coin


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coin

 (koin)
n.
1. A small piece of metal, usually flat and circular, authorized by a government for use as money.
2. Metal money considered as a whole.
3. A flat circular piece or object felt to resemble metal money: a pizza topped with coins of pepperoni.
4. A mode of expression considered standard: Two-word verbs are valid linguistic coin in the 20th century.
5. Variant of quoin.
tr.v. coined, coin·ing, coins
1. To make (pieces of money) from metal; mint or strike: coined silver dollars.
2. To make pieces of money from (metal): coin gold.
3. To devise (a new word or phrase).
adj.
Requiring one or more pieces of metal money for operation: a coin washing machine.
Idiom:
the other side of the coin
One of two differing or opposing views or sides.

[Middle English, from Old French, die for stamping coins, wedge, from Latin cuneus, wedge.]

coin′a·ble adj.
coin′er n.

coin

(kɔɪn)
n
1. a metal disc or piece used as money
2. (Currencies) metal currency, as opposed to securities, paper currency, etc.
3. (Architecture) architect a variant spelling of quoin
4. pay someone back in his or her own coin to treat a person in the way that he or she has treated others
5. the other side of the coin the opposite view of a matter
vb
6. (Currencies) (tr) to make or stamp (coins)
7. (Currencies) (tr) to make into a coin
8. (tr) to fabricate or invent (words, etc)
9. (tr) informal to make (money) rapidly (esp in the phrase coin it in)
10. to coin a phrase said ironically after one uses a cliché
[C14: from Old French: stamping die, from Latin cuneus wedge]
ˈcoinable adj
ˈcoiner n

coin

(kɔɪn)

n.
1. a piece of metal stamped and issued by the authority of a government for use as money.
2. a number of such pieces.
3. Informal. money; cash.
adj.
5. operated by or containing machines operated by the insertion of a coin or coins.
v.t.
6. to make (coins) by stamping metal.
7. to convert (metal) into money.
8. to invent; fabricate: to coin an expression.
Idioms:
pay someone back in his or her own coin, to retaliate against someone by using the person's own methods.
[1300–50; Middle English coyn(e),coygne < Anglo-French; Middle French coin, wedge, corner, die < Latin cuneus wedge]
coin′a•ble, adj.
coin′er, n.

