collaborationism


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

col·lab·o·ra·tion·ist

 (kə-lăb′ə-rā′shə-nĭst)
n.
One that collaborates with an enemy occupation force.

col·lab′o·ra′tion·ism n.

collaborationism

an act of cooperating with an invader of one’s country. — collaborationist, n.
See also: Treason
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collaborationism - act of cooperating traitorously with an enemy that is occupying your country
cooperation - joint operation or action; "their cooperation with us was essential for the success of our mission"
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet he convincingly suggests that Petain was motivated in his collaborationism only by a kind of French nationalism, albeit one of an extremely deluded and hypocritical variety.
Redefining Fascism, Collaborationism and Resistance in France," French Historical Studies 15 (1988), 731-58; Rousso, Vichy Syndrome, pp.
Naturally, this has sparked off a heated debate within ANC ranks with accusations of defeatism, appeasement and collaborationism being routinely bandied about.
The only problem with my theory of me being the love child of Maurice Chevalier is that in 1944, a year before my birth, when the allies freed France, Chevalier was accused of collaborationism.
64) The union label, still tied to what many may understand as class collaborationism, here emphasizes a deeply rooted, even biblical injunction to the entire working class, united in solidarity, to improve its collective position in life.
To be fair, their tepidity, self-interest, and occasional acts of class collaborationism are less significant in explaining the declining power of organized labour than broader political economy changes.
Randjarv, Laine (2013) "Intellectual occupation and collaborationism in the cultural life of Estonia: reflected in the epistolary communication between Tuudur Vettik and Roland Laasmae".
A fierce debate ensued on Russian art blogs, where anybody with work in any project connected with the biennial was gravely accused of collaborationism.
Judith Keene's nu-anced analysis of the figure of American Prisoner-of-War in the Korean conflict introduces yet another complex and contested category of a historical actor--a special kind of 'contaminated' victim haunted by the spectre of collaborationism, often culturally vilified and distrusted.
As there were myriad levels of French resistance, so there were many varieties of Vichy behaviour, running (crudely put) from overt collaborationism with the Germans, to weathervane middlingness or a prudent biding of time for a 'conversion', to 'Vichy Resistance' from the get-go.
Against the class collaborationism of Social Democracy and its anti-Communist animus, the Councilist tradition was revolutionary and pre-figural.

Full browser ?