come in


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Idioms.
Related to come in: come in handy

come

 (kŭm)
intr.v. came (kām), come, com·ing, comes
1.
a. To advance toward the speaker or toward a specified place; approach: Come to me.
b. To advance in a specified manner: The children came reluctantly when I insisted.
2.
a. To make progress; advance: a former drug addict who has come a long way.
b. To fare: How are things coming today? They're coming fine.
3.
a. To reach a particular point in a series or as a result of orderly progression: At last we came to the chapter on ergonomics.
b. To arrive, as in due course: Dawn comes at 5 am in June.
4. To move into view; appear: The moon came over the horizon.
5. To occur in time; take place: The game will be played tomorrow, come rain or shine.
6.
a. To arrive at a particular result or end: come to an understanding.
b. To arrive at or reach a particular state or condition: Come to your senses!
c. To move or be brought to a particular position: The convoy came to an abrupt halt.
7. To extend; reach: water that came to my waist.
8. To have priority; rank: My work comes first.
9. To happen as a result: This mess comes of your carelessness.
10. To fall to one: No good can come of this.
11. To occur in the mind: A good idea just came to me.
12.
a. To issue forth: A cry came from the frightened child.
b. To be derived; originate: Oaks come from acorns.
c. To be descended: They come from a good family.
d. To be within a given range or spectrum of reference or application: This stipulation comes within the terms of your contract.
13. To be a native or resident: My friend comes from Chicago.
14. To add up to a certain amount: Expenses came to more than income.
15.
a. To become: The knot came loose. This is a dream that has come true.
b. To turn out to be: A good education doesn't come cheap.
16. To be available or obtainable: shoes that come in all sizes.
17. Vulgar Slang To experience orgasm.
n. also cum (kŭm) Vulgar Slang
Semen ejaculated during orgasm.
Phrasal Verbs:
come about
1. To take place; happen.
2. To turn around.
3. Nautical To change tack.
come across
1. To meet or find by chance: came across my old college roommate in town today.
2. Slang
a. To do what is wanted.
b. To pay over money that is demanded: came across with the check.
3. To give an impression: "He comes across as a very sincere, religious individual" (William L. Clay).
come along
1. To make advances to a goal; progress: Things are coming along fine.
2. To go with someone else who takes the lead: I'll come along on the hike.
3. To show up; appear: Don't take the first offer that comes along.
come around (or round)
1. To recover, revive: fainted but soon came around.
2. To change one's opinion or position: You'll come around after you hear the whole story.
come at
1. To obtain; get: come at an education through study.
2. To rush at; attack.
come back
1. To return to or regain past success after a period of misfortune.
2. To retort; reply: came back with a sharp riposte.
3. To recur to the memory: It's all coming back to me now.
come between
To cause to be in conflict or estrangement.
come by
1. To gain possession of; acquire: Mortgages are hard to come by.
2. To pay a visit.
come down
1. To lose wealth or position: He has really come down in the world.
2.
a. To pass or be handed down by tradition: customs that come down from colonial times.
b. To be handed down from a higher authority: An indictment finally came down.
3. Slang To happen; occur: What's coming down tonight?
4. Slang To experience diminishing effects of a recreational or hallucinogenic drug.
come in
1.
a. To arrive: Fall clothes will be coming in soon.
b. To become available for use: New weather information just came in.
c. To start producing. Used of an oil well.
2. To arrive among those who finish a contest or race: came in fifth.
3. To perform or function in a particular way: A food processor comes in handy.
4. To reply in a specified manner to a call or signal: The pilot's voice came in loud and clear.
5. To take on a specified role: When editorial review commences, that's where you come in.
come into
To acquire, especially as an inheritance: She came into a fortune on her 21st birthday.
come off
1. To happen; occur: The trip came off on schedule.
2. To acquit oneself: She is sure to come off badly if challenged to explain.
3. To turn out to be successful: a party that came off.
come on
1. To convey a particular personal image: comes on as an old-fashioned reactionary.
2. Slang To show sexual interest in someone: trying to come on to me during the party.
3.
a. To progress or advance in increments: Darkness came on after seven.
b. To begin in small increments or by degrees: Sleet came on after one o'clock.
4. To hurry up; move rapidly. Often used in the imperative: Would you please come on! We'll be late!
5. To stop an inappropriate behavior; abandon a position or an attitude; be obliging. Used chiefly in the imperative: You've used the same feeble excuse for weeks. Come on!
come out
1. To become known: The whole story came out at the trial.
2. To be issued or brought out: The author's new book just came out.
3. To make a formal social debut: She came out at age 18 in New York City.
4. To end up; result: Everything came out wrong.
5. To declare oneself publicly: The governor came out in favor of tax breaks.
6. To reveal that one is a gay man, a lesbian, or a bisexual.
come over
1. To change sides, as in a controversy.
2. To pay a casual visit.
come through
1. To do what is required or anticipated: I asked for their help, and they came through.
2.
a. To become manifest: The parents' tenderness comes through in their facial expressions.
b. To be communicated: The coach's displeasure came through loud and clear.
come to
1. To recover consciousness: The fainting victim came to.
2. Nautical
a. To bring the bow into the wind.
b. To anchor.
come up
1. To manifest itself; arise: The question never came up.
2. To rise above the horizon: The sun came up.
3. To rise, as in status or rank: a general who came up from the ranks.
4. To draw near; approach: came up and said hello.
come upon
To discover or meet by accident.
come with Informal
To accompany someone; go along: I'm going to the store; do you want to come with?
Idioms:
come a cropper
To fail utterly.
come again
Used as a request to repeat what was said.
come clean
To confess all.
come down on
To punish, oppose, or reprimand severely and often with force: a district attorney who came down hard on drug dealers.
come down to
1. To confront or deal with forthrightly: When you come right down to it, you have to admit I'm correct.
2. To amount to in essence: It comes down to this: the man is a cheat.
come down with
To become sick with (an illness): came down with the flu.
come in for
To receive; be subjected to: came in for harsh criticism.
come into (one's) own
1. To get possession of what belongs to one.
2. To obtain rightful recognition or prosperity: a concert pianist who has at last come into his own.
come off it Slang
To stop acting or speaking foolishly or pretentiously. Often used in the imperative.
come out with
1. To put into words; say: always comes out with the truth.
2. To reveal publicly: came out with a new tax package.
come to blows
To begin a physical fight.
come to grief
To meet with disaster; fail.
come to grips with
To confront squarely and attempt to deal decisively with: "He had to come to grips with the proposition" (Louis Auchincloss).
come to light/hand
To be clearly revealed or disclosed: "A further problem ... came to light last summer as a result of post-flight inspections" (John Noble Wilford).
come to terms with
1. To come to accept; become reconciled to: finally came to terms with his lack of talent.
2. To reach mutual agreement: The warring factions have at last come to terms.
come true
To happen as predicted: My fondest dreams have at last come true.
come up against
To encounter, especially a difficulty or major problem.
come up with
To bring forth, discover, or produce: came up with a cure for the disease.

