great northern diver

(redirected from common loons)
Related to common loons: Gavia immer

great northern diver

n
(Animals) a large northern bird, Gavia immer, with a black-and-white chequered back and a black head and neck in summer: family Gaviidae (divers)
Translations
Eistaucher

great northern diver

n (Zool) → tuffatore m dei ghiacci
References in periodicals archive ?
Wildlife biologists have determined that Quabbin Reservoir is home to half of the nesting population of common loons in the state.
Male Common Loons (Gavia immer) defend allpurpose territories on freshwater lakes by aggressive threat vocalizations called yodels (Sjolander and Argen 1972; Rummel and Goetzinger 1975, 1978).
The things people see are common loons, American black ducks, common mergansers, common golden eyes, and ring-necked ducks.
In 2002, beach transect surveys by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation yielded a count of 17,301 dead birds, mostly long tail ducks; in 2003, only 3,008 birds, mostly common loons, were found.
In their travels the Blues see snowy egrets, great blue herons, laughing gulls, roseate terns, Atlantic puffins, American oystercatchers, magnificent frigate birds, sandpipers, Brandt's cormorant, brown pelicans, winter wrens, thick-billed immures, and common loons.
Evers of the BioDiversity Research Institute in Gorham, Maine, and his colleagues analyzed mercury concentrations in yellow perch and common loons in the northern United States and southern Canada.
Wild common loons (Gavia immer) were captured across much of their southern North American range.
Bioaccumulation of mercury in yellow perch (Perca flavenscens) and common loons (Gavia immer) in relation to lake chemistry in Atlantic Canada.
The center has documented weight loss and death in common loons resulting from mercury poisoning, which comes from local sources and arrives via aerial transportation.
He has conducted evolutionary genetic research on common loons (Gavia immer), field studies of loon behavior in Wisconsin, Michigan, Alaska and Scotland, and has worked on the population genetics of the threatened harpy eagle (Harpia harpyja).
Such injured biological resources included bald eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), black oystercatchers (Haematopus bachmani), common loons (Gavia immer), clams, common murres (Uria aalge), cormorants (Phalacrocorax, three species), cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii), Dolly Varden trout (Salvelinus malma), harlequin ducks (Histrionicus histrionicus), harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), Kittlitz's murrelets (Brachyramphus brevirostris), marbled murrelets (Brachyramphus marmoratus marmoratus), killer whales (Orcinus orca), mussels (Mytilus edulis), Pacific herring (Clupea harengus), river otters (Lutra canadensis), pigeon guillemots (Cepphus columba), pink salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha), rockfish (Sebastes sp.
In spring, look for sea otters and birds such as pelagic cormorants, surf scoters, and Pacific and common loons in breeding plumage.