common


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com·mon

 (kŏm′ən)
adj. com·mon·er, com·mon·est
1.
a. Belonging equally to or shared equally by two or more; joint: common interests.
b. Of or relating to the community as a whole; public: for the common good.
2. Widespread; prevalent: Gas stations became common as the use of cars grew.
3.
a. Occurring frequently or habitually; usual: It is common for movies to last 90 minutes or more.
b. Most widely known; ordinary: the common housefly.
4. Having no special designation, status, or rank: a common sailor.
5.
a. Not distinguished by superior or noteworthy characteristics; average: the common spectator.
b. Of no special quality; standard: common procedure.
c. Of mediocre or inferior quality; second-rate: common cloth.
6. Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar: behavior that branded him as common.
7. Grammar
a. Either masculine or feminine in gender.
b. Representing one or all of the members of a class; not designating a unique entity.
n.
1. commons The common people; commonalty.
2. commons (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. The social class composed of commoners.
b. The parliamentary representatives of this class.
3. Commons The House of Commons.
4. A tract of land, usually in a centrally located spot, belonging to or used by a community as a whole: a band concert on the village common.
5. The legal right of a person to use the lands or waters of another, as for fishing.
6. commons (used with a sing. verb) A building or hall for dining, typically at a university or college.
7. Common stock.
8. Ecclesiastical A service used for a particular class of festivals.
Idiom:
in common
Equally with or by all.

[Middle English commune, from Old French commun, from Latin commūnis; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

com′mon·ly adv.
com′mon·ness n.
Synonyms: common, ordinary, familiar
These adjectives describe what is generally known or frequently encountered. Common applies to what takes place often, is widely used, or is well known: The botanist studied the common dandelion. The term also implies coarseness or a lack of distinction: My wallet was stolen by a common thief. Ordinary describes something usual that is indistinguishable from others, sometimes derogatorily: A ballpoint pen is adequate for ordinary purposes. The critic gave the ordinary performance a mediocre review. Familiar applies to what is well known or quickly recognized: Most children can recite familiar nursery rhymes. See Also Synonyms at general.

common

(ˈkɒmən)
adj
1. belonging to or shared by two or more people: common property.
2. belonging to or shared by members of one or more nations or communities; public: a common culture.
3. of ordinary standard; average: common decency.
4. prevailing; widespread: common opinion.
5. widely known or frequently encountered; ordinary: a common brand of soap.
6. widely known and notorious: a common nuisance.
7. derogatory considered by the speaker to be low-class, vulgar, or coarse: a common accent.
8. (prenominal) having no special distinction, rank, or status: the common man.
9. (Mathematics) maths
a. having a specified relationship with a group of numbers or quantities: common denominator.
b. (of a tangent) tangential to two or more circles
10. (Phonetics & Phonology) prosody (of a syllable) able to be long or short, or (in nonquantitative verse) stressed or unstressed
11. (Grammar) grammar (in certain languages) denoting or belonging to a gender of nouns, esp one that includes both masculine and feminine referents: Latin sacerdos is common.
12. (Anatomy) anatomy
a. having branches: the common carotid artery.
b. serving more than one function: the common bile duct.
13. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity of or relating to the common of the Mass or divine office
14. common or garden informal ordinary; unexceptional
n
15. (Physical Geography) (sometimes plural) a tract of open public land, esp one now used as a recreation area
16. (Law) law the right to go onto someone else's property and remove natural products, as by pasturing cattle or fishing (esp in the phrase right of common)
17. (Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity
a. a form of the proper of the Mass used on festivals that have no special proper of their own
b. the ordinary of the Mass
18. archaic the ordinary people; the public, esp those undistinguished by rank or title
19. in common mutually held or used with another or others
[C13: from Old French commun, from Latin commūnis general, universal]
ˈcommonness n

com•mon

(ˈkɒm ən)