[Middle English comen, from Old English cuman; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

come in

vb (intr, mainly adverb)
1. to enter, used in the imperative when admitting a person
2. to prove to be: it came in useful.
3. to become fashionable or seasonable
4. (Cricket) cricket to begin an innings
5. (General Sporting Terms) sport to finish a race (in a certain position)
6. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (of a politician or political party) to win an election
7. (Broadcasting) radio television to be received: news is coming in of a big fire in Glasgow.
8. (of money) to be received as income
9. to play a role; advance one's interests: where do I come in?.
10. (foll by for) to be the object of: the Chancellor came in for a lot of criticism in the Commons.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.come in - to come or go into; "the boat entered an area of shallow marshes"
take the field - go on the playing field, of a football team
penetrate, perforate - pass into or through, often by overcoming resistance; "The bullet penetrated her chest"
re-enter - enter again; "You cannot re-enter the country with this visa"
file in - enter by marching in a file
pop in - enter briefly; "He popped in for two minutes"
walk in - enter by walking; "She walks in at all hours, as if she lived here"
call at, out in - enter a harbor; "the ship called in Athens"
take water - enter the water; "the wild ducks took water"
turn in - make an entrance by turning from a road; "Turn in after you see the gate"
board, get on - get on board of (trains, buses, ships, aircraft, etc.)
intrude, irrupt - enter uninvited; "They intruded on our dinner party"; "She irrupted into our sitting room"
encroach upon, intrude on, obtrude upon, invade - to intrude upon, infringe, encroach on, violate; "This new colleague invades my territory"; "The neighbors intrude on your privacy"
dock - come into dock; "the ship docked"
2.come in - be received; "News came in of the massacre in Rwanda"
arrive, come, get - reach a destination; arrive by movement or progress; "She arrived home at 7 o'clock"; "She didn't get to Chicago until after midnight"
3.come in - come into fashion; become fashionable
fashion - the latest and most admired style in clothes and cosmetics and behavior
change - undergo a change; become different in essence; losing one's or its original nature; "She changed completely as she grew older"; "The weather changed last night"
go out - go out of fashion; become unfashionable
4.come in - to insert between other elements; "She interjected clever remarks"
cut off, disrupt, interrupt, break up - make a break in; "We interrupt the program for the following messages"
5.come in - take a place in a competition; often followed by an ordinal; "Jerry came in third in the Marathon"
rank - take or have a position relative to others; "This painting ranks among the best in the Western World"

