colours


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to colours: Primary colours

colours

(ˈkʌləz) or

colors

pl n
1. (Heraldry)
a. the flag that indicates nationality
b. military the ceremony of hoisting or lowering the colours
2. (Military) a pair of silk flags borne by a military unit, esp British, comprising the Queen's Colour showing the unit's crest, and the Regimental Colour showing the crest and battle honours
3. true nature or character (esp in the phrase show one's colours)
4. a distinguishing badge or flag, as of an academic institution
5. (General Sporting Terms) sport Brit a badge or other symbol denoting membership of a team, esp at a school or college
6. informal a distinguishing embroidered patch denoting membership of a motorcycle gang
7. nail one's colours to the mast
a. to refuse to admit defeat
b. to declare openly one's opinions or allegiances
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.colours - a distinguishing emblem; "his tie proclaimed his school colors"
emblem - special design or visual object representing a quality, type, group, etc.
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
2.colours - a flag that shows its nationalitycolours - a flag that shows its nationality  
ensign - colors flown by a ship to show its nationality
flag - emblem usually consisting of a rectangular piece of cloth of distinctive design
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
Translations
إمْتِياز، فَوْزعَلَممَلابِس مُلَوَّنَه مُمَيِّزَه
barvypraporřazení do družstvavlajka
faneflagjockeydragtkomme med på holdet
nemzeti zászló
borîi, merkiflagg, fánikomast í liî
zaradenie do mužstva
bayrakflâmaformasancaktakıma girme

colour

(American) color (ˈkalə) noun
1. a quality which objects have, and which can be seen, only when light falls on them. What colour is her dress?; Red, blue and yellow are colours.
2. paint(s). That artist uses water-colours.
3. (a) skin-colour varying with race. people of all colours.
4. vividness; interest. There's plenty of colour in his stories.
adjective
(of photographs etc) in colour, not black and white. colour film; colour television.
verb
to put colour on; to paint. They coloured the walls yellow.
ˈcoloured adjective
1. having colour. She prefers white baths to coloured baths.
2. belonging to a dark-skinned race. There are only two white families living in this street – the rest are coloured.
noun
(sometimes used impolitely) a dark-skinned person especially of Negro origin.
ˈcolourful adjective
1. full of colour. a colourful pattern.
2. vivid and interesting. a colourful account of his experiences.
ˈcolouring noun
1. something used to give colour. She put pink colouring in the icing.
2. complexion. She had very high colouring (= a very pink complexion).
ˈcolourless adjective
1. without colour. Water is colourless.
2. not lively or interesting. a colourless young woman.
ˈcolours noun plural
1. the distinction of winning a place in the team in some sports. He won his cricket colours last season.
2. a flag. Army regiments salute the colours when on parade.
3. a tunic of certain colours worn by a jockey to show that his race-horse belongs to a certain person.
ˈcolour-blind adjective
unable to tell the difference between certain colours. As he was colour-blind he could not distinguish between red and green.
ˈcolour scheme noun
an arrangement or choice of colours in decorating a house etc.
ˌoff-ˈcolour adjective
not feeling well. He was a bit off-colour the morning after the party.
colour in
to put colour into (drawings etc). He coloured in all the oblong shapes on the page.
show oneself in one's true colours
to show or express one's real character, opinion etc. He pretends to be very generous but he showed himself in his true colours when he refused to give money to charity.
with flying colours
with great success. He passed his exam with flying colours.
References in classic literature ?
Duquesne, eleven other Frenchmen, and some of their own chiefs, and marched up within view of our fort, with British and French colours flying; and having sent a summons to me, in his Britannick Majesty's name, to surrender the fort, I requested two days consideration, which was granted.
The walls were hung round with tapestry, said to be from the Gobelin looms, and, at all events, representing the Scriptural story of David and Bathsheba, and Nathan the Prophet, in colours still unfaded, but which made the fair woman of the scene almost as grimly picturesque as the woe-denouncing seer.
Yes, I willI declare I willand you shall see how she takes it; whether she colours.
It was a landscape in water colours, of which I had made a present to the superintendent, in acknowledgment of her obliging mediation with the committee on my behalf, and which she had framed and glazed.
The disposition of everything in the rooms, from the largest object to the least; the arrangement of colours, the elegant variety and contrast obtained by thrift in trifles, by delicate hands, clear eyes, and good sense; were at once so pleasant in themselves, and so expressive of their originator, that, as Mr.
The business of this enchanter on earth, being principally to be talked at, sung at, butted at, danced at, and flashed at with fires of various colours, he had a good deal of time on his hands.
She continued to stand, however, looking at the placid churchyard with the long shadows of the gravestones across the bright green hillocks, and at the glowing autumn colours of the Rectory trees beyond.
What particular fault will suit a particular unknown girl is obviously as difficult to determine as in what colours she will look her best.
All in a moment through the gloom were seen Ten thousand Banners rise into the Air With Orient Colours waving: with them rose A Forrest huge of Spears: and thronging Helms Appear'd, and serried Shields in thick array Of depth immeasurable: Anon they move In perfect PHALANX to the Dorian mood Of Flutes and soft Recorders; such as rais'd To highth of noblest temper Hero's old Arming to Battel, and in stead of rage Deliberate valour breath'd, firm and unmov'd With dread of death to flight or foul retreat, Nor wanting power to mitigate and swage With solemn touches, troubl'd thoughts, and chase Anguish and doubt and fear and sorrow and pain From mortal or immortal minds.
His jacket had been stained of a bright purple hue, upon which there had been some attempt to paint grotesque ornaments in different colours.
Then, climbing on the roof, he had with his own hand bent and run up the colours.
He then commanded his general (who was an old experienced leader, and a great patron of mine) to draw up the troops in close order, and march them under me; the foot by twenty-four abreast, and the horse by sixteen, with drums beating, colours flying, and pikes advanced.