colander


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colander

col·an·der

 (kŏl′ən-dər, kŭl′-)
n.
A bowl-shaped kitchen utensil with perforations for draining off liquids and rinsing food.

[Middle English colyndore; probably from a Romance source akin to Old Provençal colador, strainer, from Vulgar Latin *cōlātōr, from Latin cōlātus, past participle of cōlāre, to strain; see percolate.]

colander

(ˈkɒləndə; ˈkʌl-) or

cullender

n
(Cookery) a pan with a perforated bottom for straining or rinsing foods
[C14 colyndore, probably from Old Provençal colador, via Medieval Latin, from Late Latin cōlāre to filter, from Latin cōlum sieve]

col•an•der

(ˈkʌl ən dər, ˈkɒl-)

n.
a usu. metal container with a perforated bottom and sides, for draining and straining foods.
[1400–50; late Middle English colyndore, perhaps « Latin cōlā(re) to strain]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colander - bowl-shaped strainercolander - bowl-shaped strainer; used to wash or drain foods
strainer - a filter to retain larger pieces while smaller pieces and liquids pass through
Translations
مِصْفاةمِصْفاه
cedník
dørslagsalatslynge
lävikkö
cjedilo
szûrõedény
sáld; sigti
水切り
여과기
koštuvas
caurduris
durkslag
กระชอน
cái chao

colander

[ˈkʌləndəʳ] Ncolador m, escurridor m

colander

[ˈkɒləndər] npassoire f

colander

nSeiher m, → Sieb nt

colander

[ˈkʌləndəʳ] ncolapasta m inv

colander

(ˈkaləndə) noun
a bowl with small holes in it for draining water off vegetables.

colander

مِصْفاة cedník dørslag Sieb σουρωτήρι escurridor lävikkö passoire cjedilo colino 水切り 여과기 vergiet dørslag cedzak escorredor дуршлаг durkslag กระชอน süzgeç cái chao 漏锅
References in classic literature ?
At the bottom of the immense cavity burrowed hundreds of small extinguished craters, riddling the soil like a colander, and overlooked by a peak
All the while I was eating, and after that when I was drinking the punch, I could scarce come to believe in my good fortune; and the house, though it was thick with the peat-smoke and as full of holes as a colander, seemed like a palace.
These things were crowded with utensils of all sorts: frying pans, sauce pans, kettles, forks, knives, basting and soup spoons, nutmeg graters, sifters, colanders, meat saws, flat irons, rolling pins and many other things of a like nature.
Lindsay Miller maintains she is a Pastafarian and, much to the annoyance of the Christian right, has been given the green light to wear the colander on her head by the Massachusetts licensing authorities.
The item featured in O Magazine was Ilvento's "Doppio Delizioso" basket which features two sauces, a pound of cold extruded gourmet pasta, two heirloom family recipe cards, and a logo flour sack towel all held in a functional colander.
METHOD: WASH tinned chick peas thoroughly under cold running water and shake dry in a colander.
Just when you think there's not much more you can do with a colander to make it stand out from other kitchen must-haves, you'll be proved wrong by this cheerful specimen GREEN COLANDER, PS15, M&s
If Middlebury College economist David Colander and theoretical physicist Roland Kupers wanted to get pro-market, government minimalists like me to read their new book, then they did a good job of picking its title, Complexity and the Art of Public Policy.
Economists Colander and Kupers offer a condensed historical account of traditions of thought that lay at the intersection economics, politics, and public policy.
A MOTORIST who accused Swansea's DVLA of discrimination for rejecting his driving licence picture - because he's wearing a colander on his head - is organising protests this weekend.
Somebody at the show the other night shouted 'colander' at me, and it was deserved - we went on about that b***y colander," he grins.
Steam in a colander for 1-2 mins, then transfer to a bowl and roughly crush with a fork.