adj. -er, -est,
n. adj.
1. belonging equally to, or shared alike by, two or more or all in question: common objectives.
2. pertaining or belonging equally to an entire community, nation, or culture: a common language.
3. joint; united: a common defense.
4. widespread; general; universal: common knowledge.
5. of frequent occurrence; usual; familiar: a common mistake.
6. of mediocre or inferior quality; mean: a rough, common fabric.
7. coarse; vulgar: common manners.
8. lacking rank, station, distinction, etc.; ordinary: a common soldier.
9. in keeping with accepted standards; fundamental: common decency.
10. (of a syllable) able to be considered as either long or short.
11.
a. (of a grammatical case) fulfilling different functions that in some languages would require different inflected forms: English nouns used as subject or object are in the common case.
b. of or pertaining to a word or gender that may refer to either a male or female: Frenchélève “pupil” has common gender.
c. constituting a gender comprising nouns that were formerly masculine or feminine: Dutch nouns are either common or neuter in gender.
12. bearing a similar mathematical relation to two or more entities.
13. of or pertaining to common stock.
n.
14. Often, commons. a tract of land owned or used jointly by the residents of a community, as a central square or park in a city or town.
15. the right, in common with other persons, to pasture animals on another's land or to fish in another's waters.
16. commons,
a. the common people; commonalty.
b. the body of people not of noble birth, as represented by the House of Commons.
c. (cap.) (used with a sing. v.) the House of Commons.
17. commons,
a. (used with a sing. v.) a large dining room, esp. at a university or college.
b. (usu. with a pl. v.) food or provisions for any group.
18. (sometimes cap.)
a. an ecclesiastical office or form of service used on a festival of a particular kind.
b. the ordinary of the Mass, esp. those parts sung by the choir.
Idioms:
in common, in joint possession or use; shared equally.
[1250–1300; Middle English comun < Anglo-French, Old French < Latin commūnis common <com- + mūnus task, duty, gift, c. mean2]
com′mon•ly, adv.
com′mon•ness, n.
syn: common, ordinary, vulgar refer, often with derogatory connotations, to what is usual or most often experienced. common applies to what is widespread or unexceptional; it often suggests inferiority or coarseness: common servants; common cloth. ordinary refers to what is to be expected in the usual order of things; it suggests being average or below average: a high price for something of such ordinary quality. vulgar means belonging to the people or characteristic of common people; it suggests low taste, coarseness, or ill breeding: vulgar manners; vulgar speech. See also general.

common

If something is common, it is found in large numbers or it happens often.

His name was Hansen, a common name in Norway.
These days, it is common to see adults returning to study.

The comparative and superlative forms of common are usually more common and most common. Commonest is sometimes used instead of more common in front of a noun.

Job sharing has become more common.
The disease is most common in adults over 40.
Stress is one of the commonest causes of insomnia.

Be Careful!
Don't use a that-clause after common. Don't say, for example, 'It is quite common that motorists fall asleep while driving'. You say 'It is quite common for motorists to fall asleep while driving'.

