coldly


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Related to coldly: coldness

cold

 (kōld)
adj. cold·er, cold·est
1.
a. Having a low temperature: cold water.
b. Being at a temperature that is less than what is required or what is normal: cold oatmeal.
c. Chilled by refrigeration or ice: cold beer.
2.
a. Feeling no warmth; uncomfortably chilled: We were cold sitting by the drafty windows.
b. Appearing to be dead; unconscious: found him out cold on the floor.
c. Dead: was cold in his grave.
3. Lacking emotion; objective: cold logic.
4.
a. Having little appeal to the senses or feelings: a cold decor.
b. Designating or being in a tone or color, such as pale gray, that suggests little warmth.
5.
a. Not affectionate or friendly; aloof: a cold person; a cold nod.
b. Exhibiting or feeling no enthusiasm: a cold audience; a cold response to the new play; a concert that left me cold.
c. Devoid of sexual desire; frigid.
6. Having lost all freshness or vividness through passage of time: dogs attempting to catch a cold scent.
7. So intense as to be almost uncontrollable: cold fury.
8. Characterized by repeated failure, especially in a sport or competitive activity: The team fell into a slump of cold shooting.
adv.
1. To an unqualified degree; totally: was cold sober.
2. With complete finality: We turned him down cold.
3. Without advance preparation or introduction: took the exam cold and passed; walked in cold and got the new job.
n.
1.
a. Relative lack of warmth: Cold slows down chemical reactions.
b. The sensation resulting from lack of warmth; chill.
2. A condition of low air temperature; cold weather: went out into the cold and got a chill.
3. A viral infection characterized by inflammation of the mucous membranes lining the upper respiratory passages and usually accompanied by malaise, fever, chills, coughing, and sneezing. Also called common cold, coryza.
Idiom:
out in the cold
Lacking benefits given to others; neglected.

[Middle English, from Old English ceald; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

cold′ly adv.
cold′ness n.
Synonyms: cold, arctic, chilly, cool, frigid, frosty, gelid, glacial, icy
These adjectives mean marked by a low or an extremely low temperature: cold air; an arctic climate; a chilly day; cool water; a frigid room; a frosty morning; gelid seas; glacial winds; icy hands.
Antonym: hot
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.coldly - in a cold unemotional manner; "he killed her in cold blood"
Translations
بِبُرود، بِفُتور
chladně
koldtkøligt
kuldalega
hladno
soğuk soğuk

coldly

[ˈkəʊldlɪ] ADV (fig) → fríamente, con frialdad

coldly

[ˈkəʊldli] adv
[say, ask, reply] → froidement; [stare] → avec froideur
to be coldly calculating → être froid(e) et calculateur/trice

coldly

adv (lit, fig)kalt; answer, receivebetont kühl; they coldly planned the murderder Mord wurde von ihnen kaltblütig geplant

coldly

[ˈkəʊldlɪ] adv (fig) → freddamente

cold

(kəuld) adjective
1. low in temperature. cold water; cold meat and salad.
2. lower in temperature than is comfortable. I feel cold.
3. unfriendly. His manner was cold.
noun
1. the state of being cold or of feeling the coldness of one's surroundings. She has gone to live in the South of France because she cannot bear the cold in Britain; He was blue with cold.
2. an illness with running nose, coughing etc. He has a bad cold; She has caught a cold; You might catch cold.
ˈcoldly adverb
in an unfriendly way. She looked at me coldly.
ˈcoldness noun
ˌcold-ˈblooded adjective
1. having blood (like that of a fish) which takes the same temperature as the surroundings of the body. cold-blooded creatures.
2. cruel and unfeeling. cold-blooded murder.
cold war
a major, especially political, struggle between nations which involves military threats but not fighting.
get cold feet
to lose courage. I was going to apply for the job but I got cold feet.
give (someone) the cold shoulder verb (also ˌcoldˈshoulder )
to show that one is unwilling to be friendly with (a person). All the neighbours gave her the cold shoulder; He cold-shouldered all his sister's friends.
in cold blood
deliberately and unemotionally. He killed them in cold blood.
References in classic literature ?
We each are young, we each have a heart, Oh, why should we stand thus coldly apart?
I was so annoyed that I felt coldly even toward Antonia and listened unsympathetically when she told me her father was not well.
He coldly but gently loosened her fingers from about his arm and thrust the hand away from him.
Of course," she said coldly, "I won't detain you; your business must be urgent, and I forgot--at least I had forgotten until to- day--that you have other duties more important than that of squire of dames.
We won't talk of this, if you please, Uncle Venner," said Hepzibah coldly.
said another voice, coldly and sternly, proceeding from the crowd about the scaffold, "Speak; and give your child a father
Or would she turn coldly away like all the hollow world?
It's the craftiness and underhandedness of your actions that's the worst," said Miranda coldly.
The compliment was just returned, coldly and proudly; and, under indescribable irritation of spirits, she was then conveyed to Hartfield.
Teachers and pupils may look coldly on you for a day or two, but friendly feelings are concealed in their hearts; and if you persevere in doing well, these feelings will ere long appear so much the more evidently for their temporary suppression.
If Mary Lennox had been a child who was ready to be amused she would perhaps have laughed at Martha's readiness to talk, but Mary only listened to her coldly and wondered at her freedom of manner.
The one member of the audience who looked at her and listened to her coldly, was her elder sister.