collier

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col·lier

 (kŏl′yər)
n.
1. A coal miner.
2. A coal ship.

[Middle English colier, from col, coal, from Old English.]

collier

(ˈkɒlɪə)
n
1. (Mining & Quarrying) a coal miner
2. (Nautical Terms)
a. a ship designed to transport coal
b. a member of its crew
[C14: from coal + -ier]

col•lier

(ˈkɒl yər)

n.
1. a ship for carrying coal.
2. a coal miner.
3. Obs. a person who carries or sells coal.
[1300–50; Middle English coliere]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.collier - someone who works in a coal minecollier - someone who works in a coal mine  
miner, mineworker - laborer who works in a mine
Translations
عامِل في مَنْجَم
horník
kulminearbejder
szénbányászvájár
kolanámumaîur
angliakasys
ogļracis
maden kömür işçisi

collier

[ˈkɒlɪəʳ] N
1. (= miner) → minero m (de carbón)
2. (= ship) → barco m carbonero

collier

n
Bergmann m, → Kumpel m (inf)
(= coal ship)Kohlenschiff nt

collier

[ˈkɒlɪəʳ] nminatore m (di carbone)

collier

(ˈkoliə) noun
a person who works in a coalmine. Collier is another word for a coalminer.
ˈcollieryplural ˈcollieries noun
a coalmine.
References in classic literature ?
Of barges, sailing colliers, and coasting traders, there were perhaps as many as now; but, of steam-ships, great and small, not a tithe or a twentieth part so many.
I had not sat five minutes by the coffee-room fire, when the waiter, coming to stir it, as an excuse for talking, told me that two colliers had gone down, with all hands, a few miles away; and that some other ships had been seen labouring hard in the Roads, and trying, in great distress, to keep off shore.
It reminded Philip of the dirty little harbour with its colliers at Blackstable, and he thought that there he had first acquired the desire, which was now an obsession, for Eastern lands and sunlit islands in a tropic sea.
Close inshore was a multitude of fishing smacks--English, Scotch, French, Dutch, and Swedish; steam launches from the Thames, yachts, electric boats; and beyond were ships of large burden, a multitude of filthy colliers, trim merchantmen, cattle ships, passenger boats, petroleum tanks, ocean tramps, an old white transport even, neat white and grey liners from Southampton and Hamburg; and along the blue coast across the Blackwater my brother could make out dimly a dense swarm of boats chaffering with the people on the beach, a swarm which also extended up the Blackwater almost to Maldon.
That Master Kirby is no first-rate in a boat; but he’ll tack a cart among the stumps, all the same as a Lon’on pilot will back and fill, through the colliers in the Pool.
While this was doing the master, seeing some light colliers, who, not able to ride out the storm were obliged to slip and run away to sea, and would come near us, ordered to fire a gun as a signal of distress.
Near to that part of the Thames on which the church at Rotherhithe abuts, where the buildings on the banks are dirtiest and the vessels on the river blackest with the dust of colliers and the smoke of close-built low-roofed houses, there exists the filthiest, the strangest, the most extraordinary of the many localities that are hidden in London, wholly unknown, even by name, to the great mass of its inhabitants.
From the accounts the poisonous effect begins with mental excitement; the rioting in Paris this morning is said to have been very violent, and the Welsh colliers are in a state of uproar.
It was high water, blowing fresh with a drizzle; the double dock- gates were opened, and the steam colliers were going in and out in the darkness with their lights burning bright, a great plashing of propellers, rattling of winches, and a lot of hailing on the pier-heads.
I knew a nobleman in England, that had the greatest audits of any man in my time; a great grazier, a great sheep-master, a great timber man, a great collier, a great corn-master, a great lead-man, and so of iron, and a number of the like points of husbandry.
Twice Strickland refused a berth on tramps sailing for the United States, and once on a collier going to Newcastle.
The growing indignation was voiced from time to time in published protests, of which the last, in 1698, was the over-zealous but powerful 'Short View of the Immorality and Profaneness of the English Stage' by Jeremy Collier, which carried the more weight because the author was not a Puritan but a High-Church bishop and partisan of the Stuarts.