coin


Past participle: coined
Gerund: coining

Imperative
coin
coin
Present
I coin
you coin
he/she/it coins
we coin
you coin
they coin
Preterite
I coined
you coined
he/she/it coined
we coined
you coined
they coined
Present Continuous
I am coining
you are coining
he/she/it is coining
we are coining
you are coining
they are coining
Present Perfect
I have coined
you have coined
he/she/it has coined
we have coined
you have coined
they have coined
Past Continuous
I was coining
you were coining
he/she/it was coining
we were coining
you were coining
they were coining
Past Perfect
I had coined
you had coined
he/she/it had coined
we had coined
you had coined
they had coined
Future
I will coin
you will coin
he/she/it will coin
we will coin
you will coin
they will coin
Future Perfect
I will have coined
you will have coined
he/she/it will have coined
we will have coined
you will have coined
they will have coined
Future Continuous
I will be coining
you will be coining
he/she/it will be coining
we will be coining
you will be coining
they will be coining
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coining
you have been coining
he/she/it has been coining
we have been coining
you have been coining
they have been coining
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coining
you will have been coining
he/she/it will have been coining
we will have been coining
you will have been coining
they will have been coining
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coining
you had been coining
he/she/it had been coining
we had been coining
you had been coining
they had been coining
Conditional
I would coin
you would coin
he/she/it would coin
we would coin
you would coin
they would coin
Past Conditional
I would have coined
you would have coined
he/she/it would have coined
we would have coined
you would have coined
they would have coined
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coin - a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as moneycoin - a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as money
head - (usually plural) the obverse side of a coin that usually bears the representation of a person's head; "call heads or tails!"
obverse - the side of a coin or medal bearing the principal stamp or design
verso, reverse - the side of a coin or medal that does not bear the principal design
tail - (usually plural) the reverse side of a coin that does not bear the representation of a person's head
coinage, metal money, mintage, specie - coins collectively
change - coins of small denomination regarded collectively; "he had a pocketful of change"
bawbee - an old Scottish coin of little value
bezant, bezzant, byzant, solidus - a gold coin of the Byzantine Empire; widely circulated in Europe in the Middle Ages
denier - any of various former European coins of different denominations
ducat - formerly a gold coin of various European countries
real - an old small silver Spanish coin
piece of eight - an old silver Spanish coin; worth 8 reales
shilling - an English coin worth one twentieth of a pound
crown - an English coin worth 5 shillings
half crown - an English coin worth half a crown
dime - a United States coin worth one tenth of a dollar
nickel - a United States coin worth one twentieth of a dollar
quarter - a United States or Canadian coin worth one fourth of a dollar; "he fed four quarters into the slot machine"
fifty-cent piece, half dollar - a United States coin worth half of a dollar
halfpenny, ha'penny - an English coin worth half a penny
cent, centime, penny - a coin worth one-hundredth of the value of the basic unit
slug - a counterfeit coin
tenpence - a decimal coin worth ten pennies
tuppence, twopence - a former United Kingdom silver coin; United Kingdom bronze decimal coin worth two pennies
threepence - former cupronickel coin of the United Kingdom equal to three pennies
fourpence, groat - a former English silver coin worth four pennies
fivepence - a coin worth five cents
sixpence, tanner - a small coin of the United Kingdom worth six pennies; not minted since 1970
eightpence - a coin worth eight pennies
ninepence - a coin worth nine pennies
dollar - a United States coin worth one dollar; "the dollar coin has never been popular in the United States"
double eagle - a former gold coin in the United States worth 20 dollars
eagle - a former gold coin in the United States worth 10 dollars
half eagle - a former gold coin in United States worth 5 dollars
guinea - a former British gold coin worth 21 shillings
farthing - a former British bronze coin worth a quarter of a penny
doubloon - a former Spanish gold coin
louis d'or - a former French gold coin
medallion - any of various large ancient Greek coins
stater - any of the various silver or gold coins of ancient Greece
sou - a former French coin of low denomination; often used of any small amount of money; "he hasn't a sou to his name"
Maundy money - specially minted silver coins that are distributed by the British sovereign on Maundy Thursday
Verb1.coin - make up; "coin phrases or words"
create verbally - create with or from words
sloganeer - coin new slogans
2.coin - form by stamping, punching, or printingcoin - form by stamping, punching, or printing; "strike coins"; "strike a medal"

coin

noun
1. money, change, cash, silver, copper, dosh (Brit. & Austral. slang), specie, wonga (slang) His pocket was full of coins.
verb
1. invent, create, make up, frame, forge, conceive, originate, formulate, fabricate, think up The phrase `cosmic ray' was coined by R. A. Millikan in 1925.
Related words
adjective nummary
enthusiast numismatist
Translations
عُمْلَة مَعْدِنِيَّةقِطْعَةُ نَقْد مَعْدَنييَصوغُ كلمةً أو عِبارَةًيَضْرِبُ عِمْلَةً
mincerazitvytvořit
møntudstede møntdanne
monero
kolikko
kovanicanovčićžeton
érme
búa tilmyntslá mynt
硬貨
동전
moneta
monetamonetosnukaltisistemakaldinti
darinātkaltmonēta
monedă
kovanec
myntmynta
เหรียญ
madeni paramadeni para basmakuydurmakbulmak
tiền xu

coin

[kɔɪn]
A. Nmoneda f
a 20p coinuna moneda de 20 peniques
to toss a coinechar una moneda al aire, jugárselo a cara o cruz
to pay sb back in his own coinpagar a algn en or con la misma moneda
B. VT [+ money] → acuñar (fig) [+ word] → inventar, acuñar
he must be coining moneydebe de estar haciéndose de oro
to coin a phrase (hum) → para decirlo así, si me permite la frase

coin

[ˈkɔɪn]
n
(= piece of money) → pièce f de monnaie
a 2 euro coin → une pièce de deux euros
the other side of the coin (= negative aspect) → le revers de la médaille (= positive aspect) → le bon côté de la chose
to be two sides of the same coin → être les deux facettes d'un même problème
(= coinage) → monnaie f
vt [+ word] → inventer
... to coin a phrase ... → ... comme on dit ...

