committed


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com·mit

 (kə-mĭt′)
v. com·mit·ted, com·mit·ting, com·mits
v.tr.
1. To do, perform, or perpetrate: commit a murder.
2. To put in trust or charge; entrust: commit oneself to the care of a doctor; commit responsibilities to an assistant.
3. To consign for future use or for preservation: We must commit the necessary funds for the project.
4. To place officially in confinement or custody, as in a mental health facility.
5. To put into a place to be disposed of or kept safe: committed the manuscript to the flames.
6.
a. To make known the views of (oneself) on an issue: I never commit myself on such issues.
b. To bind, obligate, or devote, as by a pledge: They were committed to follow orders. She committed herself to her art.
7. To refer (a legislative bill, for example) to a committee.
v.intr.
To pledge, obligate, or devote one's own self: felt that he was too young to commit fully to marriage.

[Middle English committen, from Latin committere : com-, com- + mittere, to send.]

com·mit′ta·ble adj.

committed

(kəˈmɪtɪd)
adj
1. having a strong commitment to an ideology, religion, etc
2. supporting; in favour of
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.committed - bound or obligated, as under a pledge to a particular cause, action, or attitude; "committed church members"; "a committed Marxist"
uncommitted - not bound or pledged
2.committed - associated in an exclusive sexual relationshipcommitted - associated in an exclusive sexual relationship
loving - feeling or showing love and affection; "loving parents"; "loving glances"

committed

adjective
1. dedicated, devoted, loyal, intent, faithful, devout, resolute, adherent, dutiful He said the government remained committed to attaining peace.
2. pledged, involved, promised, tied, engaged, obliged, duty-bound It would have meant cancelling several meetings which I was already committed to.
Translations
مُلْتَزِم بِ
angažovanýzavázaný
engagere sig
elkötelezett
skuldbundinn; staîfastur
angažovaný
kendini adamış

committed

[kəˈmɪtɪd] ADJcomprometido
a committed writerun escritor comprometido

committed

[kəˈmɪtɪd] adj
[writer, politician] → engagé(e); [Christian] → convaincu(e)
to be committed to sth [+ aim] → être attaché(e) à qch

committed

adj (= dedicated)engagiert; he is so committed to his work that …er geht so in seiner Arbeit auf, dass …; all his life he has been committed to this causeer hat sich sein Leben lang für diese Sache eingesetzt

committed

[kəˈmɪtɪd] adj (Christian) → convinto/a; (writer) → impegnato/a

commit

(kəˈmit) past tense past participle comˈmitted verb
1. to perform; to do (especially something illegal). He committed the murder when he was drunk.
2. to hand over (a person) to an institution etc for treatment, safekeeping etc. committed to prison.
3. to put (oneself) under a particular obligation. She has committed herself to looking after her dead brother's children till the age of 18.
comˈmitment noun
obligation. She could not take the job because of family commitments.
comˈmittal noun
the act of committing (to an institution).
comˈmitted adjective
pledged to do, or to support, something. He was committed to looking after his uncle; He is a committed socialist.
References in classic literature ?
The serene Teuton found the supper table and was happy, eating steadily through the bill of fare, and dismayed the garcons by the ravages he committed.
The reproofs she committed to memory, going about the garden and saying them aloud like an actor memorizing his part.
Of offense, I hope there is none, to either party: of defense, I make none--by God's good mercy, having committed no palpable sin since last entreating his pardoning grace.
They tried to withdraw the charge, but he'd been committed.
Carr, fully convinced of his utter failure, but, like most weak creatures, consoling himself with the reflection that he had not shown his hand or committed himself.
And allowing that, many, many years ago, in his early and reckless youth, he had committed some one wrong act,--or that, even now, the inevitable force of circumstances should occasionally make him do one questionable deed among a thousand praiseworthy, or, at least, blameless ones,--would you characterize the Judge by that one necessary deed, and that half-forgotten act, and let it overshadow the fair aspect of a lifetime?
Mindful, however, of her own errors and misfortunes, she early sought to impose a tender but strict control over the infant immortality that was committed to her charge.
If I had been downright honest with myself, I would have seen very plainly in my heart that I did but half fancy being committed this way to so long a voyage, without once laying my eyes on the man who was to be the absolute dictator of it, so soon as the ship sailed out upon the open sea.
We heard afterward that he had given his evidence so clearly, and the horses were in such an exhausted state, bearing marks of such brutal usage, that the carter was committed to take his trial, and might possibly be sentenced to two or three months in prison.
It was like some horrible crime committed in a dungeon, all unseen and unheeded, buried out of sight and of memory.
Miss Ophelia had listened to this conversation with an air of shrewd, observant gravity; and she still kept her lips tightly compressed, as if determined fully to ascertain her longitude and position, before she committed herself.
When sometimes I am reminded that the mechanics and shopkeepers stay in their shops not only all the forenoon, but all the afternoon too, sitting with crossed legs, so many of them--as if the legs were made to sit upon, and not to stand or walk upon--I think that they deserve some credit for not having all committed suicide long ago.