collateral


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Related to collateral: Collateral security

col·lat·er·al

 (kə-lăt′ər-əl)
adj.
1. Situated or running side by side; parallel.
2. Coinciding in tendency or effect; concomitant or accompanying.
3. Serving to support or corroborate: collateral evidence.
4. Of a secondary nature; subordinate: collateral target damage from a bombing run.
5. Of, relating to, or guaranteed by a security pledged against the performance of an obligation: a collateral loan.
6. Having an ancestor in common but descended from a different line.
n.
1. Property acceptable as security for a loan or other obligation.
2. A collateral relative.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin collaterālis : Latin com-, com- + Latin latus, later-, side.]

col·lat′er·al·ly adv.

collateral

(kɒˈlætərəl; kə-)
n
1. (Banking & Finance)
a. security pledged for the repayment of a loan
b. (as modifier): a collateral loan.
2. (Biology) a person, animal, or plant descended from the same ancestor as another but through a different line
adj
3. situated or running side by side
4. (Biology) descended from a common ancestor but through different lines
5. (Law) serving to support or corroborate
6. aside from the main issue
7. uniting in tendency
[C14: from Medieval Latin collaterālis, from Latin com- together + laterālis of the side, from latus side]
colˈlaterally adv

col•lat•er•al

(kəˈlæt ər əl)

n.
1. security pledged for the payment of a loan.
2. Anat.
a. a subordinate or accessory part.
b. a side branch, as of a blood vessel or nerve.
adj.
3. accompanying; auxiliary: collateral aid.
4. additional; confirming: collateral evidence.
5. secured by collateral.
6. secondary or incidental.
7. (of a relative) descended from the same stock, but in a different line.
8. situated at the side.
9. running side by side; parallel.
[1350–1400; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin collaterālis= Latin col- col-1 + laterālis lateral]
col•lat′er•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collateral - a security pledged for the repayment of a loan
security interest - any interest in a property that secures the payment of an obligation
guaranty, guarantee - a collateral agreement to answer for the debt of another in case that person defaults
Adj.1.collateral - descended from a common ancestor but through different lines; "cousins are collateral relatives"; "an indirect descendant of the Stuarts"
related - connected by kinship, common origin, or marriage
lineal, direct - in a straight unbroken line of descent from parent to child; "lineal ancestors"; "lineal heirs"; "a direct descendant of the king"; "direct heredity"
2.collateral - serving to support or corroborate; "collateral evidence"
supportive - furnishing support or assistance; "a supportive family network"; "his family was supportive of his attempts to be a writer"
3.collateral - accompany, concomitant; "collateral target damage from a bombing run"
secondary - being of second rank or importance or value; not direct or immediate; "the stone will be hauled to a secondary crusher"; "a secondary source"; "a secondary issue"; "secondary streams"
4.collateral - situated or running side by side; "collateral ridges of mountains"
parallel - being everywhere equidistant and not intersecting; "parallel lines never converge"; "concentric circles are parallel"; "dancers in two parallel rows"

collateral

noun security, guarantee, deposit, assurance, surety, pledge Many people here cannot borrow from banks because they lack collateral.

collateral

adjective
1. Lying in the same plane and not intersecting:
Idiom: side by side.
2. Giving or able to give help or support:
3. In a position of subordination:
Translations
kolaterálzajištěnízástava
panttivakuus
カタログパンフレット傍系の傍系縁者の傍系親族の
pant

collateral

[kɒˈlætərəl]
A. N
1. (Fin) → garantía f subsidiaria
2. (= person) → colateral mf
B. CPD collateral loan Npréstamo m colateral
collateral security Ngarantía f colateral

collateral

[kəˈlætərəl kɒˈlætərəl] nnantissement mcollateral damage ndommages mpl collatéraux

