come out


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Related to come out: come out of the closet

come

 (kŭm)
intr.v. came (kām), come, com·ing, comes
1.
a. To advance toward the speaker or toward a specified place; approach: Come to me.
b. To advance in a specified manner: The children came reluctantly when I insisted.
2.
a. To make progress; advance: a former drug addict who has come a long way.
b. To fare: How are things coming today? They're coming fine.
3.
a. To reach a particular point in a series or as a result of orderly progression: At last we came to the chapter on ergonomics.
b. To arrive, as in due course: Dawn comes at 5 am in June.
4. To move into view; appear: The moon came over the horizon.
5. To occur in time; take place: The game will be played tomorrow, come rain or shine.
6.
a. To arrive at a particular result or end: come to an understanding.
b. To arrive at or reach a particular state or condition: Come to your senses!
c. To move or be brought to a particular position: The convoy came to an abrupt halt.
7. To extend; reach: water that came to my waist.
8. To have priority; rank: My work comes first.
9. To happen as a result: This mess comes of your carelessness.
10. To fall to one: No good can come of this.
11. To occur in the mind: A good idea just came to me.
12.
a. To issue forth: A cry came from the frightened child.
b. To be derived; originate: Oaks come from acorns.
c. To be descended: They come from a good family.
d. To be within a given range or spectrum of reference or application: This stipulation comes within the terms of your contract.
13. To be a native or resident: My friend comes from Chicago.
14. To add up to a certain amount: Expenses came to more than income.
15.
a. To become: The knot came loose. This is a dream that has come true.
b. To turn out to be: A good education doesn't come cheap.
16. To be available or obtainable: shoes that come in all sizes.
17. Vulgar Slang To experience orgasm.
n. also cum (kŭm) Vulgar Slang
Semen ejaculated during orgasm.
Phrasal Verbs:
come about
1. To take place; happen.
2. To turn around.
3. Nautical To change tack.
come across
1. To meet or find by chance: came across my old college roommate in town today.
2. Slang
a. To do what is wanted.
b. To pay over money that is demanded: came across with the check.
3. To give an impression: "He comes across as a very sincere, religious individual" (William L. Clay).
come along
1. To make advances to a goal; progress: Things are coming along fine.
2. To go with someone else who takes the lead: I'll come along on the hike.
3. To show up; appear: Don't take the first offer that comes along.
come around (or round)
1. To recover, revive: fainted but soon came around.
2. To change one's opinion or position: You'll come around after you hear the whole story.
come at
1. To obtain; get: come at an education through study.
2. To rush at; attack.
come back
1. To return to or regain past success after a period of misfortune.
2. To retort; reply: came back with a sharp riposte.
3. To recur to the memory: It's all coming back to me now.
come between
To cause to be in conflict or estrangement.
come by
1. To gain possession of; acquire: Mortgages are hard to come by.
2. To pay a visit.
come down
1. To lose wealth or position: He has really come down in the world.
2.
a. To pass or be handed down by tradition: customs that come down from colonial times.
b. To be handed down from a higher authority: An indictment finally came down.
3. Slang To happen; occur: What's coming down tonight?
4. Slang To experience diminishing effects of a recreational or hallucinogenic drug.
come in
1.
a. To arrive: Fall clothes will be coming in soon.
b. To become available for use: New weather information just came in.
c. To start producing. Used of an oil well.
2. To arrive among those who finish a contest or race: came in fifth.
3. To perform or function in a particular way: A food processor comes in handy.
4. To reply in a specified manner to a call or signal: The pilot's voice came in loud and clear.
5. To take on a specified role: When editorial review commences, that's where you come in.
come into
To acquire, especially as an inheritance: She came into a fortune on her 21st birthday.
come off
1. To happen; occur: The trip came off on schedule.
2. To acquit oneself: She is sure to come off badly if challenged to explain.
3. To turn out to be successful: a party that came off.
come on
1. To convey a particular personal image: comes on as an old-fashioned reactionary.
2. Slang To show sexual interest in someone: trying to come on to me during the party.
3.
a. To progress or advance in increments: Darkness came on after seven.
b. To begin in small increments or by degrees: Sleet came on after one o'clock.
4. To hurry up; move rapidly. Often used in the imperative: Would you please come on! We'll be late!
5. To stop an inappropriate behavior; abandon a position or an attitude; be obliging. Used chiefly in the imperative: You've used the same feeble excuse for weeks. Come on!
come out
1. To become known: The whole story came out at the trial.
2. To be issued or brought out: The author's new book just came out.
3. To make a formal social debut: She came out at age 18 in New York City.
4. To end up; result: Everything came out wrong.
5. To declare oneself publicly: The governor came out in favor of tax breaks.
6. To reveal that one is a gay man, a lesbian, or a bisexual.
come over
1. To change sides, as in a controversy.
2. To pay a casual visit.
come through
1. To do what is required or anticipated: I asked for their help, and they came through.
2.
a. To become manifest: The parents' tenderness comes through in their facial expressions.
b. To be communicated: The coach's displeasure came through loud and clear.
come to
1. To recover consciousness: The fainting victim came to.
2. Nautical
a. To bring the bow into the wind.
b. To anchor.
come up
1. To manifest itself; arise: The question never came up.
2. To rise above the horizon: The sun came up.
3. To rise, as in status or rank: a general who came up from the ranks.
4. To draw near; approach: came up and said hello.
come upon
To discover or meet by accident.
come with Informal
To accompany someone; go along: I'm going to the store; do you want to come with?
Idioms:
come a cropper
To fail utterly.
come again
Used as a request to repeat what was said.
come clean
To confess all.
come down on
To punish, oppose, or reprimand severely and often with force: a district attorney who came down hard on drug dealers.
come down to
1. To confront or deal with forthrightly: When you come right down to it, you have to admit I'm correct.
2. To amount to in essence: It comes down to this: the man is a cheat.
come down with
To become sick with (an illness): came down with the flu.
come in for
To receive; be subjected to: came in for harsh criticism.
come into (one's) own
1. To get possession of what belongs to one.
2. To obtain rightful recognition or prosperity: a concert pianist who has at last come into his own.
come off it Slang
To stop acting or speaking foolishly or pretentiously. Often used in the imperative.
come out with
1. To put into words; say: always comes out with the truth.
2. To reveal publicly: came out with a new tax package.
come to blows
To begin a physical fight.
come to grief
To meet with disaster; fail.
come to grips with
To confront squarely and attempt to deal decisively with: "He had to come to grips with the proposition" (Louis Auchincloss).
come to light/hand
To be clearly revealed or disclosed: "A further problem ... came to light last summer as a result of post-flight inspections" (John Noble Wilford).
come to terms with
1. To come to accept; become reconciled to: finally came to terms with his lack of talent.
2. To reach mutual agreement: The warring factions have at last come to terms.
come true
To happen as predicted: My fondest dreams have at last come true.
come up against
To encounter, especially a difficulty or major problem.
come up with
To bring forth, discover, or produce: came up with a cure for the disease.

