cognition


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cog·ni·tion

 (kŏg-nĭsh′ən)
n.
1. The mental process of knowing, including aspects such as awareness, perception, reasoning, and judgment.
2. That which comes to be known, as through perception, reasoning, or intuition; knowledge.

[Middle English cognicioun, from Latin cognitiō, cognitiōn-, from cognitus, past participle of cognōscere, to learn : co-, intensive pref.; see co- + gnōscere, to know; see gnō- in Indo-European roots.]

cog·ni′tion·al adj.

cognition

(kɒɡˈnɪʃən)
n
1. (Psychology) the mental act or process by which knowledge is acquired, including perception, intuition, and reasoning
2. the knowledge that results from such an act or process
[C15: from Latin cognitiō, from cognōscere from co- (intensive) + nōscere to learn; see know]
cogˈnitional adj

cog•ni•tion

(kɒgˈnɪʃ ən)

n.
1. the act or process of knowing; perception.
2. something known or perceived.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin cognitiō <cogni-, variant s. of cognōscere to get to know (co- co- + (g)nōscere to get to know) + -tiō -tion]
cog•ni′tion•al, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoningcognition - the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning
psychological feature - a feature of the mental life of a living organism
mind, psyche, nous, brain, head - that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason; "his mind wandered"; "I couldn't get his words out of my head"
place - an abstract mental location; "he has a special place in my thoughts"; "a place in my heart"; "a political system with no place for the less prominent groups"
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
episteme - the body of ideas that determine the knowledge that is intellectually certain at any particular time
ability, power - possession of the qualities (especially mental qualities) required to do something or get something done; "danger heightened his powers of discrimination"
inability - lack of ability (especially mental ability) to do something
lexis - all of the words in a language; all word forms having meaning or grammatical function
lexicon, mental lexicon, vocabulary - a language user's knowledge of words
practice - knowledge of how something is usually done; "it is not the local practice to wear shorts to dinner"
cognitive factor - something immaterial (as a circumstance or influence) that contributes to producing a result
equivalent - a person or thing equal to another in value or measure or force or effect or significance etc; "send two dollars or the equivalent in stamps"
cognitive operation, cognitive process, mental process, process, operation - (psychology) the performance of some composite cognitive activity; an operation that affects mental contents; "the process of thinking"; "the cognitive operation of remembering"
unconscious process, process - a mental process that you are not directly aware of; "the process of denial"
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"
structure - the complex composition of knowledge as elements and their combinations; "his lectures have no structure"
cognitive content, mental object, content - the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned
information - knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction
history - all that is remembered of the past as preserved in writing; a body of knowledge; "the dawn of recorded history"; "from the beginning of history"
attitude, mental attitude - a complex mental state involving beliefs and feelings and values and dispositions to act in certain ways; "he had the attitude that work was fun"

cognition

noun (Formal) perception, reasoning, understanding, intelligence, awareness, insight, comprehension, apprehension, discernment processes of perception and cognition
Translations

cognition

[kɒgˈnɪʃən] Ncognición f

cognition

nErkenntnis f; (visual) → Wahrnehmung f

cognition

[ˌkɒgˈnɪʃn] n (frm) → apprendimento

cog·ni·tion

n. cognición, conocimiento, acción y efecto de conocer.
References in classic literature ?
This direction towards an object is commonly regarded as typical of every form of cognition, and sometimes of mental life altogether.
It is unclear what role a1A-adrenergic receptors (ARs) have on neurogenesis, cognition and mood.
The cross-sectional associations between the vitamin D intakes--whether from diet, sun exposure or drug supplements--and cognition strengthened this hypothesis, but prevented the finding of a cause and effect link.
Generally, meta-cognition comprises two main components: regulation of cognition and knowledge of cognition.
Cognition, based in Leamington Spa and London, has been appointed to provide marketing communications support for The Lightbulb Company, Redwood Telecommunication, Prolegal, Phoenix, IP Solutions and TCC Global.
Specifically, the book focuses on the biology of music cognition and brain function to answer the questions of how and why music is part of our emotional life.
The effects of "early diet on cognition and the brain 2.
of North Carolina at Chapel Hill) bring together psychologists from North America, Europe, and Australia who present, in 29 chapters, the key findings, theories, and practical applications of implicit social cognition research.
abilities, means cognition, intelligence, autonomy, learning and knowledge management capabilities of the system.
Cognition process is hence indispensable in developing trust relationships between Chinese and foreign firms.
The book's thesis at large is that Descartes develops a new account of the human mind when compared to his scholastic predecessors and, in particular, to Aquinas' theory of cognition (3).