colonel


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colo·nel

 (kûr′nəl)
n.
1.
a. A commissioned rank in the US Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps that is above lieutenant colonel and below brigadier general.
b. One who holds this rank or a similar rank in another military organization.
2. An honorary nonmilitary title awarded by some states of the United States.

[Alteration of obsolete coronel, from French, from Old Italian colonello, from diminutive of colonna, column of soldiers, from Latin columna, column; see kel- in Indo-European roots.]

colo′nel·cy, colo′nel·ship′ n.

colonel

(ˈkɜːnəl)
n
(Military) an officer of land or air forces junior to a brigadier but senior to a lieutenant colonel
[C16: via Old French, from Old Italian colonnello column of soldiers, from colonna column]
ˈcolonelcy, ˈcolonelˌship n

colo•nel

(ˈkɜr nl)

n.
1. an officer in the U.S. Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps ranking above lieutenant colonel.
2. a commissioned officer of similar rank in other nations.
3. Southern U.S.
a. an honorary title bestowed by some states, esp. on visiting dignitaries.
b. (formerly) a title of respect for an elderly man.
[1540–50; < Middle French < Italian colon(n)ello=colonn(a) column + -ello < Latin -ellus diminutive suffix; so named because such an officer orig. headed the first column or company of a regiment]
colo′nel•cy, n.
pron: colonel (ˈkɜr nl) with its medial l pronounced as (r), illustrates one source for the apparent vagaries of English spelling: divergence between a word's orthographic development and its established pronunciation. In this case, English borrowed from French two variant forms of the same word, one pronounced with medial and final (l), and a second reflecting dissimilation of the first (l) to (r). After a period of competition, the dissimilated form triumphed in pronunciation, while the spelling colonel became the orthographic standard.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colonel - a commissioned military officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines who ranks above a lieutenant colonel and below a brigadier generalcolonel - a commissioned military officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines who ranks above a lieutenant colonel and below a brigadier general
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
commissioned military officer - a commissioned officer in the Army or Air Force or Marine Corps
lieutenant colonel, light colonel - a commissioned officer in the United States Army or Air Force or Marines holding a rank above major and below colonel
Translations
عَقيدعَقِيد
plukovník
oberst
eversti
pukovnik
ezredes
ofursti
大佐
육군 대령
pulkininkas
pulkvedis
plukovník
polkovnik
överste
พันเอก
đại tá

colonel

[ˈkɜːnl] Ncoronel m

colonel

[ˈkɜːrnəl] ncolonel m

colonel

nOberst m; (as address) → Herr Oberst

colonel

[ˈkɜːnl] ncolonnello

colonel

(ˈkəːnl) noun
(often abbreviated to Col . when written) an army officer in charge of a regiment.

colonel

عَقِيد plukovník oberst Oberst συνταγματάρχης coronel eversti colonel pukovnik colonnello 大佐 육군 대령 kolonel oberst pułkownik coronel полковник överste พันเอก albay đại tá 陆军上校
References in classic literature ?
Daisy March--father a colonel in the army--one of our first families, but reverses of fortune, you know; intimate friends of the Laurences; sweet creature, I assure you; my Ned is quite wild about her.
Lena's landlord, old Colonel Raleigh, had given her the dog, and at first she was not at all pleased.
He had been a colonel in the Confederate army, and still maintained, with the title, the military bearing which had always accompanied it.
You are not now to learn my opinion of your daughters, Colonel Munro.
But the hired men--the superintendent and his workmen--were the only ones who ever got anything out of your last experience with Colonel Waters at La Grange, and--and we at least lived among civilized people there.
Colonel Pyncheon, the claimant, as we gather from whatever traits of him are preserved, was characterized by an iron energy of purpose.
He might truly be termed a legitimate son of the revenue system, dyed in the wool, or rather born in the purple; since his sire, a Revolutionary colonel, and formerly collector of the port, had created an office for him, and appointed him to fill it, at a period of the early ages which few living men can now remember.
The light brougham was to be fresh done up, and as Colonel Blantyre was obliged to return to his regiment it was arranged that Smith should drive him to the town in it, and ride back; for this purpose he took the saddle with him, and I was chosen for the journey.
A common and natural result of an undue respect for the law is, that you may see a file of soldiers, colonel, captain, corporal, privates, powder-monkeys, and all, marching in admirable order over hill and dale to the wars, against their wills, ay, against their common sense and consciences, which makes it very steep marching indeed, and produces a palpitation of the heart.
She spent her military life as colonel of the Tenth Dragoons, and saw a deal of rough service - distinguished service it was, too.
The case of Colonel Valentine Baker obstructs that argument, for a man cannot become an officer in the British army except he hold the rank of gentleman.
Everybody yelled at him and laughed at him and sassed him, and he sassed back, and said he'd attend to them and lay them out in their regular turns, but he couldn't wait now because he'd come to town to kill old Colonel Sherburn, and his motto was, "Meat first, and spoon vittles to top off on.