come up


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Related to come up: come up against

come

 (kŭm)
intr.v. came (kām), come, com·ing, comes
1.
a. To advance toward the speaker or toward a specified place; approach: Come to me.
b. To advance in a specified manner: The children came reluctantly when I insisted.
2.
a. To make progress; advance: a former drug addict who has come a long way.
b. To fare: How are things coming today? They're coming fine.
3.
a. To reach a particular point in a series or as a result of orderly progression: At last we came to the chapter on ergonomics.
b. To arrive, as in due course: Dawn comes at 5 am in June.
4. To move into view; appear: The moon came over the horizon.
5. To occur in time; take place: The game will be played tomorrow, come rain or shine.
6.
a. To arrive at a particular result or end: come to an understanding.
b. To arrive at or reach a particular state or condition: Come to your senses!
c. To move or be brought to a particular position: The convoy came to an abrupt halt.
7. To extend; reach: water that came to my waist.
8. To have priority; rank: My work comes first.
9. To happen as a result: This mess comes of your carelessness.
10. To fall to one: No good can come of this.
11. To occur in the mind: A good idea just came to me.
12.
a. To issue forth: A cry came from the frightened child.
b. To be derived; originate: Oaks come from acorns.
c. To be descended: They come from a good family.
d. To be within a given range or spectrum of reference or application: This stipulation comes within the terms of your contract.
13. To be a native or resident: My friend comes from Chicago.
14. To add up to a certain amount: Expenses came to more than income.
15.
a. To become: The knot came loose. This is a dream that has come true.
b. To turn out to be: A good education doesn't come cheap.
16. To be available or obtainable: shoes that come in all sizes.
17. Vulgar Slang To experience orgasm.
n. also cum (kŭm) Vulgar Slang
Semen ejaculated during orgasm.
Phrasal Verbs:
come about
1. To take place; happen.
2. To turn around.
3. Nautical To change tack.
come across
1. To meet or find by chance: came across my old college roommate in town today.
2. Slang
a. To do what is wanted.
b. To pay over money that is demanded: came across with the check.
3. To give an impression: "He comes across as a very sincere, religious individual" (William L. Clay).
come along
1. To make advances to a goal; progress: Things are coming along fine.
2. To go with someone else who takes the lead: I'll come along on the hike.
3. To show up; appear: Don't take the first offer that comes along.
come around (or round)
1. To recover, revive: fainted but soon came around.
2. To change one's opinion or position: You'll come around after you hear the whole story.
come at
1. To obtain; get: come at an education through study.
2. To rush at; attack.
come back
1. To return to or regain past success after a period of misfortune.
2. To retort; reply: came back with a sharp riposte.
3. To recur to the memory: It's all coming back to me now.
come between
To cause to be in conflict or estrangement.
come by
1. To gain possession of; acquire: Mortgages are hard to come by.
2. To pay a visit.
come down
1. To lose wealth or position: He has really come down in the world.
2.
a. To pass or be handed down by tradition: customs that come down from colonial times.
b. To be handed down from a higher authority: An indictment finally came down.
3. Slang To happen; occur: What's coming down tonight?
4. Slang To experience diminishing effects of a recreational or hallucinogenic drug.
come in
1.
a. To arrive: Fall clothes will be coming in soon.
b. To become available for use: New weather information just came in.
c. To start producing. Used of an oil well.
2. To arrive among those who finish a contest or race: came in fifth.
3. To perform or function in a particular way: A food processor comes in handy.
4. To reply in a specified manner to a call or signal: The pilot's voice came in loud and clear.
5. To take on a specified role: When editorial review commences, that's where you come in.
come into
To acquire, especially as an inheritance: She came into a fortune on her 21st birthday.
come off
1. To happen; occur: The trip came off on schedule.
2. To acquit oneself: She is sure to come off badly if challenged to explain.
3. To turn out to be successful: a party that came off.
come on
1. To convey a particular personal image: comes on as an old-fashioned reactionary.
2. Slang To show sexual interest in someone: trying to come on to me during the party.
3.
a. To progress or advance in increments: Darkness came on after seven.
b. To begin in small increments or by degrees: Sleet came on after one o'clock.
4. To hurry up; move rapidly. Often used in the imperative: Would you please come on! We'll be late!
5. To stop an inappropriate behavior; abandon a position or an attitude; be obliging. Used chiefly in the imperative: You've used the same feeble excuse for weeks. Come on!
come out
1. To become known: The whole story came out at the trial.
2. To be issued or brought out: The author's new book just came out.
3. To make a formal social debut: She came out at age 18 in New York City.
4. To end up; result: Everything came out wrong.
5. To declare oneself publicly: The governor came out in favor of tax breaks.
6. To reveal that one is a gay man, a lesbian, or a bisexual.
come over
1. To change sides, as in a controversy.
2. To pay a casual visit.
come through
1. To do what is required or anticipated: I asked for their help, and they came through.
2.
a. To become manifest: The parents' tenderness comes through in their facial expressions.
b. To be communicated: The coach's displeasure came through loud and clear.
come to
1. To recover consciousness: The fainting victim came to.
2. Nautical
a. To bring the bow into the wind.
b. To anchor.
come up
1. To manifest itself; arise: The question never came up.
2. To rise above the horizon: The sun came up.
3. To rise, as in status or rank: a general who came up from the ranks.
4. To draw near; approach: came up and said hello.
come upon
To discover or meet by accident.
come with Informal
To accompany someone; go along: I'm going to the store; do you want to come with?
Idioms:
come a cropper
To fail utterly.
come again
Used as a request to repeat what was said.
come clean
To confess all.
come down on
To punish, oppose, or reprimand severely and often with force: a district attorney who came down hard on drug dealers.
come down to
1. To confront or deal with forthrightly: When you come right down to it, you have to admit I'm correct.
2. To amount to in essence: It comes down to this: the man is a cheat.
come down with
To become sick with (an illness): came down with the flu.
come in for
To receive; be subjected to: came in for harsh criticism.
come into (one's) own
1. To get possession of what belongs to one.
2. To obtain rightful recognition or prosperity: a concert pianist who has at last come into his own.
come off it Slang
To stop acting or speaking foolishly or pretentiously. Often used in the imperative.
come out with
1. To put into words; say: always comes out with the truth.
2. To reveal publicly: came out with a new tax package.
come to blows
To begin a physical fight.
come to grief
To meet with disaster; fail.
come to grips with
To confront squarely and attempt to deal decisively with: "He had to come to grips with the proposition" (Louis Auchincloss).
come to light/hand
To be clearly revealed or disclosed: "A further problem ... came to light last summer as a result of post-flight inspections" (John Noble Wilford).
come to terms with
1. To come to accept; become reconciled to: finally came to terms with his lack of talent.
2. To reach mutual agreement: The warring factions have at last come to terms.
come true
To happen as predicted: My fondest dreams have at last come true.
come up against
To encounter, especially a difficulty or major problem.
come up with
To bring forth, discover, or produce: came up with a cure for the disease.