collateral

adj
(= connected but secondary) evidence, questions etczusätzlich, Zusatz-; eventsBegleit-
(= parallel, side by side) states etcnebeneinanderliegend; (fig) aims etcHand in Hand gehend
descent, branch of familyseitlich, kollateral (spec)
(Fin) securityzusätzlich
n (Fin) → (zusätzliche) Sicherheit

collateral

:
collateral damage
n (Mil, Pol) → Kollateralschaden m
collateral loan
n (Fin) → Lombardkredit m, → Lombarddarlehen nt
collateral security
n (Fin) → Nebensicherheit f, → Nebenbürgschaft f

collateral

[kɒˈlætrl] n (Fin) → garanzia

col·lat·er·al

a. colateral.
1. indirecto-a, subsidiario-a o accesorio-a a la cuestión principal;
2. una rama subsidiaria del axón de un nervio o vaso sanguíneo;
adv. al lado;
a. accesorio-a.

collateral

adj colateral
References in classic literature ?
I imagine it would be very difficult to carry a piano over those mountains," said Christie laughingly, to avoid the collateral of the banjo.
Though, consumed with the hot fire of his purpose, Ahab in all his thoughts and actions ever had in view the ultimate capture of Moby Dick; though he seemed ready to sacrifice all mortal interests to that one passion; nevertheless it may have been that he was by nature and long habituation far too wedded to a fiery whaleman's ways, altogether to abandon the collateral prosecution of the voyage.
Like all sea-going ship carpenters, and more especially those belonging to whaling vessels, he was, to a certain off-handed, practical extent, alike experienced in numerous trades and callings collateral to his own; the carpenter's pursuit being the ancient and outbranching trunk of all those numerous handicrafts which more or less have to do with wood as an auxiliary material.
Wragge to wade deeper and deeper into details, and to involve herself in a confusion of collateral circumstances out of which there seemed to be no prospect of her emerging for hours to come.
I had ninety pounds a year (exclusive of my house-rent and sundry collateral matters) from my aunt.
The advocates of the tinder-box-and-pedlar view considered the other side a muddle-headed and credulous set, who, because they themselves were wall-eyed, supposed everybody else to have the same blank outlook; and the adherents of the inexplicable more than hinted that their antagonists were animals inclined to crow before they had found any corn--mere skimming-dishes in point of depth--whose clear-sightedness consisted in supposing there was nothing behind a barn-door because they couldn't see through it; so that, though their controversy did not serve to elicit the fact concerning the robbery, it elicited some true opinions of collateral importance.
No need that thou Shouldst propagat, already infinite; And through all numbers absolute, though One; But Man by number is to manifest His single imperfection, and beget Like of his like, his Image multipli'd, In unitie defective, which requires Collateral love, and deerest amitie.
Can we wonder that men who felt their happiness here and their hopes of hereafter, their worldly welfare and the kingdom of heaven at stake, should sometimes attach an importance beyond their intrinsic weight to collateral points of controversy, connected with the all- involving object of the Reformation?
In the second place, it has, on another occasion, been shown that the federal legislature will not only be restrained by its dependence on its people, as other legislative bodies are, but that it will be, moreover, watched and controlled by the several collateral legislatures, which other legislative bodies are not.
It was this deficiency, I considered, while running over in thought the perfect keeping of the character of the premises with the accredited character of the people, and while speculating upon the possible influence which the one, in the long lapse of centuries, might have exercised upon the other--it was this deficiency, perhaps, of collateral issue, and the consequent undeviating transmission, from sire to son, of the patrimony with the name, which had, at length, so identified the two as to merge the original title of the estate in the quaint and equivocal appellation of the "House of Usher"--an appellation which seemed to include, in the minds of the peasantry who used it, both the family and the family mansion.
I have, therefore, availed myself occasionally of collateral lights supplied by the published journals of other travellers who have visited the scenes described: such as Messrs.
He is liable for direct damage both to your chimneys and any collateral damage caused by fall of bricks into garden, etc.