come to


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Related to come to: come together, come to terms

come

 (kŭm)
intr.v. came (kām), come, com·ing, comes
1.
a. To advance toward the speaker or toward a specified place; approach: Come to me.
b. To advance in a specified manner: The children came reluctantly when I insisted.
2.
a. To make progress; advance: a former drug addict who has come a long way.
b. To fare: How are things coming today? They're coming fine.
3.
a. To reach a particular point in a series or as a result of orderly progression: At last we came to the chapter on ergonomics.
b. To arrive, as in due course: Dawn comes at 5 am in June.
4. To move into view; appear: The moon came over the horizon.
5. To occur in time; take place: The game will be played tomorrow, come rain or shine.
6.
a. To arrive at a particular result or end: come to an understanding.
b. To arrive at or reach a particular state or condition: Come to your senses!
c. To move or be brought to a particular position: The convoy came to an abrupt halt.
7. To extend; reach: water that came to my waist.
8. To have priority; rank: My work comes first.
9. To happen as a result: This mess comes of your carelessness.
10. To fall to one: No good can come of this.
11. To occur in the mind: A good idea just came to me.
12.
a. To issue forth: A cry came from the frightened child.
b. To be derived; originate: Oaks come from acorns.
c. To be descended: They come from a good family.
d. To be within a given range or spectrum of reference or application: This stipulation comes within the terms of your contract.
13. To be a native or resident: My friend comes from Chicago.
14. To add up to a certain amount: Expenses came to more than income.
15.
a. To become: The knot came loose. This is a dream that has come true.
b. To turn out to be: A good education doesn't come cheap.
16. To be available or obtainable: shoes that come in all sizes.
17. Vulgar Slang To experience orgasm.
n. also cum (kŭm) Vulgar Slang
Semen ejaculated during orgasm.
Phrasal Verbs:
come about
1. To take place; happen.
2. To turn around.
3. Nautical To change tack.
come across
1. To meet or find by chance: came across my old college roommate in town today.
2. Slang
a. To do what is wanted.
b. To pay over money that is demanded: came across with the check.
3. To give an impression: "He comes across as a very sincere, religious individual" (William L. Clay).
come along
1. To make advances to a goal; progress: Things are coming along fine.
2. To go with someone else who takes the lead: I'll come along on the hike.
3. To show up; appear: Don't take the first offer that comes along.
come around (or round)
1. To recover, revive: fainted but soon came around.
2. To change one's opinion or position: You'll come around after you hear the whole story.
come at
1. To obtain; get: come at an education through study.
2. To rush at; attack.
come back
1. To return to or regain past success after a period of misfortune.
2. To retort; reply: came back with a sharp riposte.
3. To recur to the memory: It's all coming back to me now.
come between
To cause to be in conflict or estrangement.
come by
1. To gain possession of; acquire: Mortgages are hard to come by.
2. To pay a visit.
come down
1. To lose wealth or position: He has really come down in the world.
2.
a. To pass or be handed down by tradition: customs that come down from colonial times.
b. To be handed down from a higher authority: An indictment finally came down.
3. Slang To happen; occur: What's coming down tonight?
4. Slang To experience diminishing effects of a recreational or hallucinogenic drug.
come in
1.
a. To arrive: Fall clothes will be coming in soon.
b. To become available for use: New weather information just came in.
c. To start producing. Used of an oil well.
2. To arrive among those who finish a contest or race: came in fifth.
3. To perform or function in a particular way: A food processor comes in handy.
4. To reply in a specified manner to a call or signal: The pilot's voice came in loud and clear.
5. To take on a specified role: When editorial review commences, that's where you come in.
come into
To acquire, especially as an inheritance: She came into a fortune on her 21st birthday.
come off
1. To happen; occur: The trip came off on schedule.
2. To acquit oneself: She is sure to come off badly if challenged to explain.
3. To turn out to be successful: a party that came off.
come on
1. To convey a particular personal image: comes on as an old-fashioned reactionary.
2. Slang To show sexual interest in someone: trying to come on to me during the party.
3.
a. To progress or advance in increments: Darkness came on after seven.
b. To begin in small increments or by degrees: Sleet came on after one o'clock.
4. To hurry up; move rapidly. Often used in the imperative: Would you please come on! We'll be late!
5. To stop an inappropriate behavior; abandon a position or an attitude; be obliging. Used chiefly in the imperative: You've used the same feeble excuse for weeks. Come on!
come out
1. To become known: The whole story came out at the trial.
2. To be issued or brought out: The author's new book just came out.
3. To make a formal social debut: She came out at age 18 in New York City.
4. To end up; result: Everything came out wrong.
5. To declare oneself publicly: The governor came out in favor of tax breaks.
6. To reveal that one is a gay man, a lesbian, or a bisexual.
come over
1. To change sides, as in a controversy.
2. To pay a casual visit.
come through
1. To do what is required or anticipated: I asked for their help, and they came through.
2.
a. To become manifest: The parents' tenderness comes through in their facial expressions.
b. To be communicated: The coach's displeasure came through loud and clear.
come to
1. To recover consciousness: The fainting victim came to.
2. Nautical
a. To bring the bow into the wind.
b. To anchor.
come up
1. To manifest itself; arise: The question never came up.
2. To rise above the horizon: The sun came up.
3. To rise, as in status or rank: a general who came up from the ranks.
4. To draw near; approach: came up and said hello.
come upon
To discover or meet by accident.
come with Informal
To accompany someone; go along: I'm going to the store; do you want to come with?
Idioms:
come a cropper
To fail utterly.
come again
Used as a request to repeat what was said.
come clean
To confess all.
come down on
To punish, oppose, or reprimand severely and often with force: a district attorney who came down hard on drug dealers.
come down to
1. To confront or deal with forthrightly: When you come right down to it, you have to admit I'm correct.
2. To amount to in essence: It comes down to this: the man is a cheat.
come down with
To become sick with (an illness): came down with the flu.
come in for
To receive; be subjected to: came in for harsh criticism.
come into (one's) own
1. To get possession of what belongs to one.
2. To obtain rightful recognition or prosperity: a concert pianist who has at last come into his own.
come off it Slang
To stop acting or speaking foolishly or pretentiously. Often used in the imperative.
come out with
1. To put into words; say: always comes out with the truth.
2. To reveal publicly: came out with a new tax package.
come to blows
To begin a physical fight.
come to grief
To meet with disaster; fail.
come to grips with
To confront squarely and attempt to deal decisively with: "He had to come to grips with the proposition" (Louis Auchincloss).
come to light/hand
To be clearly revealed or disclosed: "A further problem ... came to light last summer as a result of post-flight inspections" (John Noble Wilford).
come to terms with
1. To come to accept; become reconciled to: finally came to terms with his lack of talent.
2. To reach mutual agreement: The warring factions have at last come to terms.
come true
To happen as predicted: My fondest dreams have at last come true.
come up against
To encounter, especially a difficulty or major problem.
come up with
To bring forth, discover, or produce: came up with a cure for the disease.

