collier


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Related to collier: collider

col·lier

 (kŏl′yər)
n.
1. A coal miner.
2. A coal ship.

[Middle English colier, from col, coal, from Old English.]

collier

(ˈkɒlɪə)
n
1. (Mining & Quarrying) a coal miner
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. a ship designed to transport coal
b. a member of its crew
[C14: from coal + -ier]

col•lier

(ˈkɒl yər)

n.
1. a ship for carrying coal.
2. a coal miner.
3. Obs. a person who carries or sells coal.
[1300–50; Middle English coliere]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collier - someone who works in a coal minecollier - someone who works in a coal mine  
miner, mineworker - laborer who works in a mine
Translations
عامِل في مَنْجَم
horník
kulminearbejder
szénbányászvájár
kolanámumaîur
angliakasys
ogļracis
maden kömür işçisi

collier

[ˈkɒlɪəʳ] N
1. (= miner) → minero m (de carbón)
2. (= ship) → barco m carbonero

collier

n
Bergmann m, → Kumpel m (inf)
(= coal ship)Kohlenschiff nt

collier

[ˈkɒlɪəʳ] nminatore m (di carbone)

collier

(ˈkoliə) noun
a person who works in a coalmine. Collier is another word for a coalminer.
ˈcollieryplural ˈcollieries noun
a coalmine.
References in classic literature ?
The floor's mortal cold, and the damp sticks to the place like cockroaches to a collier.
It was very cold, and, a collier coming by us, with her galley-fire smoking and flaring, looked like a comfortable home.
As soon as his wife had inherited a house and enough to live on(from a bachelor uncle who had made some money in the coal business) he threw up his command of an East-coast collier with a feeling as though he had escaped from the galleys.
I knew a nobleman in England, that had the greatest audits of any man in my time; a great grazier, a great sheep-master, a great timber man, a great collier, a great corn-master, a great lead-man, and so of iron, and a number of the like points of husbandry.
Twice Strickland refused a berth on tramps sailing for the United States, and once on a collier going to Newcastle.
Well, anyway, it ain't so many years ago that I came ambling in there on a rusty, foul-bottomed, tramp collier from Australia, forty-three days from land to land.
The growing indignation was voiced from time to time in published protests, of which the last, in 1698, was the over-zealous but powerful 'Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage' by Jeremy Collier, which carried the more weight because the author was not a Puritan but a High-Church bishop and partisan of the Stuarts.
Now, Pa, in the character of owner of a lumbering square-sailed collier, was tacking away to Newcastle, to fetch black diamonds to make his fortune with; now, Pa was going to China in that handsome threemasted ship, to bring home opium, with which he would for ever cut out Chicksey Veneering and Stobbles, and to bring home silks and shawls without end for the decoration of his charming daughter.
I had not sat five minutes by the coffee-room fire, when the waiter, coming to stir it, as an excuse for talking, told me that two colliers had gone down, with all hands, a few miles away; and that some other ships had been seen labouring hard in the Roads, and trying, in great distress, to keep off shore.
Close inshore was a multitude of fishing smacks--English, Scotch, French, Dutch, and Swedish; steam launches from the Thames, yachts, electric boats; and beyond were ships of large burden, a multitude of filthy colliers, trim merchantmen, cattle ships, passenger boats, petroleum tanks, ocean tramps, an old white transport even, neat white and grey liners from Southampton and Hamburg; and along the blue coast across the Blackwater my brother could make out dimly a dense swarm of boats chaffering with the people on the beach, a swarm which also extended up the Blackwater almost to Maldon.
That Master Kirby is no first-rate in a boat; but he’ll tack a cart among the stumps, all the same as a Lon’on pilot will back and fill, through the colliers in the Pool.
It reminded Philip of the dirty little harbour with its colliers at Blackstable, and he thought that there he had first acquired the desire, which was now an obsession, for Eastern lands and sunlit islands in a tropic sea.