commonplace


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com·mon·place

 (kŏm′ən-plās′)
adj.
1. Ordinary; common: a period when labor strikes were commonplace.
2. Uninteresting; unremarkable: "his disappointment at finding his child so commonplace" (Jane Stevenson).
n.
1.
a. A trite or obvious saying; a platitude: "the solidified commonplaces of established wisdom" (John Simon).
b. Something, especially an occurrence, that is ordinary or common: "These stories dealt only with the commonplaces of life" (Jack London).
2. Archaic A passage marked for reference or entered in a commonplace book.

[Translation of Latin locus commūnis, generally applicable literary passage, translation of Greek koinos topos.]

commonplace

(ˈkɒmənˌpleɪs)
adj
1. ordinary; everyday: commonplace duties.
2. dull and obvious; trite: commonplace prose.
n
3. something dull and trite, esp a remark; platitude; truism
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a passage in a book marked for inclusion in a commonplace book, etc
5. an ordinary or common thing
[C16: translation of Latin locus commūnis argument of wide application, translation of Greek koinos topos]
ˈcommonˌplaceness n

com•mon•place

(ˈkɒm ənˌpleɪs)

adj.
1. ordinary; undistinguished or uninteresting.
2. dull or platitudinous: a commonplace remark.
n.
3. a well-known, customary, or obvious remark; a trite or uninteresting saying; platitude.
4. anything common, ordinary, or uninteresting.
5. Archaic. a place or passage in a book or writing noted as important for reference or quotation.
[1525–35; translation of Latin locus commūnis, itself translation of Greek koinòs tópos]
com′mon•place`ness, n.
syn: commonplace, banal, trite, hackneyed describe words, remarks, and styles of expression that are lifeless and uninteresting. commonplace characterizes expression that is so ordinary, self-evident, or generally accepted as to be boring or pointless: a commonplace affirmation of the obvious. banal often suggests an inane or insipid quality: banal conversation. trite suggests that an expression has lost its force because of excessive repetition: trite poetic imagery. hackneyed is a stronger word implying that the expression has become meaningless from overuse: hackneyed metaphors.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.commonplace - a trite or obvious remark
comment, remark, input - a statement that expresses a personal opinion or belief or adds information; "from time to time she contributed a personal comment on his account"
truism - an obvious truth
Adj.1.commonplace - completely ordinary and unremarkable; "air travel has now become commonplace"; "commonplace everyday activities"
ordinary - not exceptional in any way especially in quality or ability or size or degree; "ordinary everyday objects"; "ordinary decency"; "an ordinary day"; "an ordinary wine"
2.commonplace - not challengingcommonplace - not challenging; dull and lacking excitement; "an unglamorous job greasing engines"
unexciting - not exciting; "an unexciting novel"; "lived an unexciting life"
3.commonplace - repeated too often; overfamiliar through overuse; "bromidic sermons"; "his remarks were trite and commonplace"; "hackneyed phrases"; "a stock answer"; "repeating threadbare jokes"; "parroting some timeworn axiom"; "the trite metaphor `hard as nails'"
unoriginal - not original; not being or productive of something fresh and unusual; "the manuscript contained unoriginal emendations"; "his life had been unoriginal, conforming completely to the given pattern"- Gwethalyn Graham

commonplace

adjective
1. everyday, common, ordinary, widespread, pedestrian, customary, mundane, vanilla (slang), banal, run-of-the-mill, humdrum, dime-a-dozen (informal) Foreign vacations have become commonplace nowadays.
everyday new, interesting, original, novel, strange, exciting, rare, unique, unusual, extraordinary, unfamiliar, uncommon, ground-breaking, infrequent, left-field (informal)
noun
1. cliché, platitude, banality, truism It is a commonplace to say that the poetry of the first world war was greater than that of the second.

