cohesion


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Related to cohesion: group cohesion

co·he·sion

 (kō-hē′zhən)
n.
1. The act, process, or condition of cohering: exhibited strong cohesion in the family unit.
2. Physics The intermolecular attraction by which the elements of a body are held together.
3. Botany The congenital union of parts of the same kind, such as a calyx of five united sepals.

[From Latin cohaesus, past participle of cohaerēre, to cling together; see cohere.]

co·he′sive (-sĭv, -zĭv) adj.
co·he′sive·ly adv.
co·he′sive·ness n.

cohesion

(kəʊˈhiːʒən)
n
1. the act or state of cohering; tendency to unite
2. (General Physics) physics the force that holds together the atoms or molecules in a solid or liquid, as distinguished from adhesion
3. (Botany) botany the fusion in some plants of flower parts, such as petals, that are usually separate
[C17: from Latin cohaesus stuck together, past participle of cohaerēre to cohere]

co•he•sion

(koʊˈhi ʒən)

n.
1. the act or state of cohering, uniting, or sticking together.
2. the molecular force between particles within a body or substance that acts to unite them.
3. Bot. the congenital union of one part with another.
4. Ling. the property of unity in speech or writing that stems from links among surface elements, as in the reference of pronouns to elements in the surrounding discourse.
[1670–80; variant of cohaesion < Latin cohaes-,cohaerēre to cohere]

co·he·sion

(kō-hē′zhən)
The force of attraction that holds molecules of a given substance together. It is strongest in solids, less strong in liquids, and least strong in gases. Cohesion allows the formation of drops in liquids, and clouds in the atmosphere.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cohesion - the state of cohering or sticking together
connectedness, connection, link - the state of being connected; "the connection between church and state is inescapable"
consistency - logical coherence and accordance with the facts; "a rambling argument that lacked any consistency"
continuity - uninterrupted connection or union
2.cohesion - (botany) the process in some plants of parts growing together that are usually separate (such as petals)
phytology, botany - the branch of biology that studies plants
growing, growth, ontogenesis, ontogeny, maturation, development - (biology) the process of an individual organism growing organically; a purely biological unfolding of events involved in an organism changing gradually from a simple to a more complex level; "he proposed an indicator of osseous development in children"
3.cohesion - (physics) the intermolecular force that holds together the molecules in a solid or liquid
natural philosophy, physics - the science of matter and energy and their interactions; "his favorite subject was physics"
force - (physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity; "force equals mass times acceleration"

cohesion

noun
The close physical union of two objects:
Translations

cohesion

[kəʊˈhiːʒən] Ncohesión f

cohesion

[kəʊˈhiːʒən] ncohésion f

cohesion

n (Sci) → Kohäsion f; (fig also)Zusammenhang m; (of group)Zusammenhalt m, → Geschlossenheit f

cohesion

[kəʊˈhiːʒn] ncoesione f

co·he·sion

n. cohesión, unión, fuerza que une a las moléculas.
References in classic literature ?
Ay, ay," answered the doctor, "jellies are very good for wounds, for they promote cohesion.
There was no cohesion among the particles, and it could not be moulded into snow- balls.
Then upon my honour," says Sir Leicester after a terrific pause during which he has been heard to snort and felt to stare, "then upon my honour, upon my life, upon my reputation and principles, the floodgates of society are burst open, and the waters have--a-- obliterated the landmarks of the framework of the cohesion by which things are held together
Pent in their vast and festering charnel-house, all organization and cohesion lost, they could do naught but die.
The finance ministers of Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia signed a common position on the future of the Common Cohesion Policy from 2020.
The EU's cohesion policy should be less administratively demanding in the future, and it should be better targeted towards less-developed EU regions, stated vice prime minister for investments and informatisation, Peter Pellegrini (Smer) on January 18, after meeting the European Commissioner for Regional Policies, Corina Cretu in Bratislava.
During the EU's seven-year financial period after 2020, the Cohesion Policy will remain the major bond of the EU, despite Brexit and increased EU spending on security issues, while the multi-speed EU, due to further deep integration of the Eurozone countries is inevitable, and some EU sanctions against Poland and Hungary are possible --those were the main talking points at the 7th Cohesion Forum of the highest-level EU officials in Brussels on June 26-27.
Bulgaria is among the countries without any mistakes in the management of projects under the cohesion policy of the EU, showed the annual report of the European Court of Auditors on the implementation of the European budget for 2015, presented to the Council of Ministers by the Bulgarian representative in the institution Iliana Ivanova.
Cohesion, a nationally recognized brand and marketing consultancy, has launched Cohesion Digital, a new digital brand and marketing practice, according to Brian Creath, president of Cohesion.
Editors Salas, Vessey, and Estrada present readers with a collection of academic essays focused on the use of psychological methods to build team cohesion across a wide variety of organizational contexts.
El analisis de los elementos que posibilitan la existencia de desequilibrios territoriales es objeto del presente apartado, con la finalidad de explicar como la cohesion territorial en pro de la reduccion de dichos desequilibrios, se relaciona con las dimensiones territoriales y actuaciones en el sistema territorial.
I was disappointed in the recent article on readability and text cohesion.