It is common for a child to become deaf after even a moderate ear infection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common - a piece of open land for recreational use in an urban area; "they went for a walk in the park"
amusement park, funfair, pleasure ground - a commercially operated park with stalls and shows for amusement
populated area, urban area - a geographical area constituting a city or town
village green - a village park consisting of a plot of grassy land
Adj.1.common - belonging to or participated in by a community as a whole; public; "for the common good"; "common lands are set aside for use by all members of a community"
joint - united or combined; "a joint session of Congress"; "joint owners"
individual, single - being or characteristic of a single thing or person; "individual drops of rain"; "please mark the individual pages"; "they went their individual ways"
2.common - having no special distinction or quality; widely known or commonly encountered; average or ordinary or usual; "the common man"; "a common sailor"; "the common cold"; "a common nuisance"; "followed common procedure"; "it is common knowledge that she lives alone"; "the common housefly"; "a common brand of soap"
usual - occurring or encountered or experienced or observed frequently or in accordance with regular practice or procedure; "grew the usual vegetables"; "the usual summer heat"; "came at the usual time"; "the child's usual bedtime"
ordinary - not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree; "ordinary everyday objects"; "ordinary decency"; "an ordinary day"; "an ordinary wine"
uncommon - not common or ordinarily encountered; unusually great in amount or remarkable in character or kind; "uncommon birds"; "frost and floods are uncommon during these months"; "doing an uncommon amount of business"; "an uncommon liking for money"; "he owed his greatest debt to his mother's uncommon character and ability"
3.common - common to or shared by two or more parties; "a common friend"; "the mutual interests of management and labor"
shared - have in common; held or experienced in common; "two shared valence electrons forming a bond between adjacent nuclei"; "a shared interest in philately"
4.common - commonly encountered; "a common (or familiar) complaint"; "the usual greeting"
familiar - within normal everyday experience; common and ordinary; not strange; "familiar ordinary objects found in every home"; "a familiar everyday scene"; "a familiar excuse"; "a day like any other filled with familiar duties and experiences"
5.common - being or characteristic of or appropriate to everyday language; "common parlance"; "a vernacular term"; "vernacular speakers"; "the vulgar tongue of the masses"; "the technical and vulgar names for an animal species"
informal - used of spoken and written language
6.common - of or associated with the great masses of peoplecommon - of or associated with the great masses of people; "the common people in those days suffered greatly"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "his square plebeian nose"; "a vulgar and objectionable person"; "the unwashed masses"
lowborn - of humble birth or origins; "a topsy-turvy society of lowborn rich and blue-blooded poor"
7.common - of low or inferior quality or value; "of what coarse metal ye are molded"- Shakespeare; "produced...the common cloths used by the poorer population"
inferior - of low or inferior quality
8.common - lacking refinement or cultivation or tastecommon - lacking refinement or cultivation or taste; "he had coarse manners but a first-rate mind"; "behavior that branded him as common"; "an untutored and uncouth human being"; "an uncouth soldier--a real tough guy"; "appealing to the vulgar taste for violence"; "the vulgar display of the newly rich"
unrefined - (used of persons and their behavior) not refined; uncouth; "how can a refined girl be drawn to such an unrefined man?"
9.common - to be expected; standard; "common decency"
ordinary - not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree; "ordinary everyday objects"; "ordinary decency"; "an ordinary day"; "an ordinary wine"

common

adjective
2. popular, general, accepted, standard, routine, widespread, universal, prevailing, prevalent It is common practice these days to administer vitamin K during childbirth.
3. shared, collective They share a common language.
4. ordinary, average, simple, typical, undistinguished, dinki-di (Austral. informal) He proclaims himself to be the voice of the common man.
ordinary important, famous, superior
5. vulgar, low, inferior, coarse, plebeian She might be a little common at times, but she was certainly not boring.
vulgar cultured, sensitive, distinguished, gentle, sophisticated, noble, refined
6. collective, public, community, social, communal social policies which promote the common good
collective private, personal

common

adjective
1. Belonging to, shared by, or applicable to all alike:
2. Belonging or relating to the whole:
3. Occurring quite often:
4. Commonly encountered:
5. Lacking high station or birth:
Archaic: base.
7. Of moderately good quality but less than excellent:
Informal: OK, tidy.
9. Known widely and unfavorably:
noun
1. The common people.Used in plural:
commonality, commonalty, commoner (used in plural), crowd, hoi polloi, mass (used in plural), mob, pleb (used in plural), plebeian (used in plural), populace, public, ruck, third estate.
2. A tract of cultivated land belonging to and used by a community:
Translations
أرْض عامَّه ، أرْض مَشاعإسْم عامخَشِن، فَظ، لِعامّة النّاسشَائِعشائِع
обикновенобщ
comúcomuna
běžnýspolečnýobyčejnýprostýsprostý
fællesfællesarealfælleskønfællesnavnjævn
yleinentavallinenyhteinen
čest
közlegelõköznévordenáré
algenguralmennings-almenninguróbreyttur; alòÿîanruddalegur, ókurteis
普通の
흔한
banalusbe¹drabendrasis kambarysbendrinisBendroji rinka
izplatītskopējskopīgslaukums sabiedriskiem pasākumiemparasts
obecný pozemok
običajenpogostprostaškiskupen
vanligallmängemensam
ที่เกิดขึ้นทุกวัน
yaygınadîbasitçayırlıkçimenlik
phổ biếnthông thườngthườngbình thườngchung

