collectivism

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col·lec·tiv·ism

 (kə-lĕk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
The principles or system of ownership and control of the means of production and distribution by the people collectively, usually under the supervision of a government.

col·lec′tiv·ist n.
col·lec′tiv·is′tic adj.
col·lec′tiv·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

collectivism

(kəˈlɛktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the principle of ownership of the means of production, by the state or the people
2. (Sociology) a social system based on this principle
colˈlectivist n
colˌlectiˈvistic adj

col•lec•tiv•ism

(kəˈlɛk təˌvɪz əm)

n.
the socialist principle of control by the people collectively, or the state, of all means of production or economic activity.
[1875–80; < French collectivisme]
col•lec′tiv•ist, n., adj.
col•lec`tiv•is′tic, adj.

collectivism

the socialist principle of control by the state of all means of productive or economic activity. — collectivist, n., adj.collectivistic, adj.
See also: Politics

collectivism

The belief that the means of production in a state should be controlled by the people.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collectivism - Soviet communismcollectivism - Soviet communism      
communism - a form of socialism that abolishes private ownership
revisionism - a moderate evolutionary form of Marxism
revisionism - any dangerous departure from the teachings of Marx
2.collectivism - a political theory that the people should own the means of production
ideology, political orientation, political theory - an orientation that characterizes the thinking of a group or nation
Translations
kolektivizam
collectivisme

collectivism

[kəˈlektɪvɪzəm] Ncolectivismo m

collectivism

[kəˈlɛktɪvɪzəm] ncollectivisme m

collectivism

collectivism

[kəˈlɛktɪvɪzm] ncollettivismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Can self-determination theory explain what underlies the productive, satisfying learning experiences of collectivistically oriented Korean students?
Can Selfdetermination Theory explain what underlies the productive, satisfying learning experiences of collectivistically oriented Korean students?
Figure 1 indicates that ontologically, according to Chen (2006), Chinese culture holds a holistic view of human communication which considers the universe a great whole in which the subject and the object are mutually interpenetrated and unified, thus people tend to submerge into the group or be collectivistically oriented in the endless and transforming process of social interaction.