colony


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Related to colony: Bacterial colony

col·o·ny

 (kŏl′ə-nē)
n. pl. col·o·nies
1.
a. A group of emigrants or their descendants who settle in a distant territory but remain subject to or closely associated with the parent country.
b. A territory thus settled.
2. A region politically controlled by a distant country; a dependency.
3.
a. A group of people with the same interests or ethnic origin concentrated in a particular area: the American colony in Paris.
b. The area occupied by such a group.
4. Colonies The British colonies that became the original 13 states of the United States.
5. A group of people who have been institutionalized in a relatively remote area: an island penal colony.
6. A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together.
7. A visible growth of microorganisms, usually in a solid or semisolid nutrient medium.

[Middle English colonie, from Latin colōnia, from colōnus, settler, from colere, to cultivate; see kwel- in Indo-European roots.]

colony

(ˈkɒlənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a body of people who settle in a country distant from their homeland but maintain ties with it
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the community formed by such settlers
3. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a subject territory occupied by a settlement from the ruling state
4.
a. a community of people who form a national, racial, or cultural minority: an artists' colony; the American colony in London.
b. the area itself
5. (Biology) zoology
a. a group of the same type of animal or plant living or growing together, esp in large numbers
b. an interconnected group of polyps of a colonial organism
6. (Microbiology) bacteriol a group of bacteria, fungi, etc, derived from one or a few spores, esp when grown on a culture medium
[C16: from Latin colōnia, from colere to cultivate, inhabit]

col•o•ny

(ˈkɒl ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. a group of people who leave their native country to form in a new land a settlement subject to, or connected with, the parent nation.
2. the country or district so settled.
3. any people or territory separated from but subject to a ruling power.
4. the Colonies, those British colonies that formed the original 13 states of the United States.
5. a group of individuals having the same national origin or similar interests, occupations, etc., living in a particular locality: a colony of artists.
6. a group of people forced to live isolated from society, as because of disease or criminal behavior.
7. the place or dwellings inhabited by such a group.
8. an aggregation of bacteria growing together as the descendants of a single cell.
9. a group of organisms of the same kind living or growing in close association.
[1350–1400; Middle English colonie (< Middle French) < Latin colōnia <colōn(us) farmer <colere to inhabit, cultivate]

col·o·ny

(kŏl′ə-nē)
A group of the same kind of animals, plants, or one-celled organisms living or growing together: a colony of ants; a colony of bacteria.

Colony

 a group of people transported to another place or part of the world; a collection of people associated with a craft, occupation, decorative art, etc.; a number of animals or plants in a group. See also community.
Examples: colony of ants—Lipton, 1970; of artists; of auks [on land]; of avocets; of badgers; of bats; of bees, 1713; of beggars, 1737; of chinchilla; of cormorants; of frogs; of gulls; of ibises; of lepers; of mice; of monks, 1844; of musicians, 1711; of penguins; of sparrows, 1840; of voles; of vampires.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colony - a body of people who settle far from home but maintain ties with their homelandcolony - a body of people who settle far from home but maintain ties with their homeland; inhabitants remain nationals of their home state but are not literally under the home state's system of government; "the American colony in Paris"
body - a group of persons associated by some common tie or occupation and regarded as an entity; "the whole body filed out of the auditorium"; "the student body"; "administrative body"
frontier settlement, outpost - a settlement on the frontier of civilization
Plantation - a newly established colony (especially in the colonization of North America); "the practice of sending convicted criminals to serve on the Plantations was common in the 17th century"
proprietary colony - a colony given to a proprietor to govern (in 17th century)
colonial - a resident of a colony
2.colony - a group of organisms of the same type living or growing together
biological group - a group of plants or animals
caste - in some social insects (such as ants) a physically distinct individual or group of individuals specialized to perform certain functions in the colony
3.Colony - one of the 13 British colonies that formed the original states of the United States
U.S.A., United States, United States of America, US, USA, America, the States, U.S. - North American republic containing 50 states - 48 conterminous states in North America plus Alaska in northwest North America and the Hawaiian Islands in the Pacific Ocean; achieved independence in 1776
4.colony - a place where a group of people with the same interest or occupation are concentrated; "a nudist colony"; "an artists' colony"
place, property - any area set aside for a particular purpose; "who owns this place?"; "the president was concerned about the property across from the White House"
5.colony - a geographical area politically controlled by a distant country
Crown Colony - a British colony controlled by the British Crown, represented by a governor
6.colony - (microbiology) a group of organisms grown from a single parent cell
microbiology - the branch of biology that studies microorganisms and their effects on humans
animal group - a group of animals

colony

noun settlement, territory, province, possession, dependency, outpost, dominion, satellite state, community Cyprus, a former British colony, gained independence in 1960.