come

verb
1. To go forward, especially toward a conclusion.Also used with along:
2. To take place at a set time:
4. To happen to one:
5. To have as a source:
6. To have as one's home or place of origin:
7. To come to be:
become, get, grow, turn (out), wax.
phrasal verb
come aboutphrasal verb
come across
1. To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
2. Slang. To give in common with others:
Informal: kick in.
phrasal verb
come around or round
To regain one's health:
phrasal verb
come back
To go again to a former place:
phrasal verb
come by
1. To come into possession of:
Informal: land, pick up.
2. To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
come in
1. To come or go into (a place):
Nautical: put in.
Idioms: gain entrance, set foot in.
2. To complete a race or competition in a specified position:
phrasal verb
come into
To receive (property) from one who has died:
phrasal verb
come off
2. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
phrasal verb
come on or upon
To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
phrasal verb
come out
1. To be made public:
Informal: leak (out).
2. To make one's formal entry, as into society:
Idiom: make one's bow.
phrasal verb
come over
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
come through
To exist in spite of adversity:
phrasal verb
come to
To reach (a goal or objective):
Informal: hit on (or upon).
Translations
dorazit
komme ind
saapua
stizati
入る
받다
komma in
เข้ามา
đến

w>come in

vi
(= enter)(he)reinkommen; (person also)eintreten; come in!herein!; to come in out of the coldaus der Kälte kommen
(= arrive)ankommen, eintreffen; (train also)einfahren; (ship also)einlaufen
(tide)kommen
(report, information etc)hereinkommen; a report has just come in of …uns ist gerade eine Meldung über … zugegangen
(= become seasonable) when do strawberries come in?wann ist die Zeit für Erdbeeren?, wann gibt es (frische) Erdbeeren?
(fashions, vogue)aufkommen, in Mode kommen
(in a race) he came in fourther wurde Vierter, er belegte den vierten Platz; where did he come in?der Wievielte ist er denn geworden?, welchen Platz hat er belegt?
(Pol: = be elected to power) when the socialists came inals die Sozialisten ans Ruder or an die Regierung kamen
(= be received as income) he has £15,000 coming in every yearer kriegt (inf)or hat £ 15.000 im Jahr; we have no money coming in at the momentim Moment kommt kein Geld herein
(= have a part to play) where do I come in?welche Rolle spiele ich dabei?; … but where does your brother come in?… aber was hat dein Bruder mit der ganzen Sache zu tun?; that will come in handy (inf) or usefuldas kann ich/man noch gut gebrauchen
(Telec) come in, Panda 5Panda 5, melden!

come in

يَدْخُلُ dorazit komme ind hereinkommen παραλαμβάνω entrar, recibir saapua entrer stizati entrare 入る 받다 binnenkomen komme inn wejść entrar, receber поступать komma in เข้ามา girmek đến 进来
References in periodicals archive ?
The 9/11 attacks showed what just a few determined terrorists can do when we allow them easy access to our country, and here we are letting millions of people come in unchecked.
The favorites are given the shifts when most aliens come in, so they detain more people, it looks better on their record, and they get promoted faster," he says with a trace of bitterness.
These announcements come in response to growing demand for INS' unique network consulting services across the U.