[Middle English comen, from Old English cuman; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

come out

vb (intr, adverb)
1. to be made public or revealed: the news of her death came out last week.
2. to make a debut in society or on stage
3.
a. Also: come out of the closet to declare openly that one is a homosexual
b. to reveal or declare any habit or practice formerly concealed
4. chiefly Brit to go on strike
5. to declare oneself: the government came out in favour of scrapping the project.
6. to be shown visibly or clearly: you came out very well in the photos.
7. to yield a satisfactory solution: these sums just won't come out.
8. (Journalism & Publishing) to be published: the paper comes out on Fridays.
9. (foll by in) to become covered with: you're coming out in spots.
10. (foll by with) to speak or declare openly: you can rely on him to come out with the facts.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.come out - appear or become visiblecome out - appear or become visible; make a showing; "She turned up at the funeral"; "I hope the list key is going to surface again"
appear - come into sight or view; "He suddenly appeared at the wedding"; "A new star appeared on the horizon"
2.come out - be issued or published; "Did your latest book appear yet?"; "The new Woody Allen film hasn't come out yet"
materialise, materialize, happen - come into being; become reality; "Her dream really materialized"
3.come out - come out of; "Water issued from the hole in the wall"; "The words seemed to come out by themselves"
pop out - come out suddenly or forcefully; "you stick a bill in the vending machine and the change pops out"
radiate - issue or emerge in rays or waves; "Heat radiated from the metal box"
leak - enter or escape as through a hole or crack or fissure; "Water leaked out of the can into the backpack"; "Gas leaked into the basement"
escape - issue or leak, as from a small opening; "Gas escaped into the bedroom"
fall - come out; issue; "silly phrases fell from her mouth"
debouch - pass out or emerge; especially of rivers; "The tributary debouched into the big river"
fall out, come out - come off; "His hair and teeth fell out"
4.come out - result or end; "How will the game turn out?"
end, cease, terminate, finish, stop - have an end, in a temporal, spatial, or quantitative sense; either spatial or metaphorical; "the bronchioles terminate in a capillary bed"; "Your rights stop where you infringe upon the rights of other"; "My property ends by the bushes"; "The symphony ends in a pianissimo"
eventuate - come out in the end
work out - happen in a certain way, leading to, producing, or resulting in a certain outcome, often well; "Things worked out in an interesting way"; "Not everything worked out in the end and we were disappointed"
5.come out - come off; "His hair and teeth fell out"
egress, come forth, emerge, go forth, come out, issue - come out of; "Water issued from the hole in the wall"; "The words seemed to come out by themselves"
6.come out - take a place in a competition; often followed by an ordinal; "Jerry came in third in the Marathon"
rank - take or have a position relative to others; "This painting ranks among the best in the Western World"
7.come out - make oneself visible; take action; "Young people should step to the fore and help their peers"
act, move - perform an action, or work out or perform (an action); "think before you act"; "We must move quickly"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"; "The nanny acted quickly by grabbing the toddler and covering him with a wet towel"
8.come out - bulge outward; "His eyes popped"
change form, change shape, deform - assume a different shape or form
9.come out - to state openly and publicly one's homosexuality; "This actor outed last year"
disclose, let on, divulge, expose, give away, let out, reveal, unwrap, discover, bring out, break - make known to the public information that was previously known only to a few people or that was meant to be kept a secret; "The auction house would not disclose the price at which the van Gogh had sold"; "The actress won't reveal how old she is"; "bring out the truth"; "he broke the news to her"; "unwrap the evidence in the murder case"
10.come out - be made known; be disclosed or revealed; "The truth will out"
11.come out - break out; "The tooth erupted and had to be extracted"
dehisce - burst or split open; "flowers dehisce when they release pollen"
appear - come into sight or view; "He suddenly appeared at the wedding"; "A new star appeared on the horizon"
erupt - appear on the skin; "A rash erupted on her arms after she had touched the exotic plant"

