cognitive neuroscience


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

cognitive neuroscience

n.
The branch of neuroscience that deals with the way neurological mechanisms are involved in thinking and behavior.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognitive neuroscience - the branch of neuroscience that studies the biological foundations of mental phenomena
neuroscience - the scientific study of the nervous system
cognitive science - the field of science concerned with cognition; includes parts of cognitive psychology and linguistics and computer science and cognitive neuroscience and philosophy of mind
References in periodicals archive ?
Tsipursky describes in his work, have become answerable due to a recent wave of research in psychology, cognitive neuroscience, and medicine.
Cameron Carter, Editor of Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.
We also lay out a multilevel framework for integrating cognitive neuroscience approaches with more traditional methods for examining AUD treatment mechanisms.
Cognitive neuroscience aims to understand the neural bases of cognition.
eds) (2000)The Cognitive Neuroscience of Face Perception.
the University College London Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, said: "Dyscalculia is at least as much of a handicap for individuals as dyslexia and a very heavy burden on the state, with the estimated cost to the UK of low numeracy standing at pounds 2.
The authors spent years exploring magic around the world: their explanations use the latest cognitive neuroscience findings to reveal the secrets behind magic tricks and brain perception.
Mishkin is chief of the National Institute of Mental Health's (NIMH) Section on Cognitive Neuroscience, and acting chief of its Laboratory of Neuropsychology.
Her new play, Patient HM, seems poised to do for cognitive neuroscience what Proof did for higher mathematics.
In the study, led by Angela Sirigu of the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of Lyon, both patients had been right-handed before losing their hands, and both followed a pattern of reconnection with their brain that was quicker for the left hand.
Professor Brian Butterworth, a dyscalculia expert, from the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, at University College London, undertook the study in Cuba with the Cuban Centre for Neuroscience.
This meant that neuroscience could extend itself into the area known as cognitive neuroscience.

Full browser ?