colonist


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Related to colonist: colonialist

col·o·nist

 (kŏl′ə-nĭst)
n.
1. An original settler or founder of a colony.
2. An inhabitant of a colony.

colonist

(ˈkɒlənɪst)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a person who settles or colonizes an area
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an inhabitant or member of a colony

col•o•nist

(ˈkɒl ə nɪst)

n.
1. an inhabitant of a colony.
2. a member of a colonizing expedition.
[1695–1705, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colonist - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new countrycolonist - a person who settles in a new colony or moves into new country
migrant, migrator - traveler who moves from one region or country to another
Pilgrim Father, Pilgrim - one of the colonists from England who sailed to America on the Mayflower and founded the colony of Plymouth in New England in 1620
pioneer - one the first colonists or settlers in a new territory; "they went west as pioneers with only the possessions they could carry with them"
sourdough - a settler or prospector (especially in western United States or northwest Canada and Alaska)
homesteader, nester, squatter - someone who settles lawfully on government land with the intent to acquire title to it

colonist

noun settler, immigrant, pioneer, colonial, homesteader (U.S.), colonizer, frontiersman The apple was brought over here by the colonists when they came.
Translations
مُستَعْمِر، مُستَوْطِن
kolonistaosadník
kolonistnybygger
gyarmatos
landnemi; nÿlendubúi
sömürgecisömürgede oturan kimse

colonist

[ˈkɒlənɪst] N (= pioneer) → colonizador(a) m/f; (= inhabitant) → colono m

colonist

[ˈkɒlənɪst] ncolon m

colonist

nKolonist(in) m(f), → Siedler(in) m(f)

colonist

[ˈkɒlənɪst] ncolonizzatore/trice

colony

(ˈkoləni) plural ˈcolonies noun
1. (a group of people who form) a settlement in one country etc which is under the rule of another country. France used to have many colonies in Africa.
2. a group of people having the same interests, living close together. a colony of artists.
3. a collection of animals, birds etc, of one type, living together. a colony of gulls.
coˈlonial (-ˈlou-) adjective
Britain was formerly a colonial power.
coˈlonialism noun
coˈlonialist noun
and adjective.
ˈcolonize, ˈcolonise verb
to establish a colony in (a place). The English colonized New England in 1620.
ˈcolonist noun
ˌcoloniˈzation, ˌcoloniˈsation noun
References in classic literature ?
The hardy colonist, and the trained European who fought at his side, frequently expended months in struggling against the rapids of the streams, or in effecting the rugged passes of the mountains, in quest of an opportunity to exhibit their courage in a more martial conflict.
Among his other acts of folly Captain Kirke took a woman passenger on board at that place -- not a young woman by any means -- the elderly widow of a rich colonist.
Impey Barbicane was a man of forty years of age, calm, cold, austere; of a singularly serious and self-contained demeanor, punctual as a chronometer, of imperturbable temper and immovable character; by no means chivalrous, yet adventurous withal, and always bringing practical ideas to bear upon the very rashest enterprises; an essentially New Englander, a Northern colonist, a descendant of the old anti-Stuart Roundheads, and the implacable enemy of the gentlemen of the South, those ancient cavaliers of the mother country.
Lyell, few countries have undergone more remarkable changes, since the year 1535, when the first colonist of La Plata landed with seventy-two horses.
He had not the rich complexion of the typical colonist, being indeed peculiarly pale, but it appeared that he had been confined to his berth for the greater part of the voyage, while his prematurely gray hair was sufficient proof that the rigors of bush life had at last undermined an originally tough constitution.
Nor were sports wanting, such as the colonists had witnessed, and shared in, long ago, at the country fairs and on the village-greens of England; and which it was thought well to keep alive on this new soil, for the sake of the courage and manliness that were essential in them.
This is an argument of some value in support of the theory that they were the original colonists of the wild islands of the coast of Scotland.
The blood horses of them colonists might fling up the dust over me as I was walking; what do I say?
From the omnipotence of Parliament the colonists appealed to the rights of man and the omnipotence of the God of battles.
Till these evil times, however, such allegiance had been merely nominal, and the colonists had ruled themselves, enjoying far more freedom than is even yet the privilege of the native subjects of Great Britain.
The mention of this holy man suggested to Grandfather the propriety of giving a brief sketch of the history of the Indians, so far as they were connected with the English colonists.
The peninsula of California was settled in 1698, by the Jesuits, who, certainly, as far as the natives were concerned, have generally proved the most beneficent of colonists.