common

[ˈkɒmən]
A. ADJ
1. (= usual, ordinary) [event, experience, name, species] → común, corriente; [misconception, mistake] → común, frecuente
this butterfly is common in Spainesta mariposa es común or corriente en España
it is common for these animals to die younges corriente or frecuente que estos animales mueran jóvenes
it is a common belief thates una creencia extendida or generalizada que ...
common belief has it thatsegún la opinión generalizada ...
it's (just) common courtesyes una cortesía elemental
the common manel hombre de la calle, el hombre medio
it's a common occurrencees corriente que suceda
in common parlanceen lenguaje corriente
the common peoplela gente corriente
it is common practice in the USAes una práctica común en EE.UU.
pigeons are a common sight in Londones corriente or frecuente ver palomas en Londres
the common soldierel soldado raso
to have the common touchsaber tratar con la gente corriente
in common usede uso corriente
common or garden (esp Brit) → común y corriente, normal y corriente
2. (= shared) [cause, aim, language] → común
to work for a common aimcooperar para un mismo fin or para un objetivo común
by common agreement or consentde común acuerdo
for the common goodpara el bien común, para el bien de todos
common ground (fig) → puntos mpl en común, puntos mpl de confluencia or acuerdo
they discussed several issues of common interesthablaron de varios asuntos de interés común or de interés mutuo
it is common knowledge thates del dominio público que ...
the desire for freedom is common to all peopletodo el mundo comparte el deseo de la libertad
3. (pej) (= vulgar) [person, behaviour, speech] → ordinario, basto
as common as muckde lo más ordinario, más basto que la lija (del cuatro)
4. (Zool, Bot) → común
the common house flyla mosca común
B. N
1. (= land) → campo m comunal, ejido m
2. (Brit) (Pol) the Commons(la Cámera de) los Comunes
see also House A3
3. in common: we have a lot in common (with other people)tenemos mucho en común (con otra gente)
we have nothing in commonno tenemos nada en común
in common with many other companies, we advertise in the local pressal igual que otras muchas empresas, nos anunciamos en la prensa local
C. CPD the Common Agricultural Policy Nla Política Agrícola Común
common cold Nresfriado m común
common core N (Scol) (also common-core syllabus) → asignaturas fpl comunes
common currency N to become/be common currency [idea, belief] → convertirse en/ser moneda corriente
common denominator N (Math) → común denominador m
lowest common denominatormínimo común denominador m
Common Entrance N (Brit) (Scol) examen de acceso a un colegio de enseñanza privada
common factor N (Math) → factor m común
common land Npropiedad f comunal
common law N (Jur) (established by custom) → derecho m consuetudinario; (based on precedent) → jurisprudencia f
see also common-law the Common Market Nel Mercado Común
common noun Nnombre m común
common ownership N (= joint ownership) → copropiedad f (Pol) (= collective ownership) → propiedad f colectiva
the Book of Common Prayer Nla liturgia de la Iglesia Anglicana
common room N (esp Brit) (for students) → sala f de estudiantes; (for teachers) → sala f de profesores
common salt Nsal f común
common sense Nsentido m común
see also commonsense common stock N (US) (St Ex) → acciones fpl ordinarias
common time N (Mus) → cuatro m por cuatro
common wall Npared f medianera
COMMON LAW
Se llama common law o case law (derecho consuetudinario o jurisprudencia), al conjunto de leyes basadas en el fallo de los tribunales, a diferencia de las leyes establecidas por escrito en el Parlamento. El derecho consuetudinario inglés se desarrolló después de la conquista normanda, cuando los jueces basaban sus decisiones en la tradición o en el precedente judicial. La jurisprudencia sigue usándose como base del sistema legal anglosajón, aunque va perdiendo vigencia por el desarrollo del derecho escrito.