[Middle English comen, from Old English cuman; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

come to

vb (intr)
1. (or: prep. and reflexive) to regain consciousness or return to one's normal state
2. (Nautical Terms) (adverb) nautical to slow a vessel or bring her to a stop
3. (preposition) to amount to (a sum of money): your bill comes to four pounds.
4. (preposition) to arrive at (a certain state): what is the world coming to?.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.come to - cause to experience suddenlycome to - cause to experience suddenly; "Panic struck me"; "An interesting idea hit her"; "A thought came to me"; "The thought struck terror in our minds"; "They were struck with fear"
impress, strike, affect, move - have an emotional or cognitive impact upon; "This child impressed me as unusually mature"; "This behavior struck me as odd"
2.come to - be relevant to; "There were lots of questions referring to her talk"; "My remark pertained to your earlier comments"
allude, advert, touch - make a more or less disguised reference to; "He alluded to the problem but did not mention it"
center, center on, concentrate on, focus on, revolve about, revolve around - center upon; "Her entire attention centered on her children"; "Our day revolved around our work"
go for, apply, hold - be pertinent or relevant or applicable; "The same laws apply to you!"; "This theory holds for all irrational numbers"; "The same rules go for everyone"
involve, regard, affect - connect closely and often incriminatingly; "This new ruling affects your business"
matter to, interest - be of importance or consequence; "This matters to me!"
3.come to - attaincome to - attain; "The horse finally struck a pace"
achieve, attain, accomplish, reach - to gain with effort; "she achieved her goal despite setbacks"
4.come to - return to consciousness; "The patient came to quickly"; "She revived after the doctor gave her an injection"
reanimate, recreate, revivify, vivify, revive, renovate, animate, quicken, repair - give new life or energy to; "A hot soup will revive me"; "This will renovate my spirits"; "This treatment repaired my health"
resuscitate, revive - cause to regain consciousness; "The doctors revived the comatose man"
change state, turn - undergo a transformation or a change of position or action; "We turned from Socialism to Capitalism"; "The people turned against the President when he stole the election"

come

verb
1. To go forward, especially toward a conclusion.Also used with along:
2. To take place at a set time:
4. To happen to one:
5. To have as a source:
6. To have as one's home or place of origin:
7. To come to be:
become, get, grow, turn (out), wax.
phrasal verb
come aboutphrasal verb
come across
1. To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come on (or upon), find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
2. Slang. To give in common with others:
Informal: kick in.
phrasal verb
come around or round
To regain one's health:
phrasal verb
come back
To go again to a former place:
phrasal verb
come by
1. To come into possession of:
Informal: land, pick up.
2. To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
come in
1. To come or go into (a place):
Nautical: put in.
Idioms: gain entrance, set foot in.
2. To complete a race or competition in a specified position:
phrasal verb
come into
To receive (property) from one who has died:
phrasal verb
come off
2. To turn out well:
Slang: click.
phrasal verb
come on or upon
To find or meet by chance:
bump into, chance on (or upon), come across, find, happen on (or upon), light on (or upon), run across, run into, stumble on (or upon), tumble on.
Archaic: alight on (or upon).
Idiom: meet up with.
phrasal verb
come out
1. To be made public:
Informal: leak (out).
2. To make one's formal entry, as into society:
Idiom: make one's bow.
phrasal verb
come over
To go to or seek out the company of in order to socialize:
Idiom: pay a visit.
phrasal verb
come through
To exist in spite of adversity:
phrasal verb
come to
To reach (a goal or objective):
Informal: hit on (or upon).
Translations
يَسْتَعيدُ الوَعْي
přijít k sobě
vakna, komast til meîvitundar
prísť k sebe