coin

n
Münze f
no plMünzen pl; in the coin of the realmin der Landeswährung; I’ll pay you back in the same coin (Brit fig) → das werde ich dir in gleicher Münze heimzahlen; the other side of the coin (fig)die Kehrseite der Medaille; they are two sides of the same coindas sind zwei Seiten derselben Sache
vt (lit, fig) money, phraseprägen; he’s coining money or it (in) (fig inf)er scheffelt Geld (inf); …, to coin a phrase…, um mich mal so auszudrücken

coin

[kɔɪn]
1. nmoneta
a 5p coin → una moneta da 5 pence
2. vt (fam) (money) → fare soldi a palate (fig) (word) → coniare
to coin a phrase (hum) → per così dire

coin

(koin) noun
a piece of metal used as money. a handful of coins.
verb
1. to make metal into (money). The new country soon started to coin its own money.
2. to invent (a word, phrase etc). The scientist coined a word for the new process.
ˈcoinage (-nidʒ) noun
1. the process of coining.
2. the money (system) used in a country. Britain now uses decimal coinage.

coin

عُمْلَة مَعْدِنِيَّة mince mønt Münze νόμισμα moneda kolikko pièce kovanica moneta 硬貨 동전 muntstuk mynt moneta moeda монета mynt เหรียญ madeni para tiền xu 硬币
References in classic literature ?
From his trousers pockets he took a fistful of crumpled bank notes and a good deal of silver coin, which he piled on the bureau indiscriminately with keys, knife, handkerchief, and whatever else happened to be in his pockets.
No matter for the money," said she, giving him a little push towards the door; for her old gentility was contumaciously squeamish at sight of the copper coin, and, besides, it seemed such pitiful meanness to take the child's pocket-money in exchange for a bit of stale gingerbread.
Why should he work for his living here, or go to dig gold in California, when he is so soon to be made happy, at monthly intervals, with a little pile of glittering coin out of his Uncle's pocket?
When he halted before the binnacle, with his glance fastened on the pointed needle in the compass, that glance shot like a javelin with the pointed intensity of his purpose; and when resuming his walk he again paused before the mainmast, then, as the same riveted glance fastened upon the riveted gold coin there, he still wore the same aspect of nailed firmness, only dashed with a certain wild longing, if not hopefulness.
The doctor was there for the reason that in all such crowds there were many people who only imagined something was the matter with them, and many who were consciously sound but wanted the immortal honor of fleshly contact with a king, and yet others who pretended to illness in order to get the piece of coin that went with the touch.
Without deigning to look at me at all, she languidly lifted the coin and bit it
There was one very strong argument in favor of this idea -- namely, that the quantity of coin he had seen was too vast to be real.
If she did, she need not coin her smiles so lavishly, flash her glances so unremittingly, manufacture airs so elaborate, graces so multitudinous.
He threw out a gold coin for the valet to pick up, and all the heads craned forward that all the eyes might look down at it as it fell.
a little nearer' than he used to be, always resorted to this same device before producing a single coin from his store; and that he endured unheard-of agonies in crawling out of bed alone, and taking it from that unlucky box.
That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else's manufacture, is reasonable enough; but that I should knowingly reckon the spurious coin of my own make, as good money
Tell me, good fellow,'' said he to Wamba, and seconded his speech by a small piece of silver coin, ``the way to Cedric the Saxon's; you cannot be ignorant of it, and it is your duty to direct the wanderer even when his character is less sanctified than ours.