commensurate


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to commensurate: thesaurus

com·men·su·rate

 (kə-mĕn′sər-ĭt, -shər-)
adj.
1. Of the same size, extent, or duration as another.
2. Corresponding in size or degree; proportionate: a salary commensurate with my performance.
3. Measurable by a common standard; commensurable.

[Late Latin commēnsūrātus : Latin com-, com- + mēnsūrātus (from past participle of mēnsūrāre, to measure, from Latin mēnsūra, measure; see measure).]

com·men′su·rate·ly adv.
com·men′su·ra′tion n.

commensurate

(kəˈmɛnsərɪt; -ʃə-)
adj
1. having the same extent or duration
2. corresponding in degree, amount, or size; proportionate
3. able to be measured by a common standard; commensurable
[C17: from Late Latin commēnsūrātus, from Latin com- same + mēnsurāre to measure]
comˈmensurately adv
comˈmensurateness n
commensuration n

com•men•su•rate

(kəˈmɛn sər ɪt, -ʃər-)

adj.
1. of equal extent or duration.
2. corresponding in amount, magnitude, or degree; proportionate: a sentence commensurate with the crime.
[1635–45; < Late Latin commēnsūrātus= Latin com- com- + mēnsūrātus, past participle of mēnsūrāre to measure]
com•men′su•rate•ly, adv.
com•men′su•rate•ness, n.
com•men`su•ra′tion (-ˈreɪ ʃən) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.commensurate - corresponding in size or degree or extent; "pay should be commensurate with the time worked"
equal - having the same quantity, value, or measure as another; "on equal terms"; "all men are equal before the law"
incommensurate - not corresponding in size or degree or extent; "a reward incommensurate with his effort"

commensurate

adjective
1. equivalent, consistent, corresponding, comparable, compatible, in accord, proportionate, coextensive Employees are paid salaries commensurate with those of teachers.
2. appropriate, fitting, fit, due, sufficient, adequate The resources available are in no way commensurate to the need.

commensurate

adjective
Properly or correspondingly related in size, amount, or scale:
Translations

commensurate

[kəˈmenʃərɪt] ADJ commensurate withen proporción a, que corresponde a
"salary commensurate with experience"sueldo según experiencia

commensurate

[kəˈmɛnsərɪt] adj
commensurate with, commensurate to → proportionné(e) à

commensurate

adjentsprechend (→ with +dat); to be commensurate with somethingeiner Sache (dat)entsprechen; they made salaries commensurate with those in comparable professionsdie Gehälter wurden denen in vergleichbaren Berufen angeglichen

commensurate

[kəˈmɛnʃrɪt] adj commensurate withproporzionato/a a, commisurato/a a
References in classic literature ?
It struck him, as he gazed at the admirable structures and the wonderful precautions of their sagacious inmates, that even the brutes of these vast wilds were possessed of an instinct nearly commensurate with his own reason; and he could not reflect, without anxiety, on the unequal contest that he had so rashly courted.
Let him be left to feel his way in the dark; let darkness commensurate with his crime hover over him; and let him feel that at every step he takes, in pursuit of the flying bondman, he is running the frightful risk of having his hot brains dashed out by an invisible agency.
This idea admits not of precise demonstration, because there is no rule by which we can measure the momentum of civil power necessary to the government of any given number of individuals; but when we consider that the island of Britain, nearly commensurate with each of the supposed confederacies, contains about eight millions of people, and when we reflect upon the degree of authority required to direct the passions of so large a society to the public good, we shall see no reason to doubt that the like portion of power would be sufficient to perform the same task in a society far more numerous.
On a comparison of this extent with that of several countries in Europe, the practicability of rendering our system commensurate to it appears to be demonstrable.
There was evidently a severe struggle in the mind of Caderousse; it was plain that the small shagreen case, which he turned over and over in his hand, did not seem to him commensurate in value to the enormous sum which fascinated his gaze.
The stakes were high and the risk was great; the prize therefore must have been commensurate.
From neither party, when in power, has the world any benefit to expect in science, art, or humanity, at all commensurate with the resources of the nation.
The sum was made commensurate with the importance of the enterprise.
The only conception that can explain the movement of the locomotive is that of a force commensurate with the movement observed.
But something held him back: not so much [31] a reluctancy of temperament, or of physical constitution (common enough cause why men of undeniable gifts fail of commensurate production) but a cause purely intellectual--the presence in him, namely, of a certain vein of opinion; that other, constituent but contending, person, in his complex nature.
So White Fang could only eat his heart in bitterness and develop a hatred and malice commensurate with the ferocity and indomitability of his nature.
I required two, three, or four drinks to get an effect commensurate with the effect the average man got out of one drink.