commonplace

adjectivenoun
1. A trite expression or idea:
2. A regular or customary matter, condition, or course of events:
Translations
عادي، تافِه، مُبْتَذَل
všední
almindelighverdagsagtigordinær
hversdagslegur

commonplace

[ˈkɒmənpleɪs]
A. ADJ (= normal) → común, normal, corriente (pej) → vulgar, ordinario
it is commonplace to see this sort of thinges frecuente or corriente ver este tipo de cosas
B. N (= event) → cosa f común y corriente; (= statement) → tópico m, lugar m común

commonplace

[ˈkɒmənpleɪs] adjbanal(e), ordinairecommon room n (British) (for students)salle f commune

commonplace

[ˈkɒmənˌpleɪs]
1. adjcomune (pej) → banale, ordinario/a
2. n (statement) → luogo comune

common

(ˈkomən) adjective
1. seen or happening often; quite normal or usual. a common occurrence; These birds are not so common nowadays.
2. belonging equally to, or shared by, more than one. This knowledge is common to all of us; We share a common language.
3. publicly owned. common property.
4. coarse or impolite. She uses some very common expressions.
5. of ordinary, not high, social rank. the common people.
6. of a noun, not beginning with a capital letter (except at the beginning of a sentence). The house is empty.
noun
(a piece of) public land for everyone to use, with few or no buildings. the village common.
ˈcommoner noun
a person who is not of high rank. The royal princess married a commoner.
common knowledge
something known to everyone or to most people. Surely you know that already – it's common knowledge.
common ˈlaw noun
a system of unwritten laws based on old customs and on judges' earlier decisions.
ˈcommon-law adjective
referring to a relationship between two people who are not officially married, but have the same rights as husband and wife. a common-law marriage; a common-law wife/husband.
ˈcommonplace adjective
very ordinary and uninteresting. commonplace remarks.
ˈcommon-room noun
in a college, school etc a sitting-room for the use of a group.
common sense
practical good sense. If he has any common sense he'll change jobs.
the Common Market
(formerly) an association of certain European countries to establish free trade (without duty, tariffs etc) among them, now replaced by the European Union.
the (House of) Commons
the lower house of the British parliament.
in common
(of interests, attitudes, characteristics etc) shared or alike. They have nothing in common – I don't know why they're getting married.
References in classic literature ?
When his way homeward led him again into the street of frame houses he could not bear the sight and began to run, wanting to get quickly out of the neighborhood that now seemed to him utterly squalid and commonplace.
He's thinking of so many things, perhaps, that he can't get his mind down to the commonplace.
He made some commonplace observation upon the baneful effect of the night air at the season.
While writing this book, fully a quarter of a century since, it occurred to us that the French name of this lake was too complicated, the American too commonplace, and the Indian too unpronounceable, for either to be used familiarly in a work of fiction.
There was likewise, at times, a vein of something like poetry in him; it was the moss or wall-flower of his mind in its small dilapidation, and gave a charm to what might have been vulgar and commonplace in his earlier and middle life.
He possessed no power of thought no depth of feeling, no troublesome sensibilities: nothing, in short, but a few commonplace instincts, which, aided by the cheerful temper which grew inevitably out of his physical well-being, did duty very respectably, and to general acceptance, in lieu of a heart.
His outward life was commonplace and uninteresting; he was just a hotel-porter, and expected to remain one while he lived; but meantime, in the realm of thought, his life was a perpetual adventure.
He was a short, thick-set man, with coarse, commonplace features, and that swaggering air of pretension which marks a low man who is trying to elbow his way upward in the world.
But it never occurred to one of them to reflect that if I was such a wonderful necro- mancer as I was pretending to be, I ought not to need salves or instructions, or charms against enchantments, and, least of all, arms and armor, on a foray of any kind -- even against fire-spouting dragons, and devils hot from perdition, let alone such poor adversaries as these I was after, these commonplace ogres of the back settlements.
And no mere commonplace language, either, but rattling, out-and-out book-talk--and bristling with metaphor, too--just bristling
The women were good and commonplace people, and did their duty, and had their reward in clear consciences and the community's approbation.
The boys were not able to remem- ber that their remarks had possessed weight before; but now their sayings were treasured and repeated; everything they did seemed somehow to be regarded as remarkable; they had evidently lost the power of doing and saying commonplace things; moreover, their past history was raked up and discovered to bear marks of conspicuous originality.