancestor with another.
2. A word related to one in another language.
3. A sequence of university courses taken as an adjunct to a graduate degree program: earned an MA in linguistics with a cognate in computer science.

[Latin cognātus : co-, co- + gnātus, born, past participle of nāscī, to be born; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·na′tion n.

cognate

(ˈkɒɡneɪt)
adj
1. akin; related: cognate languages.
2. (Law) related by blood or descended from a common maternal ancestor. Compare agnate
3. (Grammar) cognate object grammar a noun functioning as the object of a verb to which it is etymologically related, as in think a thought or sing a song
n
something that is cognate with something else
[C17: from Latin cognātus, from co- same + gnātus born, variant of nātus, past participle of nāscī to be born]
ˈcognately adv
ˈcognateness n
cogˈnation n

cog•nate

(ˈkɒg neɪt)

adj.
1. related by birth; of the same parentage or descent.
2. descended from the same language or form: such cognate languages as French and Spanish.
3. allied or similar in nature or quality.
n.
4. a person or thing cognate with another.
5. a cognate word: The English word cold is a cognate of German kalt.
[1635–45; < Latin cognātus=co- co- + -gnātus, past participle of (g)nāscī to be born]
cog′nate•ly, adv.
cog′nate•ness, n.

cognate

a relation through descent on the female side. Cf. agnate. — cognate, — cognatic, adj.
See also: Relationship
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognate - one related by blood or origin; especially on sharing an ancestor with another
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
2.cognate - a word is cognate with another if both derive from the same word in an ancestral language
word - a unit of language that native speakers can identify; "words are the blocks from which sentences are made"; "he hardly said ten words all morning"
Adj.1.cognate - related in nature; "connate qualities"
related, related to - being connected either logically or causally or by shared characteristics ; "painting and the related arts"; "school-related activities"; "related to micelle formation is the...ability of detergent actives to congregate at oil-water interfaces"
2.cognate - having the same ancestral language; "cognate languages"
linguistics - the scientific study of language
related, related to - being connected either logically or causally or by shared characteristics ; "painting and the related arts"; "school-related activities"; "related to micelle formation is the...ability of detergent actives to congregate at oil-water interfaces"
3.cognate - related by bloodcognate - related by blood      
related - connected by kinship, common origin, or marriage

cognate

adjective related, similar, allied, associated, connected, alike, affiliated, akin, analogous, kindred Apocalypticism and millennialism are cognate theological terms.

cognate

adjective
Connected by or as if by kinship or common origin:
Translations

cognate

[ˈkɒgneɪt]
A. ADJcognado (with con) → afín
B. Ncognado m

cognate

adjverwandt; (Ling) → urverwandt
n (Ling) → urverwandtes Wort, urverwandte Sprache; “night” is a cognate of “Nacht”night“ ist mit „Nachtverwandt

cognate

n. cognado, palabra que proviene del mismo tronco o raíz;
a. cognado-a, de la misma naturaleza o calidad.
References in classic literature ?
Whether that Artificer of things, The origin of a better world, made him from the divine seed; Or the earth, being recent and lately sundered from the high Ether, retained some seeds of cognate heaven.
And the habit which is concerned with geometry and the cognate sciences I suppose that you would term understanding and not reason, as being intermediate between opinion and reason.
Since this change reduces the cognate portion for word stems to a single consonant, the result does not provide very good evidence for that cognation.
But technology now allows a better way for rights to get noticed, and Cognate is the first place to make this available to everyone who creates a new name for a product or business.
The first 15 pages yielded many cognates, strong to weak, but most share a common prefix, either ab- (from) or ad- (to).
Several researchers have commented on the effective use of cognates (Garcia & Nagy, 1993; Nagy, Garcia, Durgunolgu, & Hancin-Bhatt, 1993).
UEW (314) does not mention the Saami word and considers Hung nyes an uncertain cognate, but includes KhE net-, nat- 'pluck, pick, tear in the cognate set.
Chronologically next are stems belonging to the Finno-Ugric layer, and have a cognate at least in one Ugric language: Khanty, Mansi or Hungarian and which are not loans from Proto-Indo-European, Proto-Indo-Iranian or Proto-Iranian.
In other words, they have a variety of cross-linguistic transfer strategies such as code-switching or focusing on cognates that they can use to improve their reading comprehension.
Using an algorithm known as the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampler, the program sorted through sets of cognates - words in different languages that share a common sound, history and origin - to calculate the odds of which set is derived from which proto-language.
Cognate swapping across languages could have occurred more often than assumed by Atkinson, undermining his conclusions, Eska says.
Considering the large number of cognate pairs between Spanish and English, there is a high possibility for transfer to occur for a large number of words.