common prayer

Related to common prayer: prayer book

common prayer

n
(Anglicanism) the liturgy of public services of the Church of England, esp Morning and Evening Prayer
References in classic literature ?
The book of Common Prayer is the composition of men like ourselves.
He had no fixed belief, but he went to the service of his church whenever it was held among us, and he revered the Book of Common Prayer while he disputed the authority of the Bible with all comers.
The Book of Common Prayer, now used in the English Church coordinately with Bible and Psalter, took shape out of previous primers of private devotion, litanies, and hymns, mainly as the work of Archbishop Cranmer during the reign of Edward VI.
Vandenhuten received her, and seated her beside himself; we drove all together to the Protestant chapel, went through a certain service in the Common Prayer Book, and she and I came out married.
Shah contended that the common prayer is a"religious instruction"within the meaning of Article 28 of the Constitution and should be prohibited.
Another resolution to remove a prayer for the conversion of the Jews from the Book of Common Prayer is likely to come before General Synod in 2019, after a decision made by Council of General Synod (CoGS) November 11.
Professor Elmore offers chapter and verse evidence from the Bible as well as specific examples from the Episcopal Book of Common Prayer to illustrate how Lincoln borrowed from these sources to imbue his speech with meanings that would resonate with his listeners.
In the nearly 40 years since the advent of the 1979 Book of Common Prayer, the re-translation of the Psalter created for that book has become a standard, used not only by Episcopalians, but adopted by others into their own worship service books and liturgies.
A BOOK of Common Prayer from 1666 has been returned to a library after being stolen in the 1800s.
1549: The Church of England adopted The Book of Common Prayer compiled by Thomas Cranmer.
While the early works issued by the Merrymount Press each attest to Updike's meticulousness in finding the right type for the job, the monumental 1928 publication of The Book of Common Prayer using Janson type is the culmination of Updike's adventures in working with original type.
The notes explain words and phrases that are no longer common speech, identify references to such works as the Book of Common Prayer and to contemporary social and political events and people, and insert passages from other works of fiction or nonfiction that may have inspired Dickens' passage.