come

verb
1. To go forward, especially toward a conclusion.Also used with along:
2. To take place at a set time:
4. To happen to one:
5. To have as a source:
6. To have as one's home or place of origin:
7. To come to be:
become, get, grow, turn (out), wax.
phrasal verb
come aboutphrasal verb
come across
1. To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
2. Slang. To give in common with others:
Informal: kick in.
phrasal verb
come around or round
To regain one's health:
phrasal verb
come back
To go again to a former place:
phrasal verb
come by
1. To come into possession of:
Informal: land, pick up.
2. To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
come in
1. To come or go into (a place):
Nautical: put in.
Idioms: gain entrance, set foot in.
2. To complete a race or competition in a specified position:
phrasal verb
come into
To receive (property) from one who has died:
phrasal verb
come off
2. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
phrasal verb
come on or upon
To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
phrasal verb
come out
1. To be made public:
Informal: leak (out).
2. To make one's formal entry, as into society:
Idiom: make one's bow.
phrasal verb
come over
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
come through
To exist in spite of adversity:
phrasal verb
come to
To reach (a goal or objective):
Informal: hit on (or upon).
Translations
تَظْهَر الصّورَهيَزوليُضْرِب، يَخْرُج في إضْرابيَطْلُعُيَظْهَر
vyjítvyjít najevozmizetvstoupitvycházet
blive fremkaldtgå vækkomme fremkomme udlykkes
ilmestyäilmetäpäättyä
izaći
kijönsikerül
fara í verkfallfara úrkoma í ljóskoma útkoma út, framkallast
公になる
나오다
komma ut
เปิดตัว, เปิดเผยต่อสาธารณะ
xuất hiện

