common law


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Related to common law: civil law, Common law marriage

common law

n.
1. Law established by court decisions rather than by statutes enacted by legislatures.
2. The law of England adopted by its territories and colonies, including the United States at the time of its formation.

common law

n
1. (Law) the body of law based on judicial decisions and custom, as distinct from statute law
2. (Law) the law of a state that is of general application, as distinct from regional customs
3. (Law) (modifier) : common-law denoting a marriage deemed to exist after a couple have cohabited for several years: common-law marriage; common-law wife.

com′mon law′


n.
the system of law originating in England, based on custom or court decisions rather than civil or ecclesiastical law.
[1300–50]

common law

The body of law based on court decisions, customs and practices rather than on statutes.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.common law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisionscommon law - (civil law) a law established by following earlier judicial decisions
service - (law) the acts performed by an English feudal tenant for the benefit of his lord which formed the consideration for the property granted to him
civil law - the body of laws established by a state or nation for its own regulation
2.common law - a system of jurisprudence based on judicial precedents rather than statutory laws; "common law originated in the unwritten laws of England and was later applied in the United States"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
Translations
القانون العام
zvykové právo
sædvaneret
szokásjog
zvykové právo
örf ve âdete dayanan hukuk

common law

ndiritto consuetudinario

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the first study to correlate the common law system and its historically weak property protections for married women to high HIV prevalence.
Anderson's paper proves that countries that use the common law system have significantly higher female HIV rates compared to countries that adopted the civil law traditions.
12) And the term lends no support for the government's position that military commissions can prosecute conspiracy as a violation of the common law of war.
The story begins, in Part I, with the government's invocation of the common law of war in the Al Bahlul habeas litigation, and then proceeds, in Part II, to examine the references to the common law of war in the Quirin German saboteurs case during World War II.
That relationship is of the first importance in those jurisdictions (like Australia, Canada, New Zealand, United Kingdom and the United States) where the tradition, framework and 'attitude of mind' of the common law is deeply rooted in a system where the predominant legal characteristic, overwhelmingly and increasingly so, is the ubiquity of statutes.
The article was an early, though certainly not the first, attempt to explain the relationship between common law and statute in an Australian context and how it might be deepened and better integrated.
From then on, common law lawyers have thought that the common law is reason accumulated since time immemorial.
It is easy to suppose that common law constitutionalism can only exist based on the long-established common law tradition in Anglo-American countries.
Each ALE member must file an information return with the IRS and furnish a statement to its full-time common law employees, using its own employer identification number (EIN).
Sobecki begins by tracing the history of the educational and collegiate elements of the common law Inns.
the movement viewed the core concepts of the common law as devoid of any
Indeed, Leoni uses the Roman law made by the jurisconsults and English common law essentially interchangeably as an analytical matter, so that the structure he uses in describing Roman law developed by the jurisconsult is essentially the same one that Hayek later identifies as distinctive in the common-law process under the English common law.