collective memory

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collective memory

n.
1. The ability of a community to remember events.
2. The collection of memories shared by a common culture.

collective memory

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the shared memories of a group, family, race, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
Young generations who live in these cities, cannot understand the collective memories through their surroundings (Siew-wailim 2000).
Nation-states are the most powerful agents who institutionalize collective memories to create a shared national identity and to ensure cohesiveness among citizens.
Fair City seriously needs to up its game if it wants to have the same impact on our collective memories.
Considerations on recent history are an inevitable reference to the defining change therein, the change that marks the beginning of recent history, and its correspondences in individual and collective memories.
These and other traditional places of pilgrimage have been consecrated by the collective memories and "bodily practices" of Christians.
What is more, the "memory boom" in Europe since 1980s (which in "young" Europe is also intertwined with the rise and further development of civil societies), results in flourishing of communities which bring up their collective memories and their own narratives to public discourses.
Personal and collective memories combine to form this novel's foundations.
Characterizing collective memories as "floating" elements, Lim explores historical responsibility and solution such as keeping a veil of silence on what was considered a shameful past.
In light of the sources from which the different generations of Spaniards acquired knowledge about their history and the way in which their national identity and collective memories were forged, it is normal that different sections of Spanish society have some distrust to and dislike of Moroccans.
I have not discovered where collective memories are stored, but I think I have learned what they are made of.
A story of growing up in refuge from one of the most brutal dictators of the 20th century, "Afterimages: A Family Memoir" is the collective memories of a family who grew up in Topeka, Kansas after their parents fled Hitler's Germany in fear.
The introduction also discusses the connection between individual and collective memories and the relevance of psychological models as analytical tools as well as the term "institutional memory" as an alternative to "collective memory.
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