cohort


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Related to cohort: Cohort study, Cohort Analysis

co·hort

 (kō′hôrt′)
n.
1.
a. A group or band of people.
b. A companion or associate.
c. A generational group as defined in demographics, statistics, or market research: "The cohort of people aged 30 to 39 ... were more conservative" (American Demographics).
2.
a. One of the 10 divisions of a Roman legion, consisting of 300 to 600 men.
b. A group of soldiers.

[Middle English, from Old French cohorte, from Latin cohors, cohort-; see gher- in Indo-European roots.]
Usage Note: The English word cohort comes from the Latin word cohors, which meant "an enclosed area" or "a pen or courtyard enclosing a group of cattle or poultry." By extension, the word could refer to any group in general and in particular to a company of soldiers or a troop of cavalry in the army of ancient Rome. The group of men forming the bodyguard of a Roman general or the retinue of a provincial governor was also called a cohors. Because of this history, some people insist that the English word cohort should be used to refer only to a group of people and never to an individual person. But the use of cohort in reference to individuals has become so common, especially in the plural, as to overshadow the use in the singular to refer to a group. Both in our 1988 and 1999 surveys, 71 percent of the Usage Panel accepted the sentence The cashiered dictator and his cohorts have all written their memoirs. These results stand in stark contrast to those of our 1965 survey, in which 69 percent rejected the usage. Moreover, the Panel is divided regarding the traditional usage referring to a group. In 1988, 43 percent accepted The gangster walked into the room surrounded by his cohort, and in 1999, 56 percent accepted Like many in her cohort, she was never interested in kids when she was young.

cohort

(ˈkəʊhɔːt)
n
1. (Military) one of the ten units of between 300 and 600 men in an ancient Roman Legion
2. any band of warriors or associates: the cohorts of Satan.
3. chiefly US an associate or follower
4. (Biology) biology a taxonomic group that is a subdivision of a subclass (usually of mammals) or subfamily (of plants)
5. (Statistics) statistics a group of people with a statistic in common, esp having been born in the same year
[C15: from Latin cohors yard, company of soldiers; related to hortus garden]

co•hort

(ˈkoʊ hɔrt)

n.
1. a companion, associate, or accomplice.
2. a group or company.
3. one of the ten divisions of a Roman legion.
4. any group of soldiers or warriors.
5. a group of persons sharing a particular statistical or demographic characteristic.
6. an individual in a population of the same species.
[1475–85; < Middle French cohorte < Latin cohort-, s. of cohors farmyard, armed force]
usage: Emphasizing the idea of companionship or aid, cohort has come to signify a single individual - whether friend, supporter, or accomplice. This use is sometimes objected to, although it is now common.

Cohort

 a division in the Roman army; a band of warriors. See also band, company.
Examples: cohort of acquaintances, 1719; of bright cherubim, 1667; of Christian fathers, 1858; of infantry, 1489; of priests, 1874; of social regenerators, 1871; of warriors, 1500.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cohort - a company of companions or supporters
company - a social gathering of guests or companions; "the house was filled with company when I arrived"
2.cohort - a band of warriors (originally a unit of a Roman Legion)
band, circle, lot, set - an unofficial association of people or groups; "the smart set goes there"; "they were an angry lot"
3.cohort - a group of people having approximately the same agecohort - a group of people having approximately the same age
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"
aged, elderly - people who are old collectively; "special arrangements were available for the aged"
youth, young - young people collectively; "rock music appeals to the young"; "youth everywhere rises in revolt"

cohort

noun
1. (Chiefly U.S.) supporter, partner, associate, mate, assistant, follower, comrade, protagonist, accomplice, sidekick (slang), henchman Drake and his cohorts were not pleased at my promotion.
2. group, set, band, contingent, batch We now have results for the first cohort of pupils to be assessed.

cohort

noun
1. One who is united in a relationship with another:
2. One who supports and adheres to another:
Translations
مَجْموعَه، كَتيبَه
kohortaskupina
skare
flokkur, hópur; áhangendahópur
būrysgauja
cilvēku grupakohorta

cohort

[ˈkəʊhɔːt] Ncohorte f

cohort

[ˈkəʊhɔːrt] n
(= group) → groupe m
(= supporter) → acolyte m

cohort

nKohorte f, → Trupp m

cohort

[ˈkəʊhɔːt] n (Mil) → coorte f

cohort

(ˈkouhoːt) noun
a group of people. She has cohorts of admirers.
References in classic literature ?
He ceas'd; and th' Archangelic Power prepar'd For swift descent, with him the Cohort bright Of watchful Cherubim; four faces each Had, like a double JANUS, all thir shape Spangl'd with eyes more numerous then those Of ARGUS, and more wakeful then to drouze, Charm'd with ARCADIAN Pipe, the Pastoral Reed Of HERMES, or his opiate Rod.
Numbers of artists had arranged to go, accompanied by a whole cohort of models and pupils, who, by midnight, began to create a tremendous din.
Whether marching amid his aides and marshals in the van of countless cohorts that endlessly streamed it over the plains, like an Ohio; or whether with his circumambient subjects browsing all around at the horizon, the White Steed gallopingly reviewed them with warm nostrils reddening through his cool milkiness; in whatever aspect he presented himself, always to the bravest Indians he was the object of trembling reverence and awe.
A girl of the painted cohorts of the city went along the street.
For example, because we've learned that users downloading travel apps also download utility apps they'll need on their trip, such as navigators, maps, and trip planners, we're able to use our predictive algorithms to offer more relevant app recommendations based on Actionable Cohort Analysis.
5 microns--dropped by 40 percent for the most recent cohort compared to the first cohort of children.
Risk-based screening for HCV has been recommended, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently recommended birth cohort screening of people born between 1945 and 1965, the so-called baby boomers, Dr.
3 percent) diagnoses of prostate cancer in cohort 1, there were five (1.
The Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS) at the Institute of Education, University of London (UK) is seeking tenders from suitably qualified providers to supply accelerometers for the 6th wave of the Millennium Cohort Study.
Associations of glycemic index and load with coronary heart disease events; a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective cohorts.
Results: This evaluation found that of the participants, 56% in the older cohort and 30% in the younger cohort had [greater than or equal to]1 limitation.
The first interesting finding was that the chance of surviving from birth to 93 years was 28% higher in the 1915 cohort than in the 1905 cohort and the chance of reaching 95 years was 32% higher in the 1915 cohort.