comics


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Related to comics: Comic strips

com·ic

 (kŏm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Characteristic of or having to do with comedy.
2. Of or relating to comic strips.
3. Amusing; humorous: a comic situation involving the family's pets.
n.
1.
a. A comedian.
b. A person whose behavior elicits laughter.
2.
a. comics Comic strips.
b. A comic book.
3. A source of humor in art or life.

[Middle English comice, from Latin cōmicus, from Greek kōmikos, from kōmos, revel.]
Translations
sarjakuvasarjakuva-albumisarjakuvakirjasarjakuvasivu
strip
References in classic literature ?
Serve `em all jolly well right, and I'd go and sing comic songs on the ruins.
To take an obvious example, the comic mask is ugly and distorted, but does not imply pain.
The serious exhibited a certain number of heathen gods and heroes, who were certainly the worst and dullest company into which an audience was ever introduced; and (which was a secret known to few) were actually intended so to be, in order to contrast the comic part of the entertainment, and to display the tricks of harlequin to the better advantage.
Yates; on the comic, Tom Bertram, not quite alone, because it was evident that Mary Crawford's wishes, though politely kept back, inclined the same way: but his determinateness and his power seemed to make allies unnecessary; and, independent of this great irreconcilable difference, they wanted a piece containing very few characters in the whole, but every character first-rate, and three principal women.
That'h Jack the Giant Killer - piethe of comic infant bithnith,' said Sleary.
These and the rest of a shy man's troubles are always very amusing to other people, and have afforded material for comic writing from time immemorial.
It is a parody of the warlike epic, but has little in it that is really comic or of literary merit, except perhaps the list of quaint arms assumed by the warriors.
1276b] say the men are the same, but the city is different: for if a city is a community, it is a community of citizens; but if the mode of government should alter, and become of another sort, it would seem a necessary consequence that the city is not the same; as we regard the tragic chorus as different from the comic, though it may probably consist of the same performers: thus every other community or composition is said to be different if the species of composition is different; as in music the same hands produce different harmony, as the Doric and Phrygian.
He was a charlatan but a successful charlatan, and in that was always something for the comic spirit to rejoice in.
There are scenes of all sorts; some dreadful combats, some grand and lofty horse-riding, some scenes of high life, and some of very middling indeed; some love-making for the sentimental, and some light comic business; the whole accompanied by appropriate scenery and brilliantly illuminated with the Author's own candles.
In point of fact it's Florian, that famous French acrobat and comic actor; I knew him years ago out West (he was a French-Canadian by birth), and he seems to have business for me, though I hardly guess what.
And Herbert had seen him as a predatory Tartar of comic propensities, with a face like a red brick, and an outrageous hat all over bells.