colony

noun
An area subject to rule by an outside power:
Translations
جَماعَهمَجْموعَة حَيوانات أو طُيورمُسْتَعْمَرَه
kolonie
koloni
siirtomaayhdyskuntayhteiskunta
kolóniagyarmat
nÿlendasambúsambú, sambÿli, kommúna
colonia
kolonialistaskolonialistiniskolonializmaskolonijakolonijinis
grupējumskolonija
kolónia
kolonija
koloni
thuộc địa

colony

[ˈkɒlənɪ] N (colonies (pl)) → colonia f

colony

[ˈkɒləni] n
(= country) → colonie f
[birds, insects, animals] → colonie f

colony

nKolonie f

colony

[ˈkɒlənɪ] ncolonia

colony

(ˈkoləni) plural ˈcolonies noun
1. (a group of people who form) a settlement in one country etc which is under the rule of another country. France used to have many colonies in Africa.
2. a group of people having the same interests, living close together. a colony of artists.
3. a collection of animals, birds etc, of one type, living together. a colony of gulls.
coˈlonial (-ˈlou-) adjective
Britain was formerly a colonial power.
coˈlonialism noun
coˈlonialist noun
and adjective.
ˈcolonize, ˈcolonise verb
to establish a colony in (a place). The English colonized New England in 1620.
ˈcolonist noun
ˌcoloniˈzation, ˌcoloniˈsation noun

col·o·ny

n. colonia, cultivo de bacterias derivadas del mismo organismo.
References in classic literature ?
So when the villagers find they are visited by a colony of these vampires they get out, taking their live stock with them, and stay in caves or in densely wooded places until the bats fly on.
But the scout, who had placed his chin in his hand, with an expression of cold indifference, gradually suffered his rigid features to relax, until, as verse succeeded verse, he felt his iron nature subdued, while his recollection was carried back to boyhood, when his ears had been accustomed to listen to similar sounds of praise, in the settlements of the colony.
The founders of a new colony, whatever Utopia of human virtue and happiness they might originally project, have invariably recognised it among their earliest practical necessities to allot a portion of the virgin soil as a cemetery, and another portion as the site of a prison.
I forbore, for the moment, to analyze this description further than by the reflection that a part of it applied to several of the members of the household, of the half-dozen maids and men who were still of our small colony.
The whale-ship is the true mother of that now mighty colony.
I think there is nothing more pathetic than to see one of these poor old childless couples taking a menagerie of yelping little worthless dogs to their hearts; and then adding some cursing and squawking parrots and a jackass-voiced macaw; and next a couple of hundred screeching songbirds, and presently some fetid guinea pigs and rabbits, and a howling colony of cats.
I was now on a level with the crow colony, and could see into their nests.
Heathcliff would as soon lift a finger at you as the king would march his army against a colony of mice.
I have never know'd her to be lone and lorn, for a single minute, not even when the colony was all afore us, and we was new to it.
I was relieved to find that the hotel people evidently considered me the right sort of person, and didn't take me for a Sunday-school treat,--for presently I found myself in a charming little corner bedroom, whence I could survey the whole extent of the little colony of pleasure.
Ships are sent with the first opportunity; the natives driven out or destroyed; their princes tortured to discover their gold; a free license given to all acts of inhumanity and lust, the earth reeking with the blood of its inhabitants: and this execrable crew of butchers, employed in so pious an expedition, is a modern colony, sent to convert and civilize an idolatrous and barbarous people!
On the contrary, that same assembly which issued the Declaration of Independence, instead of continuing to act in the name and by the authority of the good people of the United States, had, immediately after the appointment of the committee to prepare the Declaration, appointed another committee, of one member from each colony, to prepare and digest the form of confederation to be entered into between the colonies.