coinhere

coinhere

(ˌkəʊɪnˈhɪə)
vb (intr)
to inhere together
References in periodicals archive ?
Toren in particular shows how relations of equality and those of hierarchy coinhere and transform into one another through an array of material, spatial, and social practices, including within the spaces of Fijian Methodism.
By the sheer force of their wills, Stanhope and Pauline are able to coinhere and actualize the substitutionary power of universal laws.
Margaret accepts every fact surrounding her soul, her life, and her circumstances and, therefore, coinheres with the universe at large.
From an Orthodox point of view, these two fields do not exclude each other but coinhere harmoniously, although this opinion may seem risky.
Tolkien faces, therefore, the crucial problem for the Christian writer--the problem faced first by Milton in a modern context--of formulating a vision in which Christian assertion, history, and imagination can coinhere.
41) In other words, there can be a sharing in being, because in God the "one" and "many" coinhere.
Spirit and earth internally condition and permeate one another; both modes of being coinhere through and with one another without collapsing into undifferentiated sameness or equivalence.
Father, Son, and Spirit coinhere in the Godhead as the faculties of memory, intellect, and will coinhere in the human mind.
This echoes Burke's distinction between dialectic--opposing terms--and hierarchical or transformational dialectic, in which two antithetical terms can combine or coinhere to approach transcendence.
The unique personhood of Each coinheres in the Others just as the personhood of the Others interpenetrates perichoretically in Each.
Consistent with this interpretation is the recognition that the imperative coinheres with the indicative.