collective memory


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collective memory

n.
1. The ability of a community to remember events.
2. The collection of memories shared by a common culture.

collective memory

n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) the shared memories of a group, family, race, etc
References in periodicals archive ?
I would like you to know that your recognition of Macedonia under its constitutional name and your personal support at the NATO summit in Bucharest in 2008 will stay forever in Macedonia's collective memory," said PM Gruevski.
The sacrifice of your sons, daughters and wards is etched in the collective memory of nations consciousness, never to be erased.
This is a symbolic act and a message to those who attack our collective memory, this seat of learning, science and history," also said the Minister of Culture at a press conference at Bardo Museum, in the presence of government members.
Finally, Vatican II introduced the language of collective memory when it confirmed the importance of the "memorial days" of the martyrs and other saints (Sacrosanctum concilium no.
Erol Rizaov in Utrinski vesnik comments that the names of the people who participated in these crimes staging imprisonments, trials and torture of their compatriot political opponents must remain eternally in the collective memory of the citizens.
His work should, however, not be reduced to a pure manifestation of the workings of collective memory.
Over the past six decades, Jewish Israelis have virtually dominated the reconstruction of the collective memory of 1948.
Collective memory as a popular concept in the contemporary social studies stems mainly from the landmark study of Maurice Halbwachs, The Social Frameworks of Memory (1925), in which he stated that "It is in society that people normally acquire their memories.
In his words, this exhibition was a sample of the struggle aiming at consecrating Palestine in the collective memory of the Arab population, regardless of the measures taken by Israel to prevent Palestinians from obtaining their rights.
She introduces this volume with discussion of the construction of a collective memory of the Holocaust and then proceeds to a detailed look at Holocaust museums in Israel, the US, and Europe.
Tel: 029 2023 9253 Indre Serpytyte Ffotogallery, Turner House, Penarth, 11am-5pm Tickets: Free Photography exploring themes of history, individual and collective memory and loss.
Many aspects related to memory studies are not covered but this may be a way to avoid becoming too dispersed, as the articles in the volume concern in particular relations with traumatic pasts and the way this past is reconstructed and integrated into the present in the form narrative structures and collective memory.
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