comics


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Related to comics: Comic strips

com·ic

 (kŏm′ĭk)
adj.
1. Characteristic of or having to do with comedy.
2. Of or relating to comic strips.
3. Amusing; humorous: a comic situation involving the family's pets.
n.
1.
a. A comedian.
b. A person whose behavior elicits laughter.
2.
a. comics Comic strips.
b. A comic book.
3. A source of humor in art or life.

[Middle English comice, from Latin cōmicus, from Greek kōmikos, from kōmos, revel.]
Translations
sarjakuvasarjakuva-albumisarjakuvakirjasarjakuvasivu
strip
References in classic literature ?
Damon named a certain comic moving picture star in whose horse-play Mr.
A small band of them were lying on their stomachs on the floor looking at the colored sheets of the comic papers which Mr.
A gay robe of scarlet and yellow plaid, carefully made and neatly fitted, set off to advantage the dark and rich style of his beauty; and a certain comic air of assurance, blended with bashfulness, showed that he had been not unused to being petted and noticed by his master.
And Herbert had seen him as a predatory Tartar of comic propensities, with a face like a red brick, and an outrageous hat all over bells.
The hermit cast a wistful look upon the knight, in which there was a sort of comic expression of hesitation, as if uncertain how far be should act prudently in trusting his guest.
In the representations of the Comic poets, and in the opinion of the multitude, he had been identified with the teachers of physical science and with the Sophists.
replied the stout man, casting a sorrowfully comic look at a sign-post about a hundred feet away.
To take an obvious example, the comic mask is ugly and distorted, but does not imply pain.
Yates; on the comic, Tom Bertram, not quite alone, because it was evident that Mary Crawford's wishes, though politely kept back, inclined the same way: but his determinateness and his power seemed to make allies unnecessary; and, independent of this great irreconcilable difference, they wanted a piece containing very few characters in the whole, but every character first-rate, and three principal women.
Once returned from the abysms of the utter North to that little house upon the outskirts of Meudon, it was not the philosopher, the daring observer, the man of iron energy that imposed himself on his family, but a fat and even plaintive jester, a farceur incarnate and kindly, the co-equal of his children, and, it must be written, not seldom the comic despair of Madame Lavalle, who, as she writes five years after the marriage, to her venerable mother, found "in this unequalled intellect whose name I bear the abandon of a large and very untidy boy.
At the same time the futility of it had, it cannot be denied, a comic effect.
I, even I, have won a great victory for the Comic Muse.