comely


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.

come·ly

 (kŭm′lē)
adj. come·li·er, come·li·est
1. Pleasing and wholesome in appearance; attractive. See Synonyms at beautiful.
2. Suitable; seemly: comely behavior.

[Middle English comli, alteration (probably influenced by bicomli, seemly) of cumli, from Old English cȳmlic, lovely, delicate, from cȳme, beautiful.]

come′li·ness n.

comely

(ˈkʌmlɪ)
adj, -lier or -liest
archaic good-looking; attractive
[Old English cӯmlīc beautiful; related to Old High German cūmi frail, Middle High German komlīche suitably]
ˈcomeliness n

come•ly

(ˈkʌm li, ˈkɒm-, ˈkoʊm-)

adj. -li•er, -li•est.
1. pleasing in appearance; attractive; good-looking.
2. proper; seemly; becoming.
[before 1000; Middle English cumli, Old English cȳmlīc lovely =cȳme exquisite (c. Middle High German kūme weak, tender) + -līc -ly]
come′li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.comely - according with custom or propriety; "her becoming modesty"; "comely behavior"; "it is not comme il faut for a gentleman to be constantly asking for money"; "a decent burial"; "seemly behavior"
proper - marked by suitability or rightness or appropriateness; "proper medical treatment"; "proper manners"
2.comely - very pleasing to the eye; "my bonny lass"; "there's a bonny bay beyond"; "a comely face"; "young fair maidens"
beautiful - delighting the senses or exciting intellectual or emotional admiration; "a beautiful child"; "beautiful country"; "a beautiful painting"; "a beautiful theory"; "a beautiful party"

comely

adjective
1. (Old-fashioned) good-looking, pretty, fair, beautiful, attractive, lovely, handsome, blooming, cute, graceful, becoming, pleasing, wholesome, bonny, winsome, buxom She was a large, comely girl with a mass of dark brown hair.
homely, plain, ugly, unattractive, distasteful, repulsive, disagreeable, mumsy

comely

adjective
Translations
وَسيم، جَميل
půvabný
kønpæn
csinoskedveskellemes
snotur
dailumasdailus
piemīlīgs
vzhľadný

comely

[ˈkʌmlɪ] ADJ (comelier (compar) (comeliest (superl))) (liter) → lindo

comely

[ˈkʌmli] adj (old-fashioned) [girl, woman] → beau(belle)

comely

adj (+er) (liter)wohlgestaltet (geh)

comely

[ˈkʌmlɪ] adj (liter) → avvenente

comely

(ˈkamli) adjective
(usually of women) pleasant to look at.
ˈcomeliness noun
References in classic literature ?
Madame Aubain had married a comely youth without any money, who died in the beginning of 1809, leaving her with two young children and a number of debts.
Where indeed would be your lyre and your love-tricks, your comely locks and your fair favour, when you were lying in the dust before him?
It is a strange thing, to note the excess of this passion, and how it braves the nature, and value of things, by this; that the speaking in a perpetual hyperbole, is comely in nothing but in love.
She was not partic- ularly comely and there was a black smudge on the side of her nose.
The door was opened by a comely young woman, with ruddy cheeks and a bright kind eye that promised conversation.
She bare him a son Hippotades in the palace, and comely Thero who was like the beams of the moon.
This Jenny Jones was no very comely girl, either in her face or person; but nature had somewhat compensated the want of beauty with what is generally more esteemed by those ladies whose judgment is arrived at years of perfect maturity, for she had given her a very uncommon share of understanding.
Parmenitch, a talkative, comely old man, gave Levin a very warm welcome, showed him all he was doing, told him everything about his bees and the swarms of that year; but gave vague and unwilling answers to Levin's inquiries about the mowing.
These women were much more comely, or rather less hideous than those of Tsa's people; one of them, even, was almost pretty, being less hairy and having a rather nice skin, with high coloring.
I will spare the woman and take her with me to the Kro-lu, for she is comely.
The Widow Cooper--affectionately called "Aunt Patsy" by everybody-- lived in a snug and comely cottage with her daughter Rowena, who was nineteen, romantic, amiable, and very pretty, but otherwise of no consequence.
I owned "that the HOUYHNHNMS among us, whom we called horses, were the most generous and comely animals we had; that they excelled in strength and swiftness; and when they belonged to persons of quality, were employed in travelling, racing, or drawing chariots; they were treated with much kindness and care, till they fell into diseases, or became foundered in the feet; but then they were sold, and used to all kind of drudgery till they died; after which their skins were stripped, and sold for what they were worth, and their bodies left to be devoured by dogs and birds of prey.