[Middle English comen, from Old English cuman; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

come up

vb (intr, adverb)
1. to come to a place regarded as higher
2. (Astronomy) (of the sun) to rise
3. to begin: a wind came up.
4. (Physiology) to be regurgitated or vomited
5. to present itself or be discussed: that question will come up again.
6. Brit to begin a term, esp one's first term, at a college or university
7. (Horticulture) to appear from out of the ground: my beans have come up early this year.
8. informal to win: have your premium bonds ever come up?.
9. come up against to be faced with; come into conflict or competition with
10. come up to to equal or meet (a standard): that just doesn't come up to scratch.
11. come up with to produce or find: she always comes up with the right answer.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.come up - bring forth, usually something desirable; "The committee came up with some interesting recommendations"
bring forth, generate - bring into existence; "The new manager generated a lot of problems"; "The computer bug generated chaos in the office"; "The computer generated this image"; "The earthquake generated a tsunami"
2.come up - result or issue; "A slight unpleasantness arose from this discussion"
hap, happen, occur, come about, take place, go on, pass off, fall out, pass - come to pass; "What is happening?"; "The meeting took place off without an incidence"; "Nothing occurred that seemed important"
condense - develop due to condensation; "All our planets condensed out of the same material"
open up, open - become available; "an opportunity opened up"
come up - be mentioned; "These names came up in the discussion"
3.come up - move toward, travel toward something or somebody or approach something or somebody; "He came singing down the road"; "Come with me to the Casbah"; "come down here!"; "come out of the closet!"; "come into the room"
emanate - proceed or issue forth, as from a source; "Water emanates from this hole in the ground"
accost, come up to, address - speak to someone
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
come near, approach - come near in time; "Winter is approaching"; "approaching old age"
approach, draw near, near, come near, come on, draw close, go up - move towards; "We were approaching our destination"; "They are drawing near"; "The enemy army came nearer and nearer"
4.come up - come to the surface
ascend, go up - travel up, "We ascended the mountain"; "go up a ladder"; "The mountaineers slowly ascended the steep slope"
emerge - come up to the surface of or rise; "He felt new emotions emerge"
resurface - reappear on the surface
bubble up, intumesce - move upwards in bubbles, as from the effect of heating; also used metaphorically; "Gases bubbled up from the earth"; "Marx's ideas have bubbled up in many places in Latin America"
well, swell - come up, as of a liquid; "Tears well in her eyes"; "the currents well up"
5.come up - originate or come into being; "a question arose"
become - come into existence; "What becomes has duration"
6.come up - move upwardcome up - move upward; "The fog lifted"; "The smoke arose from the forest fire"; "The mist uprose from the meadows"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
scend, surge - rise or heave upward under the influence of a natural force such as a wave; "the boats surged"
climb, climb up, go up, mount - go upward with gradual or continuous progress; "Did you ever climb up the hill behind your house?"
soar, soar up, soar upwards, surge, zoom - rise rapidly; "the dollar soared against the yen"
go up - be erected, built, or constructed; "New buildings are going up everywhere"
rocket, skyrocket - shoot up abruptly, like a rocket; "prices skyrocketed"
bubble - rise in bubbles or as if in bubbles; "bubble to the surface"
uplift - lift up from the earth, as by geologic forces; "the earth's movement uplifted this part of town"
