cognizance


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Related to cognizance: take cognizance

cog·ni·zance

 (kŏg′nĭ-zəns)
n.
1. Conscious knowledge or recognition; awareness.
2. The range of what one can know or understand.
3. Observance; notice: We will take cognizance of your objections at the proper time.
4. Law Acknowledgment, recognition, or jurisdiction; the assumption of jurisdiction in a case.
5. Heraldry A crest or badge worn to distinguish the bearer.

[Middle English conissaunce, from Old French conoissance, from connoistre, to know, from Latin cognōscere, to learn; see cognition.]

cognizance

(ˈkɒɡnɪzəns; ˈkɒnɪ-) or

cognisance

n
1. knowledge; acknowledgment
2. take cognizance of to take notice of; acknowledge, esp officially
3. the range or scope of knowledge or perception
4. (Law) law
a. the right of a court to hear and determine a cause or matter
b. knowledge of certain facts upon which the court must act without requiring proof
c. chiefly US confession
5. (Heraldry) heraldry a distinguishing badge or bearing
[C14: from Old French conoissance, from conoistre to know, from Latin cognōscere to learn; see cognition]

cog•ni•zance

(ˈkɒg nə zəns, ˈkɒn ə-)

n.
1. awareness or realization; notice: to take cognizance of a slighting remark.
2.
a. judicial notice as taken by a court in dealing with a cause.
b. the right of taking jurisdiction, as possessed by a court.
3. the range or scope of a person's knowledge, observation, etc.: Such perceptions are beyond my cognizance.
4. a heraldic emblem serving as an identifying mark.
[1250–1300; Middle English conisa(u)nce < Middle French con(o)is(s)ance <conois(tre) to know < Latin cognōscere cognition]

cognizance

- Latin gnoscene, "know," begat cognoscere, "get to know; recognize," and it moved through French connoissance to English to become cognizance.
See also related terms for recognize.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cognizance - having knowledge of; "he had no awareness of his mistakes"; "his sudden consciousness of the problem he faced"; "their intelligence and general knowingness was impressive"
self-awareness - awareness of your own individuality
feel - an intuitive awareness; "he has a feel for animals" or "it's easy when you get the feel of it";
sense - a general conscious awareness; "a sense of security"; "a sense of happiness"; "a sense of danger"; "a sense of self"
knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension
incognizance - a lack of knowledge or recognition
2.cognizance - range of what one can know or understand; "beyond my ken"
knowing - a clear and certain mental apprehension
3.cognizance - range or scope of what is perceived
perception - knowledge gained by perceiving; "a man admired for the depth of his perception"

cognizance

noun
1. The condition of being aware:
2. The act of noting, observing, or taking into account:
Translations

cognizance

[ˈkɒgnɪzəns] Nconocimiento m
to be within one's cognizanceser de la competencia de uno
to take cognizance oftener en cuenta

cognizance

[ˈkɒgnɪzəns] cognisance (British) n (formal)
to take cognizance of sth (= acknowledge) → prendre connaissance de qch
(= knowledge) → connaissance f

cognizance

n (form)
(= conscious knowledge, awareness)Kenntnis f; (= range of perception)Erkenntnisbereich m; to take cognizance of somethingetw zur Kenntnis nehmen
(= jurisdiction)Zuständigkeit f, → Befugnis f; (Jur) → Gerichtsbarkeit f

cognizance

cognisance [ˈkɒgnɪzəns] n (frm) → conoscenza
to take cognisance of sth → tener conto di qc
References in classic literature ?
And thus at every course that he rode to and fro he changed his color, so that there might neither king nor knight have ready cognizance of him.
Bean, one of the Americans, was found a note-book in which had been penciled some sentences which admit us, in flesh and spirit, as it were, to the presence of these men during their last hours of life, and to the grisly horrors which their fading vision looked upon and their failing consciousness took cognizance of:
On his right arm was a silver plate, which, instead of bearing, as usual, the cognizance or badge of the baron to whose family he belonged, had barely the word =Sherwood= engraved upon it.
Did it merely take cognizance of what passed within the soul?
If my offence is unintentional, the law has no cognizance of unintentional offences: you ought to have taken me privately, and warned and admonished me; for if I had been better advised, I should have left off doing what I only did unintentionally--no doubt I should; but you would have nothing to say to me and refused to teach me.
These must possess all the authorities which are connected with this object, and with every other that may be allotted to their particular cognizance and direction.
The salaries of the judges, which the constitution expressly requires to be fixed, had been occasionally varied; and cases belonging to the judiciary department frequently drawn within legislative cognizance and determination.
But we can no more take cognizance of our 'height' than you can of your 'extra-height'.
Or, if there were, the boy's troubled mind took no cognizance of them.
But are there not a thousand tortures by which a man may be made to suffer without society taking the least cognizance of them, or offering him even the insufficient means of vengeance, of which we have just spoken?
She said that I must spend that time amongst her pupils to learn their characters, to be AU COURANT with everything that was passing in the house, to become interested in what interested her, to be able to give her my opinion on knotty points when she required it, and this she did constantly, never allowing my interest in the pupils to fall asleep, and never making any change of importance without my cognizance and consent.
Such passages will be found, however, to be based upon facts admitting of no contradiction, and which have come immediately under the writer's cognizance.