common

[ˈkɒmən]
adj
(= not rare) [plant, bird] → commun(e); [experience] → courant(e); [name] → courant(e)
"Smith" is a very common surname → "Smith" est un nom de famille très courant.
in common use → d'un usage courant
(= shared) → commun(e)
(in common) [cause] → commun(e)
(= vulgar) → vulgaire
it's common knowledge that ... → il est bien connu que ..., il est bien notoire que ...
for the common good → pour le bien de tous, dans l'intérêt général
n
(= public land) → terrain communal
We went for a walk on the common → Nous sommes allés nous promener sur le terrain communal.
in common → en commun
We've got a lot in common → Nous avons beaucoup de choses en commun.
to have sth in common with sb → avoir qch en commun avec qnCommon Agricultural Policy npolitique f agricole communecommon cold n
the common cold → le rhumecommon currency n
to become common currency [idea, story] → être connu(e) de touscommon denominator n (MATHEMATICS)dénominateur m communCommon Entrance n (British) examen d'entrée dans l'enseignement privé

common

adj (+er)
(= shared by many)gemeinsam; property alsoGemein-, gemeinschaftlich; common landAllmende f; common prostituteStraßendirne f; it is common knowledge that …es ist allgemein bekannt, dass …; it is to the common advantage that …es ist von allgemeinem Nutzen, dass …; very little/no common groundkaum eine/keine gemeinsame Basis; to find common ground (with somebody)eine gemeinsame Basis finden (mit jdm); something is common to everyone/somethingalle haben/etw hat etw gemein
(= frequently seen or heard etc)häufig; word alsoweitverbreitet, weit verbreitet, geläufig; experience alsoallgemein; animal, birdhäufig pred, → häufig anzutreffend attr; belief, custom, animal, bird(weit)verbreitet, weit verbreitet; (= customary, usual)normal; it’s quite a common sightdas sieht man ziemlich häufig; it’s common for visitors to feel ill hereBesucher fühlen sich hier häufig krank; nowadays it’s quite common for the man to do the houseworkes ist heutzutage ganz normal, dass der Mann die Hausarbeit macht
(= ordinary)gewöhnlich; the common mander Normalbürger; the common peopledie einfachen Leute; a common soldierein einfacher or gemeiner (dated)Soldat; the common run of mankinddie (breite) Masse; the common touchdas Volkstümliche; he has the common toucher kann gut mit Menschen umgehen; the Book of Common Prayer (Eccl) → die Agende; it’s only common decency to apologizees ist nur recht und billig, dass man sich entschuldigt
(= vulgar, low-class)gewöhnlich; to be as common as muck (Brit inf) → schrecklich gewöhnlich or ordinär sein
n
(= land)Anger m, → Gemeindewiese f
nothing out of the commonnichts Besonderes
to have something in common (with somebody/something)etw (mit jdm/etw) gemein haben; to have a lot/nothing in commonviel/nichts miteinander gemein haben, viele/keine Gemeinsamkeiten haben; we do at least have that in commonwenigstens das haben wir gemein; in common with many other people/towns/countries(ebenso or genauso) wie viele andere (Leute)/Städte/Länder …; I, in common with …ich, ebenso wie

common

:
common carrier
n (Comm: = transport company) → öffentliches Transportunternehmen; (Telec) → Telefongesellschaft f
common cold
nSchnupfen m
common core
n (Sch) → Pflichtfächer pl
common currency
n to be commonallgemein bekannt sein; (rumour)überall umgehen; to become commonallgemein bekannt werden
common denominator
n (Math, fig) → gemeinsamer Nenner; lowest common (Math, fig) → kleinster gemeinsamer Nenner
common divisor
Common Entrance (Examination)
nAufnahmeprüfung f (für eine britische Public School)

common

:
common factor
common fraction
common gender
n (Gram) → doppeltes Geschlecht
common law
common-law
adj she is his common wifesie lebt mit ihm in eheähnlicher Gemeinschaft; the law regarded her as his common wifevor dem Gesetz galt ihre Verbindung als eheähnliche Gemeinschaft

common

:
Common Market
Common Marketeer
nBefürworter(in) m(f)des Gemeinsamen Marktes
common multiple
ngemeinsame(s) Vielfache(s); the lowest or least commondas kleinste gemeinsame Vielfache

