combustion


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com·bus·tion

 (kəm-bŭs′chən)
n.
1. The process of burning.
2. A chemical change, especially oxidation, accompanied by the production of heat and light.
3. Violent anger or agitation: Combustion within the populace slowly built up to the point of revolution.

[Middle English, from Late Latin combustiō, combustiōn-, from Latin combustus, past participle of combūrere, to burn up, blend of com-, intensive pref.; see com- and ambūrere, to burn around (amb-, ambi-, ambi- + ūrere, to burn).]

com·bus′tive (-tĭv) adj.

combustion

(kəmˈbʌstʃən)
n
1. the process of burning
2. (Chemistry) any process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to produce a significant rise in temperature and the emission of light
3. (Chemistry) a chemical process in which two compounds, such as sodium and chlorine, react together to produce heat and light
4. (Chemistry) a process in which a compound reacts slowly with oxygen to produce little heat and no light
[C15: from Old French, from Latin combūrere to burn up, from com- (intensive) + ūrere to burn]
comˈbustive n, adj

com•bus•tion

(kəmˈbʌs tʃən)

n.
1. the act or process of burning.
2.
a. rapid oxidation accompanied by heat and, usu., light.
b. chemical combination producing heat and light.
c. slow oxidation not accompanied by high temperature and light.
3. violent excitement; tumult.
[1400–50; late Middle English (< Middle French) < Late Latin]
com•bus′tive, adj.

com·bus·tion

(kəm-bŭs′chən)
1. The process of burning.
2. A chemical change, especially through the rapid combination of a substance with oxygen, producing heat and, usually, light. See also spontaneous combustion.

combustion

The chemical term for burning, usually in oxygen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.combustion - a process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and lightcombustion - a process in which a substance reacts with oxygen to give heat and light
deflagration - combustion that propagates through a gas or along the surface of an explosive at a rapid rate driven by the transfer of heat
flame, flaming, fire - the process of combustion of inflammable materials producing heat and light and (often) smoke; "fire was one of our ancestors' first discoveries"
internal combustion - the combustion of fuel inside a cylinder (as in an internal-combustion engine)
oxidation, oxidisation, oxidization - the process of oxidizing; the addition of oxygen to a compound with a loss of electrons; always occurs accompanied by reduction
2.combustion - a state of violent disturbance and excitement; "combustion grew until revolt was unavoidable"
garboil, tumult, tumultuousness, uproar - a state of commotion and noise and confusion
3.combustion - the act of burning somethingcombustion - the act of burning something; "the burning of leaves was prohibited by a town ordinance"
change of integrity - the act of changing the unity or wholeness of something
arson, fire-raising, incendiarism - malicious burning to destroy property; "the British term for arson is fire-raising"
kindling, firing, ignition, inflammation, lighting - the act of setting something on fire
incineration - the act of burning something completely; reducing it to ashes
Translations
احْتِراق ، اشْتِعال
spalovánívzníceníhoření
forbrænding
palaminen
égés
brennsla; bruni
spaľovanie
tutuşmayanma

combustion

[kəmˈbʌstʃən]
A. Ncombustión f
see also internal
B. CPD combustion chamber Ncámara f de combustión

combustion

[kəmˈbʌstʃən] n [substance] → combustion f spontaneous combustion, combustion chambercombustion chamber n [engine, furnace] → chambre f de combustion

combustion

nVerbrennung f

combustion

[kəmˈbʌstʃn] ncombustione f

combustible

(kəmˈbastəbl) adjective
liable to catch fire and burn. combustible materials.
combustion (kəmˈbastʃən) noun
burning. the combustion of gases.
References in classic literature ?
The possibility of what is called spontaneous combustion has been denied since the death of Mr.
A litre of gunpowder weighs about two pounds; during combustion it produces 400 litres of gas.
The combustion of the hydrogen and of the oxygen at the point of the cylinder produces solely the vapor or steam of water.
Suddenly a dreadful shock was felt, and the projectile, under the force of six billions of litres of gas, developed by the combustion of pyroxyle, mounted into space.
It rained all the time we were taking it back from the hulk, and now with this long passage it got heated, and there was another case of spontaneous combustion.
Just now heaps of dead weeds and refuse were burning on many of the plots, the dry weather favouring their combustion.
That our principal movements were known to the First Born I could not have doubted, in view of the attack of the fleet upon us the day before, nor could the stopping of the pumps of Omean at the psychological moment have been due to chance, nor the starting of a chemical combustion within the one corridor through which we were advancing upon the Temple of Issus been due to aught than well-calculated design.
She had promised to wait for him, and did so with a faithfulness that cost her dear, because Mac forgot his appointment when the lessons were done, and became absorbed in a chemical experiment, till a general combustion of gases drove him out of his laboratory.
After I have heard you myself, when the whole of my right side has been benumbed, going on with your master about combustion, and calcination, and calorification, and I may say every kind of ation that could drive a poor invalid distracted, to hear you talking in this absurd way about sparks and ashes
According to Liebig, man's body is a stove, and food the fuel which keeps up the internal combustion in the lungs.
Before him rose a grotesque mass of rocks, that resembled nothing so much as a vast fire petrified at the moment of its most fervent combustion.
Immense clouds of white smoke had been pouring over the summit of the mountain, and had concealed the approach and ravages of the element; but a crackling sound drew the eyes of Miss Temple, as she flew over the ground supported by the young man, toward the outline of smoke where she already perceived the waving flames shooting forward from the vapor, now flaring high in the air, and then bending to the earth, seeming to light into combustion every stick and shrub on which they breathed.