commonly


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com·mon

 (kŏm′ən)
adj. com·mon·er, com·mon·est
1.
a. Belonging equally to or shared equally by two or more; joint: common interests.
b. Of or relating to the community as a whole; public: for the common good.
2. Widespread; prevalent: Gas stations became common as the use of cars grew.
3.
a. Occurring frequently or habitually; usual: It is common for movies to last 90 minutes or more.
b. Most widely known; ordinary: the common housefly.
4. Having no special designation, status, or rank: a common sailor.
5.
a. Not distinguished by superior or noteworthy characteristics; average: the common spectator.
b. Of no special quality; standard: common procedure.
c. Of mediocre or inferior quality; second-rate: common cloth.
6. Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar: behavior that branded him as common.
7. Grammar
a. Either masculine or feminine in gender.
b. Representing one or all of the members of a class; not designating a unique entity.
n.
1. commons The common people; commonalty.
2. commons (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. The social class composed of commoners.
b. The parliamentary representatives of this class.
3. Commons The House of Commons.
4. A tract of land, usually in a centrally located spot, belonging to or used by a community as a whole: a band concert on the village common.
5. The legal right of a person to use the lands or waters of another, as for fishing.
6. commons (used with a sing. verb) A building or hall for dining, typically at a university or college.
7. Common stock.
8. Ecclesiastical A service used for a particular class of festivals.
Idiom:
in common
Equally with or by all.

[Middle English commune, from Old French commun, from Latin commūnis; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

com′mon·ly adv.
com′mon·ness n.
Synonyms: common, ordinary, familiar
These adjectives describe what is generally known or frequently encountered. Common applies to what takes place often, is widely used, or is well known: The botanist studied the common dandelion. The term also implies coarseness or a lack of distinction: My wallet was stolen by a common thief. Ordinary describes something usual that is indistinguishable from others, sometimes derogatorily: A ballpoint pen is adequate for ordinary purposes. The critic gave the ordinary performance a mediocre review. Familiar applies to what is well known or quickly recognized: Most children can recite familiar nursery rhymes. See Also Synonyms at general.

commonly

(ˈkɒmənlɪ)
adv
1. usually; ordinarily: he was commonly known as Joe.
2. derogatory in a coarse or vulgar way: she dresses commonly.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.commonly - under normal conditions; "usually she was late"

commonly

adverb
In an expected or customary manner; for the most part:
Idioms: as usual, per usual.
Translations

commonly

[ˈkɒmənlɪ] ADV
1. (= usually, frequently) [called] → comúnmente; [prescribed] → frecuentemente
more commonly known asmás comúnmente conocido como ...
anorexia is more commonly found among womenla anorexia es más común or corriente entre las mujeres
an orchid which is not commonly found in this countryuna orquídea que no es corriente encontrar or que no se encuentra frecuentemente en este país
it is commonly the case thates corriente que ..., frecuentemente se da el caso de que ...
acupuncture is commonly used in Chinala acupuntura es una práctica muy común en China
2. (= generally) the commonly held viewla opinión extendida or generalizada
it is commonly accepted as the best in the worldes aceptado por todos como el mejor del mundo
it is commonly believed thates una creencia extendida or generalizada que ...
the disease is commonly thought to be caused by a viruses una creencia extendida or generalizada que esta enfermedad está causada por un virus
3. (= vulgarly) [behave, speak, dress] → ordinariamente, vulgarmente

commonly

[ˈkɒmənli] adv
(= often) [used] → communément, généralement; [found] → fréquemment
to be commonly associated with sth → être fréquemment associé(e) à qch
(in layman's terms) [called] → couramment; [known as] → généralementCommon Market n (formerly, in Europe) the Common Market → le Marché communcommon market n (= trade organization) → marché m communcommon-or-garden common or garden [ˌkɒmənərˈgɑːrdən] adj (mainly British)ordinaire

commonly

adv
(= often)häufig; (= widely)gemeinhin, weithin; a commonly held beliefeine weitverbreitete or weit verbreitete Ansicht; it is commonly believed that …es wird allgemein angenommen, dass …; (more) commonly known as …besser bekannt als …
(= vulgarly)gewöhnlich, ordinär

commonly

[ˈkɒmənlɪ] adv (see adj) → comunemente, usualmente, in modo volgare
References in classic literature ?
In war, he is daring, boastful, cunning, ruthless, self-denying, and self-devoted; in peace, just, generous, hospitable, revengeful, superstitious, modest, and commonly chaste.
In his younger days--for, after all, there was a dim tradition that he had been, not young, but younger--Uncle Venner was commonly regarded as rather deficient, than otherwise, in his wits.
Unless people are more than commonly disagreeable, it is my foolish habit to contract a kindness for them.
Thus, by divers little makeshifts, in that ingenious way which is commonly denominated "by hook and by crook," the worthy pedagogue got on tolerably enough, and was thought, by all who understood nothing of the labor of headwork, to have a wonderfully easy life of it.
It yields the article commonly known as whalebone or baleen; and the oil specially known as whale oil, an inferior article in commerce.
And though all hands commonly disdained the capture of those inferior creatures; and though the Pequod was not commissioned to cruise for them at all, and though she had passed numbers of them near the Crozetts without lowering a boat; yet now that a Sperm Whale had been brought alongside and beheaded, to the surprise of all, the announcement was made that a Right Whale should be captured that day, if opportunity offered.
The roadway was commonly several feet lower than the level of the houses, which were sometimes joined by high board walks; there were no pavements--there were mountains and valleys and rivers, gullies and ditches, and great hollows full of stinking green water.
Black Sam, as he was commonly called, from his being about three shades blacker than any other son of ebony on the place, was revolving the matter profoundly in all its phases and bearings, with a comprehensiveness of vision and a strict lookout to his own personal well-being, that would have done credit to any white patriot in Washington.
Yet such as these even are commonly esteemed good citizens.
I think that I cannot preserve my health and spirits, unless I spend four hours a day at least--and it is commonly more than that--sauntering through the woods and over the hills and fields, absolutely free from all worldly engagements.
Rebecca's own black locks were commonly pushed smoothly off her forehead, but on this occasion she formed what I must perforce call by its only name, a spit-curl, directly in the centre of her brow, an ornament which she was allowed to wear a very short time, only in fact till Hannah was able to call her mother's attention to it, when she was sent into the next room to remove it and to come back looking like a Christian.
There is a vestige of decency, a sense of shame, that does much to curb and check those outbreaks of atrocious cruelty so commonly enacted upon the plantation.