collective unconscious


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Related to collective unconscious: Carl Jung

collective unconscious

n.
In Jungian psychology, a part of the unconscious mind, shared by a society, a people, or all humankind, that is the product of ancestral experience.

collective unconscious

n
(Psychology) (in Jungian psychological theory) a part of the unconscious mind incorporating patterns of memories, instincts, and experiences common to all mankind. These patterns are inherited, may be arranged into archetypes, and are observable through their effects on dreams, behaviour, etc

collec′tive uncon′scious


n.
(in Jungian psychology) inborn unconscious psychic material common to humankind, accumulated by the experience of all preceding generations.
Compare archetype (def. 2).

collective unconscious

In the psychology of Carl Jung, an area of the unconscious mind that all members of a society share, including instincts and religious feelings.
References in periodicals archive ?
In his 1988 Harper's magazine essay, "The Reason for Stories," novelist Robert Stone argued that fiction does for the collective unconscious of a culture what dreams do for our individual psyches.
Going deep into the mysterious woods can represent our collective unconscious where we must go to face our fears, as well as grow and become mature adults.
They are naturally in touch with the collective unconscious, and will develop their own deeper understanding without explicit morals or didactic explanations.
Jung proposed and developed the concepts of extraversion and introversion; archetypes, and the collective unconscious.
This Friday talk will explore the relationship between the creator and the creative process in light of Jung's concept of the collective unconscious and its denizens-the archetypes.
It invites us to imagine that we humans are yearning for home, expressing a collective unconscious desire to return to our ancestral roots.
From discussions of the collective unconscious to reclaiming extrasensory abilities, this offers a full-faceted coverage especially recommended for new age holdings.
Why, then, do they occupy the collective unconscious of nearly all seafaring peoples?
It's an apt description of Mary Beth Edelson's exploration of the collective unconscious in the terrific "22 Others, 1973": What do we make of images that keep coming to us, and how do we make ourselves continue to see new things, even forty years on?
Sonu Shamdasani's introductory essay accompanies a powerful insight which synthesizes philosophy, art, psychology and literature and represents the work where Jung first developed his theories of the archetypes, collective unconscious, and more.
In the early 1900s, Jung proposed that these archetypes were ancient images stemming from humans' collective unconscious.
Lovibond has at best limited success in making the case for Murdoch as a visceral sexist and her extrapolation from Murdoch's mental life to the collective unconscious is woefully underdeveloped.