commandeer


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com·man·deer

 (kŏm′ən-dîr′)
tr.v. com·man·deered, com·man·deer·ing, com·man·deers
1. To seize for military or police use; confiscate.
2. To take arbitrarily or by force: "He was at Columbia when students commandeered buildings and the police sprayed the protesters with tear gas" (Gary Rivlin). See Synonyms at appropriate.
3. To force into military service.

[Afrikaans kommandeer, from early Modern Dutch commanderen, from French commander, to command, from Old French comander; see command.]

commandeer

(ˌkɒmənˈdɪə)
vb (tr)
1. to seize for public or military use
2. to seize arbitrarily
[C19: from Afrikaans kommandeer, from French commander to command]

com•man•deer

(ˌkɒm ənˈdɪər)

v.t.
1. to order or force into active military service.
2. to seize (private property) for military or other public use.
3. to seize arbitrarily.
[1880–85; < Afrikaans kommandeer < French commander to command]

commandeer


Past participle: commandeered
Gerund: commandeering

Imperative
commandeer
commandeer
Present
I commandeer
you commandeer
he/she/it commandeers
we commandeer
you commandeer
they commandeer
Preterite
I commandeered
you commandeered
he/she/it commandeered
we commandeered
you commandeered
they commandeered
Present Continuous
I am commandeering
you are commandeering
he/she/it is commandeering
we are commandeering
you are commandeering
they are commandeering
Present Perfect
I have commandeered
you have commandeered
he/she/it has commandeered
we have commandeered
you have commandeered
they have commandeered
Past Continuous
I was commandeering
you were commandeering
he/she/it was commandeering
we were commandeering
you were commandeering
they were commandeering
Past Perfect
I had commandeered
you had commandeered
he/she/it had commandeered
we had commandeered
you had commandeered
they had commandeered
Future
I will commandeer
you will commandeer
he/she/it will commandeer
we will commandeer
you will commandeer
they will commandeer
Future Perfect
I will have commandeered
you will have commandeered
he/she/it will have commandeered
we will have commandeered
you will have commandeered
they will have commandeered
Future Continuous
I will be commandeering
you will be commandeering
he/she/it will be commandeering
we will be commandeering
you will be commandeering
they will be commandeering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been commandeering
you have been commandeering
he/she/it has been commandeering
we have been commandeering
you have been commandeering
they have been commandeering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been commandeering
you will have been commandeering
he/she/it will have been commandeering
we will have been commandeering
you will have been commandeering
they will have been commandeering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been commandeering
you had been commandeering
he/she/it had been commandeering
we had been commandeering
you had been commandeering
they had been commandeering
Conditional
I would commandeer
you would commandeer
he/she/it would commandeer
we would commandeer
you would commandeer
they would commandeer
Past Conditional
I would have commandeered
you would have commandeered
he/she/it would have commandeered
we would have commandeered
you would have commandeered
they would have commandeered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.commandeer - take arbitrarily or by force; "The Cubans commandeered the plane and flew it to Miami"
crime, criminal offence, criminal offense, law-breaking, offense, offence - (criminal law) an act punishable by law; usually considered an evil act; "a long record of crimes"
seize - take or capture by force; "The terrorists seized the politicians"; "The rebels threaten to seize civilian hostages"
skyjack - subject an aircraft to air piracy; "the plane was skyjacked to Uzbekistan"
carjack - take someone's car from him by force, usually with the intention of stealing it; "My car was carjacked last night!"

commandeer

verb seize, appropriate, hijack, confiscate, requisition, sequester, expropriate, sequestrate The soldiers commandeered vehicles in the capital.

commandeer

verb
1. To take quick and forcible possession of:
Idiom: help oneself to.
2. To lay claim to for oneself or as one's right:
Translations
يُصادِر لأغْراض عَسْكَرِيَّه
zabrat
beslaglægge
katonai célra igénybe vesz
gera upptækan
nusavintirekvizuoti
rekvizēt

commandeer

[ˌkɒmənˈdɪəʳ] VT
1. (= requisition) [+ building, stores, ship etc] → requisar, expropiar; [+ men] → reclutar a la fuerza
2.tomar, apropiarse (de)

commandeer

[ˌkɒmənˈdɪər] vt
(MILITARY) [+ vehicle, building] → réquisitionner (par la force)
(= take possession of) → s'approprier

commandeer

vt (Mil) meneinziehen; (from another battalion, fig) → abbeordern, abkommandieren; stores, ship, car etc (lit, fig)beschlagnahmen, requirieren

commandeer

[ˌkɒmənˈdɪəʳ] vtrequisire

commandeer

(komənˈdiə) verb
to seize (private property) for use by the army etc during wartime. They commandeered the castle.
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