collectively


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col·lec·tive

 (kə-lĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1. Assembled into or viewed as a whole.
2. Of, relating to, characteristic of, or made by a number of people acting as a group: a collective decision.
n.
1. An undertaking, such as a business operation, set up on the principles or system of collectivism.
2. A collective noun.

col·lec′tive·ly adv.
col·lec′tive·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.collectively - in conjunction with; combined; "our salaries put together couldn't pay for the damage"; "we couldn't pay for the damages with all our salaries put together"
Translations
بِصورَةٍ جَماعِيَّه
kolektivněspolečně
fælleskollektivt
közösen
sameiginlega

collectively

[kəˈlektɪvlɪ] ADVcolectivamente

collectively

[kəˈlɛktɪvli] adv
[decide, act] → collectivement
to bargain collectively → négocier une convention de travail
[responsible] → collectivement
(= in total) → au total
[known, referred to] → généralementcollective noun n (GRAMMAR)collectif mcollective unconscious ninconscient m collectif

collectively

advgemeinsam, zusammen; (in socialist context also) → kollektiv

collectively

[kəˈlɛktɪvlɪ] advcollettivamente

collect

(kəˈlekt) verb
1. to bring or come together; to gather. People are collecting in front of the house; I collect stamps; I'm collecting (money) for cancer research; He's trying to collect his thoughts.
2. to call for and take away. She collects the children from school each day.
colˈlected adjective
1. gathered together in one book etc. the collected poems of Robert Burns.
2. composed; cool. She appeared quite calm and collected.
colˈlection (-ʃən) noun
1. (an) act of collecting. Your letter won't get to London tomorrow – you've missed the last collection (= of mail from a postbox) for today.
2. a set of objects etc collected. a stamp collection.
colˈlective (-tiv) adjective
1. of a number of people etc combined into one group. This success was the result of a collective effort.
2. of a noun, taking a singular verb but standing for many things taken as a whole. `Cattle' is a collective noun.
noun
a farm or organization run by a group of workers for the good of all of them.
colˈlectively adverb
They were collectively responsible for the man's death.
colˈlector noun
a person who collects, as a job or as a hobby. a ticket-collector / stamp-collector.
References in classic literature ?
Mademoiselle had only disagreeable things to say of the symphony concerts, and insulting remarks to make of all the musicians of New Orleans, singly and collectively.
Harrod's fort was then defended by only sixty-five men, and Boonsborough by twenty-two, there being no more forts or white men in the country, except at the Falls, a considerable distance from these, and all taken collectively, were but a handful to the numerous warriors that were every where dispersed through the country, intent upon doing all the mischief that savage barbarity could invent.
We had been, collectively, subject to an intrusion; some unscrupulous traveler, curious in old houses, had made his way in unobserved, enjoyed the prospect from the best point of view, and then stolen out as he came.
But where this superiority in the English whalemen does really consist, it would be hard to say, seeing that the Yankees in one day, collectively, kill more whales than all the English, collectively, in ten years.
Though many of the whales, as has been said, were in violent motion, yet it is to be observed that as a whole the herd neither advanced nor retreated, but collectively remained in one place.
Ignominy, Want, Despair, and Madness, have, collectively or separately, been the attendants of my career.
When England is made the property of its inhabitants collectively, England becomes socialistic.
Some days ago I became acquainted with your misfortune and the cause which impels you to take up arms again and again to revenge yourselves upon your enemies; and having many times thought over your business in my mind, I find that, according to the laws of combat, you are mistaken in holding yourselves insulted; for a private individual cannot insult an entire community; unless it be by defying it collectively as a traitor, because he cannot tell who in particular is guilty of the treason for which he defies it.
The people collectively, from their number and from their dispersed situation, cannot be regulated in their movements by that systematic spirit of cabal and intrigue, which will be urged as the chief objections to reposing the power in question in a body of men.
And firstly, if it be not entirely new, but is, as it were, a member of a state which, taken collectively, may be called composite, the changes arise chiefly from an inherent difficulty which there is in all new principalities; for men change their rulers willingly, hoping to better themselves, and this hope induces them to take up arms against him who rules: wherein they are deceived, because they afterwards find by experience they have gone from bad to worse.
But I cannot call that situation nothing which has the charge of all that is of the first importance to mankind, individually or collectively considered, temporally and eternally, which has the guardianship of religion and morals, and consequently of the manners which result from their influence.
The stranger, whom D'Artagnan saw for the first time -- for before he had only caught a glimpse of him, -- the stranger had black and brilliant eyes, a yellow complexion, a brow a little wrinkled by the weight of fifty years, bonhomie in his features collectively, but some cunning in his look.