collagen

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Related to collagen fibrils: tropocollagen, procollagen

col·la·gen

 (kŏl′ə-jən)
n.
1. Any of a class of extracellular proteins that are composed of three coiled polypeptide chains, form strong fibers, and are the main constituents of cartilage, bone, and other connective tissues in animals.
2. Material composed principally of collagen proteins. Collagen is converted into gelatin when boiled in water.

[Greek kolla, glue + -gen.]

col′la·gen′ic (-jĕn′ĭk), col·lag′e·nous (kə-lăj′ə-nəs) adj.

collagen

(ˈkɒlədʒən)
n
(Biochemistry) a fibrous scleroprotein of connective tissue and bones that is rich in glycine and proline and yields gelatine on boiling
[C19: from Greek kolla glue + -gen]
collagenic, collagenous adj

col•la•gen

(ˈkɒl ə dʒən)

n.
a strongly fibrous protein that is abundant in bone, tendons, cartilage, and connective tissue, yielding gelatin when denatured by boiling.
[1860–65; < Greek kólla glue + -gen]
col•lag•e•nous (kəˈlædʒ ə nəs) adj.

col·la·gen

(kŏl′ə-jən)
The tough, fibrous protein found in bone, cartilage, skin, and other connective tissue. Collagen provides these body structures with the ability to withstand forces that stretch or lengthen them.

collagen

A fibrous protein, the chief protein constituent of connective tissue.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collagen - a fibrous scleroprotein in bone and cartilage and tendon and other connective tissue; yields gelatin on boiling
bone, os - rigid connective tissue that makes up the skeleton of vertebrates
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
cartilage, gristle - tough elastic tissue; mostly converted to bone in adults
sinew, tendon - a cord or band of inelastic tissue connecting a muscle with its bony attachment
albuminoid, scleroprotein - a simple protein found in horny and cartilaginous tissues and in the lens of the eye
Translations
kolagen
collageen

collagen

[ˈkɒlədzən] Ncolágeno m

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollagène m

collagen

[ˈkɒlədʒən] ncollageno

col·la·gen

n. colágeno, principal proteína de sostén del tejido conectivo de la piel, huesos, tendones y cartílagos.

collagen

n colágeno
References in periodicals archive ?
The EDTA acts as a stabilizer of these collagen fibrils, while the mannitol provides physiologic osmolality.
Below that, there's the dermis, This layer is a complicated matrix of connective tissue, collagen fibrils and microfibrils.
Stroma: scarring and cell apoptosis; reduced sub-basal nerve density which corresponds to reduced corneal sensation; altered collagen fibril orientation and loss of stromal collagen lamellae; abnormal cross links between collagen fibrils cause the cornea to change shape and bulge
Such changes are often associated with reduction in fibroblasts, disorganization of collagen fibrils and decreased production of collagen, elastin and other glycoproteins that provide structural support and stability to the extra cellular matrix "ECM" network.
Treatment with EDTA results in demineralization of dentin with exposed collagen fibrils that contributes to interfacial nanoleakage at the dentin-sealer interface [58].
The fascicles are a collection of collagen fibrils surrounded by an endotenon.
There was also infiltration by granulocytes, and bundles of collagen fibrils into the tumor tissue.
To investigate the three dimensional structures of the collagen fibrils in articular cartilage, full thickness canine humeral cartilage was microtomed into perpendicular sections that include the articular surface to the subchondral bone and approximately 100 successive parallel sections, each 6 pm thick.
Sulfur is important for supporting disulfide bonds between collagen fibrils helping to preserve the pliancy of our skin," said Rodney Benjamin, technical director for Bergstrom Nutrition.
For example, in an animal model study, hydrolysed collagen led to an increase in the number of dermal fibroblasts and the diameter of collagen fibrils in the ECM of the skin dermis.
Early studies by Gigante et al [14] and Heidia Eriksen et al [16] showed a correlation exists among number of collagen fibrils, size, their organization, and mechanical strength.