w>come to

vi
(= regain consciousness: also come to oneself) → wieder zu sich kommen
(Naut) → beidrehen
vi +prep obj
that will never come to muchdaraus wird nie etwas werden; that won’t come to muchdaraus wird nicht viel werden; that didn’t come to anythingdaraus ist nichts geworden
impers when it comes to mathematics …wenn es um Mathematik geht, …; when it comes to choosing, he …wenn er die Wahl hat or vor die Wahl gestellt wird, …; if it comes to that we’re sunkwenn es dazu kommt, sind wir verloren; come to that or if it comes to that, he’s just as goodwas das betrifft or an(be)langt, ist er genauso gut; let’s hope it never comes to a court case or to courtwollen wir hoffen, dass es nie zum Prozess kommt; it comes to the same thingdas kommt or läuft auf dasselbe hinaus
(price, bill) how much does it come to?wie viel macht das?; it comes to £20es kommt auf or beläuft sich auf £ 20; it comes to 50 dollars even (US) or to exactly 50 dollarses kostet genau 50 Dollar; it comes to much less/more than I thoughtes kommt viel billiger/teurer, als ich dachte
(= touch on) point, subject etckommen auf (+acc); (= tackle) problem, job etcherangehen an (+acc)
(in certain collocations) to come to a decisionzu einer Entscheidung kommen; it’s coming to something when …es will schon etwas heißen, wenn …; what are things or what is the world coming to!wohin soll das noch führen! ? blow1, lightetc

come

(kam) past tense came (keim) past participle come verb
1. to move etc towards the person speaking or writing, or towards the place being referred to by him. Come here!; Are you coming to the dance?; John has come to see me; Have any letters come for me?
2. to become near or close to something in time or space. Christmas is coming soon.
3. to happen or be situated. The letter `d' comes between `c' and è' in the alphabet.
4. (often with to) to happen (by accident). How did you come to break your leg?
5. to arrive at (a certain state etc). What are things coming to? We have come to an agreement.
6. (with to) (of numbers, prices etc) to amount (to). The total comes to 51.
interjection
expressing disapproval, drawing attention etc. Come, come! That was very rude of you!
ˈcomer noun
late-comers will not be admitted; We welcome all comers.
ˈcoming noun
the comings and goings of the people in the street.
ˈcomeback noun
a return (especially to show business). The actress made a comeback years after retiring.
ˈcomedown noun
a fall in dignity etc. The smaller car was a bit of a comedown after the Rolls Royce.
come about
to happen. How did that come about?
come across
to meet or find by chance. He came across some old friends.
come along
1. to come with or accompany the person speaking etc. Come along with me!
2. to progress. How are things coming along?
come by
to get. How did you come by that black eye?
come down
to decrease; to become less. Tea has come down in price.
come into one's own
to have the opportunity of showing what one can do etc. He has at last come into his own as a pop-singer.
come off
1. to fall off. Her shoe came off.
2. to turn out (well); to succeed. The gamble didn't come off.
come on
1. to appear on stage or the screen. They waited for the comedian to come on.
2. hurry up!. Come on – we'll be late for the party!
3. don't be ridiculous!. Come on, you don't really expect me to believe that!
come out
1. to become known. The truth finally came out.
2. to be published. This newspaper comes out once a week.
3. to strike. The men have come out (on strike).
4. (of a photograph) to be developed. This photograph has come out very well.
5. to be removed. This dirty mark won't come out.
come round
1. (also come around) to visit. Come round and see us soon.
2. to regain consciousness. After receiving anesthesia, don't expect to come round for at least twenty minutes.
come to
to regain consciousness. When will he come to after the operation?
come to light
to be discovered. The theft only came to light when the owners returned from holiday.
come upon
to meet, find or discover by chance. She came upon a solution to the problem.
come up with
to think of; to produce. He's come up with a great idea.
come what may
whatever happens. I'll give you my support, come what may!
to come
(in the) future. in the days to come.
References in classic literature ?
She had been ill in bed for several days and her son had not come to visit her.
When the second- and third-generation believers in Jesus began to question his second coming among them, the author of 2 Peter (second reading) encouraged the doubting and the hopeless that even though the delay might seem untenable, God would indeed come to them in Jesus.
So, when a relative would come to visit my parents, or when we would travel to visit our relatives, my brother and I would compete in trying to greet Grandpa first.
I have come to a place where my discipleship, my walk with Christ, requires telling the whole truth and paying whatever price truthfulness requires.