common

:
common noun
common-or-garden
adj (Brit) → Feld-, Wald- und Wiesen- (inf); topic, novel etcganz gewöhnlich
commonplace
adjalltäglich; (= banal) remarkbanal
nGemeinplatz m; a common (= frequent sight or event)etwas Alltägliches
common room
nAufenthalts- or Tagesraum m; (for teachers) → Lehrerzimmer nt; (Univ) → Dozentenzimmer nt

common

:
common sense
common-sense
adjvernünftig; attitude alsogesund; it’s the common thing to dodas ist das Vernünftigste
common stock
n (US St Ex) → Stammaktien pl
common time
commonweal
n (form)Gemeinwohl nt

common

[ˈkɒmən]
1. adj
a.comune; (usual) → normale
it's a common belief that ... → si tende a credere che...
it's a common occurrence → succede di frequente
it's common knowledge that ... → è risaputo or notorio che..., è di dominio pubblico che...
it's common courtesy → è una questione di semplice cortesia
in common use → di uso comune
common or garden → ordinario/a
the common man → l'uomo della strada
in common parlance → nel linguaggio corrente
the common people → il popolo
for the common good → nell'interesse generale, per il bene comune
b. (pej) (vulgar) → volgare, grossolano/a
2. n
a. (land) → parco comunale
b. we have a lot in commonabbiamo molto in comune

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.

common

شَائِع běžný fælles weitverbreitet συνήθης común yleinen commun čest comune 普通の 흔한 veelvoorkomend vanlig wspólny comum общий vanlig ที่เกิดขึ้นทุกวัน yaygın phổ biến 常见的

common

a. común, corriente;
___ namenombre ___;
___ placelugar ___;
___ sensesentido ___.

common

adj común; a common problem..un problema común; — sense sentido común
References in classic literature ?
I feel so rich and sort of elegant, with two new pairs, and the old ones cleaned up for common.
Concerning the old carpenter who fixed the bed for the writer, I only mentioned him because he, like many of what are called very common people, became the nearest thing to what is understandable and lovable of all the grotesques in the writer's book.
She was a battered woman now, not a lovely girl; but she still had that something which fires the imagination, could still stop one's breath for a moment by a look or gesture that somehow revealed the meaning in common things.
His cheerfulness was unbounded, and it was matched by his goodness of heart, his broad charity, and common sense.
They were of hostile tribes, brought together by the influence of the American government; and it is worthy of remark, that a common policy led them both to adopt the same subject.
The Indians plundered us of what we had, and kept us in confinement seven days, treating us with common savage usage.
There is one end of the room where it is almost intact, and there, when the crosslights fade and the low sun shines directly upon it, I can almost fancy radiation after all,--the interminable grotesques seem to form around a common centre and rush off in headlong plunges of equal distraction.
These young men are not common people, Christie; even if they have forgotten the restraints of speech and manners, they're gentlemen.
The street in which it upreared its venerable peaks has long ceased to be a fashionable quarter of the town; so that, though the old edifice was surrounded by habitations of modern date, they were mostly small, built entirely of wood, and typical of the most plodding uniformity of common life.
The line originally used in the fishery was of the best hemp, slightly vapored with tar, not impregnated with it, as in the case of ordinary ropes; for while tar, as ordinarily used, makes the hemp more pliable to the rope-maker, and also renders the rope itself more convenient to the sailor for common ship use; yet, not only would the ordinary quantity too much stiffen the whale-line for the close coiling to which it must be subjected; but as most seamen are beginning to learn, tar in general by no means adds to the rope's durability or strength, however much it may give it compactness and gloss.
Joe and Pumblechook who were so rude to me, and that there had been a beautiful young lady at Miss Havisham's who was dreadfully proud, and that she had said I was common, and that I knew I was common, and that I wished I was not common, and that the lies had come of it somehow, though I didn't know how.
While occupying myself with these no doubt wanton reflections on the unfair division of opportunities in human life, I was leisurely crossing the common, and presently I came up with a pedestrian who, though I had little suspected it as I caught sight of him ahead, was destined by a kind providence to make more entertaining talk for me in half an hour than most people provide in a lifetime.

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