chandelle - climb suddenly and steeply; "The airplane chandelled"
steam - rise as vapor
uprise, ascend, come up, rise - come up, of celestial bodies; "The sun also rises"; "The sun uprising sees the dusk night fled..."; "Jupiter ascends"
7.come up - be mentioned; "These names came up in the discussion"
come up, arise - result or issue; "A slight unpleasantness arose from this discussion"
8.come up - start running, functioning, or operating; "the lights went on"; "the computer came up"
get going, start, go - begin or set in motion; "I start at eight in the morning"; "Ready, set, go!"
9.come up - get something or somebody for a specific purpose; "I found this gadget that will serve as a bottle opener"; "I got hold of these tools to fix our plumbing"; "The chairman got hold of a secretary on Friday night to type the urgent letter"
acquire, get - come into the possession of something concrete or abstract; "She got a lot of paintings from her uncle"; "They acquired a new pet"; "Get your results the next day"; "Get permission to take a few days off from work"
10.come up - come up, of celestial bodiescome up - come up, of celestial bodies; "The sun also rises"; "The sun uprising sees the dusk night fled..."; "Jupiter ascends"
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
go up, rise, move up, lift, arise, come up, uprise - move upward; "The fog lifted"; "The smoke arose from the forest fire"; "The mist uprose from the meadows"
11.come up - gather (money or other resources) together over time; "She had scraped together enough money for college"; "they scratched a meager living"
nickel-and-dime - accumulate gradually; "she nickeled-and-dimed together a small house for her family"
collect, compile, accumulate, amass, roll up, hoard, pile up - get or gather together; "I am accumulating evidence for the man's unfaithfulness to his wife"; "She is amassing a lot of data for her thesis"; "She rolled up a small fortune"
12.come up - gather or bring together; "muster the courage to do something"; "she rallied her intellect"; "Summon all your courage"
gather, pull together, collect, garner - assemble or get together; "gather some stones"; "pull your thoughts together"
Translations
přistoupit
komme hen
tulla luokse
prići
上がる
다가가다
komma upp
เข้าไปใกล้
tiến lại

w>come up

vi
(lit)hochkommen; (upstairs) → hoch- or raufkommen; (diver, submarine)nach oben kommen; (sun, moon)aufgehen; do you come up to town often?kommen Sie oft in die Stadt?; he came up (to Oxford) last year (Univ) → er studiert seit letztem Jahr (in Oxford); you’ve come up in the worlddu bist ja richtig vornehm geworden!; he came up to me with a smileer kam lächelnd auf mich zu
(supplies, troops etc)herangeschafft werden
(Jur, case) → verhandelt werden, drankommen (inf); (accused)vor Gericht kommen
(plants)herauskommen
(matter for discussion)aufkommen, angeschnitten werden; (name)erwähnt werden; I can’t do it as I’m afraid something has come upich bin leider verhindert, ich kann leider nicht
(number in lottery etc)gewinnen; to come up for sale/auction etczum Verkauf/zur Auktion etc kommen; my contract will soon come up for renewalmein Vertrag muss bald verlängert werden
(post, job)frei werden
(exams, election) → bevorstehen
(= be vomited)wieder hochkommen
(= shine, show colour)herauskommen

come up

يَقْتَرِبُ přistoupit komme hen aufkommen πλησιάζω acercarse, subir tulla luokse monter prići spuntare fuori 上がる 다가가다 naar toelopen komme opp podejść surgir подходить komma upp เข้าไปใกล้ gündeme gelmek tiến lại 走近
References in classic literature ?
They've got a right to come up and buy drinks at the bar yonder forrard, and they take that chance to bribe somebody to keep watch on me--porter or boots or somebody.
Most individuals would find it hard to come up to his level.
He said: "I-- I'll come up to tennis if I can manage it," and went into the house.