comedown

(redirected from comedowns)
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come·down

 (kŭm′doun′)
n.
1. A decline to a lower status or level.
2.
a. A feeling of disappointment or depression.
b. A cause of disappointment or depression.

comedown

(ˈkʌmˌdaʊn)
n
1. a decline in position, status, or prosperity
2. informal a disappointment
3. slang a depressed or unexcited state
vb (intr, adverb)
4. to come to a place regarded as lower
5. to lose status, wealth, etc (esp in the phrase to come down in the world)
6. to reach a decision: the report came down in favour of a pay increase.
7. (often foll by to) to be handed down or acquired by tradition or inheritance
8. (Education) Brit to leave college or university
9. (foll by with) to succumb (to illness or disease)
10. (foll by on) to rebuke or criticize harshly
11. (foll by to) to amount in essence (to): it comes down to two choices.
12. (Recreational Drugs) slang to lose the effects of a drug and return to a normal or more normal state
13. (Physical Geography) informal Austral (of a river) to flow in flood

come•down

(ˈkʌmˌdaʊn)

n.
an unexpected or humiliating descent from dignity, importance, or wealth.
[1555–65]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.comedown - decline to a lower status or level
abasement, humiliation - depriving one of self-esteem

comedown

noun
1. decline, reverse, demotion His new job is a comedown after the high office he held previously.
2. (Informal) disappointment, blow, humiliation, whammy (informal, chiefly U.S.), letdown, anticlimax After all the build-up, the wedding itself was a bit of a comedown.

comedown

noun
A sudden drop to a lower condition or status:
Translations
هُبوط، نُزول
úpadek
nedtur
lecsúszás
hrap; fall úr sessi
saygınlığını yitirme

comedown

[ˈkʌmdaʊn] N (= humiliation) → humillación f
the house is a bit of a comedown from the mansion she is used tola casa representa un cierto bajón de nivel en comparación con la mansión a la que ha estado acostumbrada

comedown

[ˈkʌmdaʊn] ndéchéance f

comedown

n (inf)Abstieg m

comedown

[ˈkʌmˌdaʊn] n no plpasso indietro

come

(kam) past tense came (keim) past participle come verb
1. to move etc towards the person speaking or writing, or towards the place being referred to by him. Come here!; Are you coming to the dance?; John has come to see me; Have any letters come for me?
2. to become near or close to something in time or space. Christmas is coming soon.
3. to happen or be situated. The letter `d' comes between `c' and è' in the alphabet.
4. (often with to) to happen (by accident). How did you come to break your leg?
5. to arrive at (a certain state etc). What are things coming to? We have come to an agreement.
6. (with to) (of numbers, prices etc) to amount (to). The total comes to 51.
interjection
expressing disapproval, drawing attention etc. Come, come! That was very rude of you!
ˈcomer noun
late-comers will not be admitted; We welcome all comers.
ˈcoming noun
the comings and goings of the people in the street.
ˈcomeback noun
a return (especially to show business). The actress made a comeback years after retiring.
ˈcomedown noun
a fall in dignity etc. The smaller car was a bit of a comedown after the Rolls Royce.
come about
to happen. How did that come about?
come across
to meet or find by chance. He came across some old friends.
come along
1. to come with or accompany the person speaking etc. Come along with me!
2. to progress. How are things coming along?
come by
to get. How did you come by that black eye?
come down
to decrease; to become less. Tea has come down in price.
come into one's own
to have the opportunity of showing what one can do etc. He has at last come into his own as a pop-singer.
come off
1. to fall off. Her shoe came off.
2. to turn out (well); to succeed. The gamble didn't come off.
come on
1. to appear on stage or the screen. They waited for the comedian to come on.
2. hurry up!. Come on – we'll be late for the party!
3. don't be ridiculous!. Come on, you don't really expect me to believe that!
come out
1. to become known. The truth finally came out.
2. to be published. This newspaper comes out once a week.
3. to strike. The men have come out (on strike).
4. (of a photograph) to be developed. This photograph has come out very well.
5. to be removed. This dirty mark won't come out.
come round
1. (also come around) to visit. Come round and see us soon.
2. to regain consciousness. After receiving anesthesia, don't expect to come round for at least twenty minutes.
come to
to regain consciousness. When will he come to after the operation?
come to light
to be discovered. The theft only came to light when the owners returned from holiday.
come upon
to meet, find or discover by chance. She came upon a solution to the problem.
come up with
to think of; to produce. He's come up with a great idea.
come what may
whatever happens. I'll give you my support, come what may!
to come
(in the) future. in the days to come.
References in periodicals archive ?
Soon he's rich, successful and attracting the interest of a finance tycoon - until the mother of all comedowns kicks in.
As comedowns go, this ranked up there with Bill Buckner's tank job in the '86 World Series.