comeback


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come·back

 (kŭm′băk′)
n.
1.
a. A return to formerly enjoyed status or prosperity: The film star made an unexpected comeback.
b. A return to popularity: Wide ties are making a comeback this year.
2. The act of making up a deficit, as in a contest or game.
3. A reply, especially a quick witty one; a retort.

comeback

(ˈkʌmˌbæk)
n
1. a return to a former position, status, etc
2. a return or response, esp recriminatory
3. a quick reply; retort
vb (intr, adverb)
4. to return
5. to become fashionable again
6. to reply after a period of consideration: I'll come back to you on that next week.
7. US and Canadian to argue back; retort
8. come back to someone (of something forgotten) to return to someone's memory

come•back

(ˈkʌmˌbæk)

n.
1. a return to the higher status, prosperity, or success of a former time.
2. a clever or effective retort; rejoinder; riposte.
3. a basis or cause of complaint.
[1815–25]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comeback - a quick reply to a question or remark (especially a witty or critical one); "it brought a sharp rejoinder from the teacher"
back talk, backtalk, sass, sassing, lip, mouth - an impudent or insolent rejoinder; "don't give me any of your sass"
reply, response - the speech act of continuing a conversational exchange; "he growled his reply"
2.comeback - return by a celebrity to some previously successful activity
reappearance, return - the act of someone appearing again; "his reappearance as Hamlet has been long awaited"

comeback

noun
1. (Informal) return, revival, rebound, resurgence, rally, recovery, triumph Sixties singing star Petula Clark is making a comeback.
2. response, reply, retort, retaliation, riposte, rejoinder I tried to think of a witty comeback.

comeback

noun
1. A return to former prosperity or status:
2. A spirited, incisive reply:
Translations
عَوْدَه
návrat
comebackfå en renæssance
endurkoma
dönüş

comeback

[ˈkʌmbæk] N
1. (= reaction) (usually adverse) → reacción f
2. (US) (= response) → réplica f; (witty) → respuesta f aguda
3. (= return) to make a comeback (Theat) → volver a las tablas (Cine) → volver a los platós
he is making a comeback to professional footballestá listo para volver al fútbol profesional
butter has made a comeback in the British dietla mantequilla ha recobrado su importancia en la dieta británica
4. (= redress) to have no comebackno poder pedir cuentas, no poder reclamar

comeback

[ˈkʌmbæk] n
[actor] → rentrée f; [entertainer] → come-back m inv; [sportsperson] → come-back m inv; [politician, party] → rentrée f; [fashion, style] → retour m
to make a comeback, to stage a comeback [sportsperson, team] → faire un come-back; [politician, party] → revenir sur le devant de la scène; [style, fashion] → faire un retour
(= response) → réponse f
(= redress) to have no comeback → n'avoir aucun recours

comeback

n
(Theat etc, fig) → Comeback nt, → Come-back nt; to make or stage a comebackein Comeback versuchen/machen
(inf: = redress) → Anspruch mauf Schadenersatz; (= reaction)Reaktion f; we’ve got no comeback in this situationwir können da nichts machen

comeback

[ˈkʌmˌbæk] n
a. (Theatre, Cine) → rentrée f, ritorno
to make a comeback → tornare sulle scene
b. (reaction) → reazione f; (response) → risultato, risposta

come

(kam) past tense came (keim) past participle come verb
1. to move etc towards the person speaking or writing, or towards the place being referred to by him. Come here!; Are you coming to the dance?; John has come to see me; Have any letters come for me?
2. to become near or close to something in time or space. Christmas is coming soon.
3. to happen or be situated. The letter `d' comes between `c' and è' in the alphabet.
4. (often with to) to happen (by accident). How did you come to break your leg?
5. to arrive at (a certain state etc). What are things coming to? We have come to an agreement.
6. (with to) (of numbers, prices etc) to amount (to). The total comes to 51.
interjection
expressing disapproval, drawing attention etc. Come, come! That was very rude of you!
ˈcomer noun
late-comers will not be admitted; We welcome all comers.
ˈcoming noun
the comings and goings of the people in the street.
ˈcomeback noun
a return (especially to show business). The actress made a comeback years after retiring.
ˈcomedown noun
a fall in dignity etc. The smaller car was a bit of a comedown after the Rolls Royce.
come about
to happen. How did that come about?
come across
to meet or find by chance. He came across some old friends.
come along
1. to come with or accompany the person speaking etc. Come along with me!
2. to progress. How are things coming along?
come by
to get. How did you come by that black eye?
come down
to decrease; to become less. Tea has come down in price.
come into one's own
to have the opportunity of showing what one can do etc. He has at last come into his own as a pop-singer.
come off
1. to fall off. Her shoe came off.
2. to turn out (well); to succeed. The gamble didn't come off.
come on
1. to appear on stage or the screen. They waited for the comedian to come on.
2. hurry up!. Come on – we'll be late for the party!
3. don't be ridiculous!. Come on, you don't really expect me to believe that!
come out
1. to become known. The truth finally came out.
2. to be published. This newspaper comes out once a week.
3. to strike. The men have come out (on strike).
4. (of a photograph) to be developed. This photograph has come out very well.
5. to be removed. This dirty mark won't come out.
come round
1. (also come around) to visit. Come round and see us soon.
2. to regain consciousness. After receiving anesthesia, don't expect to come round for at least twenty minutes.
come to
to regain consciousness. When will he come to after the operation?
come to light
to be discovered. The theft only came to light when the owners returned from holiday.
come upon
to meet, find or discover by chance. She came upon a solution to the problem.
come up with
to think of; to produce. He's come up with a great idea.
come what may
whatever happens. I'll give you my support, come what may!
to come
(in the) future. in the days to come.
References in periodicals archive ?
The singers are hoping to follow in the footsteps of Take That who sold out a huge tour and topped the charts with their comeback album last year.
Comeback correction: After further research, USC determined its comeback was equaled in 2002, when the Trojans also overcame a 21-3 deficit to California.
The Ina Brudnick Award winners also are joined by three young people recently named as the 2007 Comeback Kids.
NIGEL MANSELL: Former world champ quit Indycars for an F1 comeback with McLaren in 1995.
Adams Beverage Group, publisher of Stateways, Beverage Dynamics and Cheers beverage trade magazines geared towards the on- and off-premise spirits and restaurant industry, annually recognizes growth in beverage alcohol with four distinct categories: Fast Track, Rising Star, Established Growth and Comeback brands.
20 /PRNewswire/ -- The Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America (CCFA) and ConvaTec, a world-leading manufacturer of ostomy and wound care products, announced today the recipients of the Great Comebacks(R) Program 2006 Ina Brudnick Scholarship and the Comeback Kids awards.
That comeback attitude carried them through the postseason and to their first World Series title.
Adams Beverage Group, publisher of Stateways, Beverage Dynamics and Cheers beverage trade magazines, annually recognizes growth in beverage alcohol with four distinct categories: Fast Track, Rising Star, Established Growth and Comeback brands.
But some say the sighting in the Central Valley is a sign of a modest comeback.
Thorpe is reportedly training in private to gain back his confidence fefore making a formal announcement about his comeback.
FORMER undisputed world heavyweight champion Lennox Lewis is planning a comeback - according to Vitali Klitschko.
Pulled off a comeback that defied belief, not to mention all basketball logic.