common knowledge


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Related to common knowledge: general knowledge

common knowledge

n
something widely or generally known
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common knowledge - anything generally known to everyone
general knowledge, public knowledge - knowledge that is available to anyone
ancient history - knowledge of some recent fact or event that has become so commonly known that it has lost its original pertinence
Translations
أمْرٌ مَعْروف، مَفْهوم عام
věc všeobecně známá
köztudomású
almenn vitneskja, á allra vitorîi
všeobecne známa vec
bilinen gerçek

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.
References in classic literature ?
It is matter of common knowledge, my Barbara, that the poor man ranks lower than a rag, and will never earn the respect of any one.
Troubles enough lay ahead of her--the loss of friends and of social advantages, the agony, the supreme agony, of motherhood, which is even yet not a matter of common knowledge.
These things," Passmore continued, "are common knowledge.
We may be assured by past experience, that such a practice would be introduced by future contrivances; and both by that and a common knowledge of human affairs, that it would nourish unceasing animosities, and not improbably terminate in serious interruptions of the public tranquillity.
For it was common knowledge that Big Alec was as willing to bribe as to fight, and that of late years more than one patrolman had handled the fisherman's money.
For the moment, under the lamp-post, they seemed to be aware of some common knowledge which did away with the possibility of rivalry, and made them feel more sympathy for each other than for any one else in the world.
It is now common knowledge the promoters might have ventured upon the Albert Hall and still found their space too scanty.
Our goal is to bring the private and education sectors together to wage a war on bullying," states Daryl Hulce, administrator of the Common Knowledge Scholarship Foundation.
receipt of the consideration monies by the vendors of Common Knowledge, which
The scientists know what to avoid, and this should be common knowledge in the tattoo industries.
It has been common knowledge for several months that Villa manager David O'Leary has wanted to sign the 31year-old and now the move is close to reaching its conclusion.
It has been common knowledge in the church that a diocese might have a "particular theological bent," but that has never been enshrined in regulations, said Ms.