coloratura

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col·or·a·tu·ra

 (kŭl′ər-ə-to͝or′ə, -tyo͝or′ə)
n. Music
1. The ornamentation of music written for the voice with florid passages, especially trills and runs.
2. Vocal music characterized by florid ornamental passages.
3. A singer, especially a soprano, specializing in such ornamentation.

[Obsolete Italian, from Late Latin colōrātūra, coloring, from Latin colōrātus, past participle of colōrāre, to color, from color, color; see color.]

coloratura

(ˌkɒlərəˈtʊərə) or

colorature

n
1. (Classical Music)
a. (in 18th- and 19th-century arias) a florid virtuoso passage
b. (as modifier): a coloratura aria.
2. (Classical Music) Also called: coloratura soprano a lyric soprano who specializes in such music
[C19: from obsolete Italian, literally: colouring, from Latin colōrāre to colour]

col•o•ra•tu•ra

(ˌkʌl ər əˈtʊər ə, -ˈtyʊər ə, ˌkɒl-, ˌkoʊl-)

n., pl. -ras.
1. runs, trills, and other florid decorations in vocal music.
2. a lyric soprano of high range who specializes in such music.
[1730–40; < Italian < Late Latin: literally, coloring. See color, -ate1, -ure]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coloratura - a lyric soprano who specializes in coloratura vocal music
soprano - a female singer
2.coloratura - singing with florid ornamentation
singing, vocalizing - the act of singing vocal music
Translations

coloratura

[ˌkɒlərəˈtʊərə] N
1. (= passage) → coloratura f
2. (= singer) → soprano f de coloratura

coloratura

[ˌkɒlərəˈtʊərə]
n
(= music) → colorature f
(= singer) → colorature f
modif [soprano] → colorature; [technique, aria] → de colorature; [role] → de colorature

coloratura

nKoloratur f
References in periodicals archive ?
Espiritu's featured students are: coloratura sopranos Lara Maigue and Marielle Tuason, sopranos Stephanie Aguilar, Anna Migallos, Stefanie Quintin and Kay Balajadia Liggayu, mezzo soprano Krissan Manikan-Tan, tenors Nomher Nival, Christian Nagano and Erv Lumauag, and baritone Noel Azcona.
It is striking that with so many divisions of the soprano voices, including four distinct types of coloratura sopranos, Boldrey did not suggest the category of coloratura mezzo soprano.