collation


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col·la·tion

(kə-lā′shən, kŏ-, kō-)
n.
1. The act or process of collating.
2.
a. A light meal permitted on fast days.
b. A light meal.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin collātiō, collātiōn-, a bringing together, from collātus, past participle of cōnferre, to bring together; see confer. Sense 2, from Middle English, evening gathering in a monastery for reading saints' lives, homilies, etc., at which a light meal was served, from Late Latin collātiōnēs, plural of collātiō, conference (perhaps specifically in Collationes patrum in scetica eremo commorantium ("Conferences with the Egyptian Hermits"), title of a work about early Christian ascetics written by St. John Cassian (c. 360-435 AD), Roman Christian monk and theologian, that was read in Benedictine monasteries to the assembled monks before compline and may have given its name to the gatherings).]

collation

(kɒˈleɪʃən; kə-)
n
1. the act or process of collating
2. (Library Science & Bibliography) a description of the technical features of a book
3. (Ecclesiastical Terms) RC Church a light meal permitted on fast days
4. (Cookery) any light informal meal
5. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the appointment of a clergyman to a benefice

col•la•tion

(kəˈleɪ ʃən, koʊ-, kɒ-)

n.
1. the act of collating; fact or result of being collated.
2. the verification of the number and order of the leaves and signatures of a volume.
3. a light meal, esp. one that may be permitted on a fast day.
4. (in a monastery) the practice of reading and conversing on the lives of the saints or the Scriptures at the close of the day.
[1175–1225; Middle English (< Anglo-French) < Medieval Latin]

collation

In intelligence usage, a step in the processing phase of the intelligence cycle in which the grouping together of related items of information provides a record of events and facilitates further processing. See also intelligence cycle.

Collation

 things brought together, as different varieties or denominations of money, of food, etc., the possessions of a person. See also contribution, hotch-potch.
Examples: collation of chicken; of food (e.g., cold collation); of money, 1382; of salad.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collation - a light informal mealcollation - a light informal meal    
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
refreshment - snacks and drinks served as a light meal
nosh - (Yiddish) a snack or light meal
coffee break, tea break - a snack taken during a break in the work day; "a ten-minute coffee break"; "the British have tea breaks"
2.collation - assembling in proper numerical or logical sequence
assembling, collecting, aggregation, collection - the act of gathering something together
3.collation - careful examination and comparison to note points of disagreement
comparing, comparison - the act of examining resemblances; "they made a comparison of noise levels"; "the fractions selected for comparison must require pupils to consider both numerator and denominator"
Translations

collation

[kəˈleɪʃən] N
1. [of texts] → cotejo m
2. (= meal) → colación f

collation

[kɒˈleɪʃən kəˈleɪʃən] n
[data] → collationnement f
(old-fashioned) (= meal) → collation f

collation

n
(= collating)Vergleich m, → Kollationieren nt; (Typ) → Kollationieren nt, → Zusammentragen nt
(form: = meal) → Imbiss m

collation

[kəˈleɪʃn] n
a. (of information) → collazione f
b. (frm) (light meal) → pasto leggero
References in classic literature ?
Elton, indeed, shewed no unwillingness to mix, and be as agreeable as they could; but during the two whole hours that were spent on the hill, there seemed a principle of separation, between the other parties, too strong for any fine prospects, or any cold collation, or any cheerful Mr.
In the country, an unpremeditated dance was very allowable; but in London, where the reputation of elegance was more important and less easily attained, it was risking too much for the gratification of a few girls, to have it known that Lady Middleton had given a small dance of eight or nine couple, with two violins, and a mere side-board collation.
He had prepared a collation for me in the Barnwell parlour, and he too ordered his shopman to "come out of the gangway" as my sacred person passed.
collation, which was given at a late hour, after the regular supper
At ten o'clock, the king's collation, consisting of preserves and other delicacies, was prepared in the little room on the side of the church of St.
In such case I should have commenced with a collation and analysis of the shorter words, and, had a word of a single letter occurred, as is most likely, (a or I, for example,) I should have considered the solution as assured.
After the business of arriving was over, it was first necessary to eat, and the doors were thrown open to admit them through one or two intermediate rooms into the appointed dining-parlour, where a collation was prepared with abundance and elegance.
The collation over, at a sign of approbation from M.
No one who knows me will doubt that the duty thus self-imposed will be executed to the best of my ability, with all that rigid impartiality, all that cautious examination into facts, and diligent collation of authorities, which should ever distinguish him who aspires to the title of historian.
Having heard us to an end, the Count proceeded to relate a few anecdotes, which rendered it evident that prototypes of Gall and Spurzheim had flourished and faded in Egypt so long ago as to have been nearly forgotten, and that the manoeuvres of Mesmer were really very contemptible tricks when put in collation with the positive miracles of the Theban savans, who created lice and a great many other similar things.
They had seen all the curiosities; they had even been to the Lido in a boat (she spoke as if I might think there was a way on foot); they had had a collation there, brought in three baskets and spread out on the grass.
The danger is not from that state, but where it hath a dependence of foreign authority; or where the churchmen come in and are elected, not by the collation of the king, or particular patrons, but by the people.