w>come out

vi
(= leave)(he)rauskommen; to come out of a room/meeting etcaus einem Zimmer/einer Versammlung etc kommen; can you come out tonight?kannst du heute Abend weg?; do you want to come out with me?gehst du mit mir weg?; he asked her to come out for a meal/driveer lud sie zum Essen/einer Spazierfahrt ein; to come out fighting (fig)sich kämpferisch geben
(= be published, marketed, book, magazine) → erscheinen, herauskommen; (new product)auf den Markt kommen; (film)(in den Kinos) anlaufen; (= become known, exam results) → herauskommen, bekannt werden; (news)bekannt werden
(Ind) to come out (on strike)in den Streik treten, streiken
(Phot, film, photograph) the photo of the hills hasn’t come out very welldas Foto von den Bergen ist nicht sehr gut geworden; let’s hope the photos come outhoffentlich sind die Bilder was geworden (inf)or gut geworden; you always come out well in photosdu bist sehr fotogen; all the details have come out clearlyalle Einzelheiten kommen klar (he)raus
(= show itself)sich zeigen; his arrogance comes out in everything he saysbei allem, was er sagt, kommt seine Arroganz durch
(splinter, stains, dye etc)(he)rausgehen
(Math: problems, divisions etc) → aufgehen
(= total, average)betragen; the total comes out at £500das Ganze beläuft sich auf (+acc)or macht (inf)£ 500
(in exams etc) he came out third in Frencher wurde Drittbester in Französisch
(stars, sun, flowers)(he)rauskommen
(truth, meaning etc)(he)rauskommen; no sooner had the words come out than …kaum waren die Worte heraus, als …
(= go into society: girl) → debütieren
(= be released: prisoner) → (he)rauskommen
(homosexual)sich outen; (man also)sich als Homosexueller bekennen; (woman also)sich als Lesbe bekennen
his face came out in spotser bekam lauter Pickel im Gesicht; he came out in a rasher bekam einen Ausschlag; he came out in a sweatihm brach der Schweiß aus
to come out against/in favour of or for somethingsich gegen/für etw aussprechen, etw ablehnen/befürworten
to come out of something badly/wellbei etw schlecht/nicht schlecht wegkommen; she came out of the interview wellsie hat bei dem Vorstellungsgespräch einen guten Eindruck gemacht; to come out on topsich durchsetzen, Sieger bleiben

come

(kam) past tense came (keim) past participle come verb
1. to move etc towards the person speaking or writing, or towards the place being referred to by him. Come here!; Are you coming to the dance?; John has come to see me; Have any letters come for me?
2. to become near or close to something in time or space. Christmas is coming soon.
3. to happen or be situated. The letter `d' comes between `c' and è' in the alphabet.
4. (often with to) to happen (by accident). How did you come to break your leg?
5. to arrive at (a certain state etc). What are things coming to? We have come to an agreement.
6. (with to) (of numbers, prices etc) to amount (to). The total comes to 51.
interjection
expressing disapproval, drawing attention etc. Come, come! That was very rude of you!
ˈcomer noun
late-comers will not be admitted; We welcome all comers.
ˈcoming noun
the comings and goings of the people in the street.
ˈcomeback noun
a return (especially to show business). The actress made a comeback years after retiring.
ˈcomedown noun
a fall in dignity etc. The smaller car was a bit of a comedown after the Rolls Royce.
come about
to happen. How did that come about?
come across
to meet or find by chance. He came across some old friends.
come along
1. to come with or accompany the person speaking etc. Come along with me!
2. to progress. How are things coming along?
come by
to get. How did you come by that black eye?
come down
to decrease; to become less. Tea has come down in price.
come into one's own
to have the opportunity of showing what one can do etc. He has at last come into his own as a pop-singer.
come off
1. to fall off. Her shoe came off.
2. to turn out (well); to succeed. The gamble didn't come off.
come on
1. to appear on stage or the screen. They waited for the comedian to come on.
2. hurry up!. Come on – we'll be late for the party!
3. don't be ridiculous!. Come on, you don't really expect me to believe that!
come out
1. to become known. The truth finally came out.
2. to be published. This newspaper comes out once a week.
3. to strike. The men have come out (on strike).
4. (of a photograph) to be developed. This photograph has come out very well.
5. to be removed. This dirty mark won't come out.
come round
1. (also come around) to visit. Come round and see us soon.
2. to regain consciousness. After receiving anesthesia, don't expect to come round for at least twenty minutes.
come to
to regain consciousness. When will he come to after the operation?
come to light
to be discovered. The theft only came to light when the owners returned from holiday.
come upon
to meet, find or discover by chance. She came upon a solution to the problem.
come up with
to think of; to produce. He's come up with a great idea.
come what may
whatever happens. I'll give you my support, come what may!
to come
(in the) future. in the days to come.

come out

يَطْلُعُ vyjít komme ud herauskommen κάνω ντεμπούτο salir ilmestyä sortir izaći uscire 公になる 나오다 uitkomen komme ut wyjść sair выходить komma ut เปิดตัว, เปิดเผยต่อสาธารณะ çıkmak xuất hiện 出来
References in classic literature ?
In that case I shall come out to-morrow and talk it over with you.
It was slow work, but every stroke carried us farther away from the shoal and nearer the shore, till at last the shooting died down, and when the moon did come out we were too far away to be in danger.
And so right here was a chance for Jurgis to make himself a place in the world, explained "Bush" Harper; he had been a union man, and he was known in the yards as a workingman; he must have hundreds of acquaintances, and as he had never talked politics with them he might come out as a Republican now without exciting the least suspicion.