commonness


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

com·mon

 (kŏm′ən)
adj. com·mon·er, com·mon·est
1.
a. Belonging equally to or shared equally by two or more; joint: common interests.
b. Of or relating to the community as a whole; public: for the common good.
2. Widespread; prevalent: Gas stations became common as the use of cars grew.
3.
a. Occurring frequently or habitually; usual: It is common for movies to last 90 minutes or more.
b. Most widely known; ordinary: the common housefly.
4. Having no special designation, status, or rank: a common sailor.
5.
a. Not distinguished by superior or noteworthy characteristics; average: the common spectator.
b. Of no special quality; standard: common procedure.
c. Of mediocre or inferior quality; second-rate: common cloth.
6. Unrefined or coarse in manner; vulgar: behavior that branded him as common.
7. Grammar
a. Either masculine or feminine in gender.
b. Representing one or all of the members of a class; not designating a unique entity.
n.
1. commons The common people; commonalty.
2. commons(used with a sing. or pl. verb)
a. The social class composed of commoners.
b. The parliamentary representatives of this class.
3. Commons The House of Commons.
4. A tract of land, usually in a centrally located spot, belonging to or used by a community as a whole: a band concert on the village common.
5. The legal right of a person to use the lands or waters of another, as for fishing.
6. commons(used with a sing. verb) A building or hall for dining, typically at a university or college.
7. Common stock.
8. Ecclesiastical A service used for a particular class of festivals.
Idiom:
in common
Equally with or by all.

[Middle English commune, from Old French commun, from Latin commūnis; see mei- in Indo-European roots.]

com′mon·ly adv.
com′mon·ness n.
Synonyms: common, ordinary, familiar
These adjectives describe what is generally known or frequently encountered. Common applies to what takes place often, is widely used, or is well known: The botanist studied the common dandelion. The term also implies coarseness or a lack of distinction: My wallet was stolen by a common thief. Ordinary describes something usual that is indistinguishable from others, sometimes derogatorily: "His neighbors were all climbing into their cars and trucks and heading off to work as if nothing miraculous had happened and this were just another ordinary day" (Steve Yarbrough).
Familiar applies to what is well known or quickly recognized: Most children can recite familiar nursery rhymes. See Also Synonyms at general.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commonness - the state of being that is commonly observed
normalcy, normality - being within certain limits that define the range of normal functioning
2.commonness - the quality of lacking taste and refinementcommonness - the quality of lacking taste and refinement
inelegance - the quality of lacking refinement and good taste
3.commonness - ordinariness as a consequence of being frequent and commonplace
ordinariness, mundaneness, mundanity - the quality of being commonplace and ordinary
prosaicness, prosiness - commonplaceness as a consequence of being humdrum and not exciting
usualness - commonness by virtue of not being unusual
uncommonness - extraordinariness as a consequence of being rare and seldom encountered
4.commonness - sharing of common attributes
generality - the quality of being general or widespread or having general applicability
solidarity - a union of interests or purposes or sympathies among members of a group
Translations

commonness

[ˈkɒmənnɪs] N
1. (= frequency) → frecuencia f
2. (= vulgarity) → ordinariez f

commonness

n
(= frequency)Häufigkeit f; (of word also)weite Verbreitung, Geläufigkeit f; (of experience also)Allgemeinheit f
(= vulgarity)Gewöhnlichkeit f; (of person also)ordinäre Art

commonness

[ˈkɒmənnɪs] n (of method, belief) → diffusione f; (of occurrence) → frequenza; (of person, accent) → grossolanità, volgarità
References in classic literature ?
Suzanne was one of his favorites, a clever, ambitious girl, made of the stuff of a Sophie Arnold, and handsome withal, as the handsomest courtesan invited by Titian to pose on black velvet for a model of Venus; although her face, fine about the eyes and forehead, degenerated, lower down, into commonness of outline.
She let him do as he liked, although in the street she was offish enough to other men, refusing their familiarities partly from decorum and partly for contempt for their commonness.
But nothing contributes more to produce a clearness of diction that is remote from commonness than the lengthening, contraction, and alteration of words.
Costello had pronounced her; yet it was a wonder to Winterbourne that, with her commonness, she had a singularly delicate grace.
Her cheeks were red with anger, and when she answered her voice had the hard commonness which she concealed generally by a genteel enunciation.
How could there be any commonness in a man so well-bred, so ambitious of social distinction, so generous and unusual in his views of social duty?
Before the eyes of his chief priest he disdained to lower himself to such commonness of humanity.
The different elements contributed to the modern English character by the latest stocks which have been united in it have been indicated by Matthew Arnold in a famous passage ('On the Study of Celtic Literature'): 'The Germanic [Anglo-Saxon and 'Danish'] genius has steadiness as its main basis, with commonness and humdrum for its defect, fidelity to nature for its excellence.
Since the wood-cutters, and the railroad, and I myself have profaned Walden, perhaps the most attractive, if not the most beautiful, of all our lakes, the gem of the woods, is White Pond; -- a poor name from its commonness, whether derived from the remarkable purity of its waters or the color of its sands.
Directors, ventilating the commonness of post-communist China, tend to adjourn the action to Shanghai which is still depicted as the city of contrasts.
As a result, the category of amino acids by the precursors of gluconeogenesis/ketogenesis pathways (Scheme) led to the common phenomenon of the effect of taurine supplementation on the amino acid alteration in the GC muscle, while there was no commonness in other categories.
The standardization of these measu-rements and their commonness, both in Europe (EN 480-11) and in the USA (ASTM C 457-98), provide evidence for high reliability of examination results.